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Batman: Year One Paperback – Deluxe Edition


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 136 pages
  • Publisher: DC Comics; De Luxe edition edition (January 10, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401207529
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401207526
  • Product Dimensions: 2.6 x 4 x 0.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (411 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,108 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Whether you grew up reading Batman comics, watched the campy television show, or eagerly await each new movie, this is the book for you. A retelling of the events that led to Bruce Wayne's becoming Batman, this book combines Frank Miller's tight film-noir writing with David Mazucchelli's solid artwork. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

Grade 4 Up–In the late 1980s, DC Comics revamped many superheroes but realized that Batman should remain true to his 1939 history. According to the introduction, the editors also decided that the public needed to know more about Batman's early life as a vigilante, and Miller and Mazzucchelli came together to produce Batman: Year One. Originally released in 1988 in four parts, the stories have been combined into one book. Opening with the arrival of Lieutenant James Gordon in Gotham's police force, the story goes on to inform readers about the level of corruption permeating the force. They also witness Bruce Wayne's first encounter with the prostitute named Selina, who will become Catwoman. Wayne speaks to his dead father, asking for guidance, and is answered with a bat on the windowsill, and Batman is born. The remaining chapters highlight Gordon's continuing difficulties with the corrupt police force, Batman's early difficulties in protecting and using his arsenal of weapons, and the first villains he chooses to pursue. At the end of the book, readers are treated to some background on Mazzucchelli's art, the production of Year One, and details on Richmond Lewis's coloring techniques. Both beginning and devoted Batman fans will enjoy this edition.–Sarah Krygier, Solano County Library, Fairfield, CA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Customer Reviews

The artwork in the story is very good.
Darth Nat
Meaning, the things that happen in this book are great for people who've been Batman fans for a longer period of time (and I mean really good.
Ron Tothleben (tothleben@hotmail.com)
Frank Miller's Batman: Year One is without a doubt one of Miller's best stories and arguably the greatest Batman tale ever told.
Greg Rice

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

114 of 118 people found the following review helpful By Darth Nat on May 11, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Batman is a character I've always enjoyed, but I've only recently started getting into the Batman comics. After reading Frank Miller's exceptional "Batman: The Dark Knight Returns" graphic novel, I really wanted to acquire more Batman comics that depicted the characters in a similar manner: as deep, well-thought-out characters that you really feel emotionally attached to by the end of the story. The problem was that, being new to comics, I was tossed into a sea of nearly endless Batman comics, and I didn't really know where to begin.

Well, where better to start than at the very beginning?

Batman: Year One is the story of Batman's first year in Gotham City after returning from training abroad, making it the perfect book for someone unfamiliar with Batman's origins, or just looking for a fresh take on the classic story. But the book is as much about the origins of Jim Gordon, who will later become the famed police commissioner of Gotham City, as it is about Batman's beginning. The story hinges on Gordon's attempts to clean up a police force that is corrupt to its very core, and his encounters with the Batman that finally lead up to a climactic confrontation that brings both men together in their fight against crime.

Firse of all, the packaging and presentation of the story is top-notch. The book is hard bound and comes with a very nice partial sleeve that makes it look very classy. The cover itself depicts a simple black and white drawing of Batman that is quite effective for portraying what the book is about. Each chapter of the story opens with the origin comic book cover from each issue, and they are very vivid and clean.
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93 of 105 people found the following review helpful By Ramon Varela on January 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
It is a shame that, Tim Burton's excellent two outings notwithstanding, the Batman of film and television is the one that is most solidly rooted in the collective psyche of the public. What many current readers may not remember, however, is that the campiness of the 1966-68 TV show was reflected in, and fed off the Batman titles at the time.
All of that changed when Dennis O'Neil took over the writing chores and returned the character to the dark roots laid out by the late, great, Bob Kane and Bill Finger. Dennis O'Neil brought Batman comics into and through puberty. Frank Miller brought them into adulthood.
Along with the brilliant "Dark Knight Returns," "Year One" bookends the saga of Bruce Wayne by re-interpreting and sometimes redefining the character's roots. In so doing, Frank Miller laid the foundation for the character that today populates the monthly titles. Although not as grim as "Dark Knight," "Year One" nonetheless hits closer to home and is, in my opinion, the best introduction to the character for anyone unfamiliar with it outside of film and TV.
The parallel struggles of Bruce Wayne and Jim Gordon to "clean up a city that likes being dirty" are brilliantly rendered by Miller, possibly the finest comics writer EVER. Miller's Jim Gordon is a far cry from the incompetent beat cop shown in movies and TV. He is a passionate, crusading man, the sort of cop Bruce Wayne might have been in another reality.
Opinions have always been strong one way or the other about the art in "Year One." For my money, you couldn't ask for more. Mazzucchelli's pencils work wonders even beyond what he did in "Daredevil: Born Again," and the coloring is particularly striking in its subtlety, even more so when you consider the "beat you over the head" standards of late-'80s comics.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Andre 2015 on May 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
When this miniseries first came out back in the eighties it left everyone breathless. David Mazzucchelli's art is some of the finest I've ever seen. It moves like a motion picture yet every still is ready to be framed (nice homage to the famous Hopper painting on the side: Gorden and Sgt. Essen having a late night coffee in a cafe called ... Hopper)

Frank Miller tells a story right from the beginning of the Batman saga. Bruce Wayne and Lieutenant Gordon discover they are both fighting on the same side to clean Gotham from the human filth. The only way to survive in the mess is as a team. They become friends.

On top of the fantastic graphic novel this book includes over 40 pages of sketches, layouts and script pages. Every Batman fan should have it, what do I say, this is one for you. Buy it. You won't be disappointed, I swear.
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43 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Jeffrey A. Veyera VINE VOICE on July 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
Following up on his 1986 renovation of the Batman myth with "The Dark Knight Returns", Frank Miller teamed with David Mazzucchelli to produce "Batman: Year One", a novel retelling of how Bruce Wayne came to don tights to fight crime.
Miller's Gotham City is a corrupt and festering cesspool, much as he would later depict in his Sin City series. Two good men come to town to clean things up: Bruce Wayne and Jim Gordon, a new detective on the Gotham police force fresh from his role in cleaning up another police department.
Wayne himself has returned to his hometown after a long absence, during which he trained himself to become a vigilante. Wayne's first foray into crimefighting nearly ends in disaster, but leads him ultimately to adopt the Batman motif to frighten criminals. Gordon becomes his unlikely ally as he strives to clean up Gotham's police department.
The writing remains more mature and gritty than the typical comic book fare of the time. Batman is not the invincible denizen of the dark we've come to know and love, but an awkward guy in a goofy costume who seems always to be within an inch of death. Gordon is no paragon of virtue either; the main subplot deals with his affair with another cop while his wife waits to give birth to his son.
The result is a gripping, gritty, and ultimately redeeming tale which once again reinvents the familiar figure of the Batman.
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