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Bats Mass Market Paperback – April 1, 1987


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Bantam (April 1, 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553264605
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553264609
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,003,672 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Even to ardent Met fans, a book about the team's second-place finish in 1985 might seem not worth bothering with, but that would be making a mistake. Probaby no better volume has ever been written about a baseball team's season from the viewpoint of an intelligent and sensitive manager. Wherever he has been the skipper, Johnson's teams have finished better than predicted, and that was the case in 1985 as well. Here, aided by Golenbock (The Bronx Zoo, Balls, Johnson tells what it was like to run a team plagued by injuries, a team made up largely of young players who needed to be encouraged, a team that had almostbut not quiteenough talent to be the best. He writes of his enthusiasm for his players, especially Gooden, Carter and Hernandez; his travails with the media; and, above all, his cornering the market on Rolaids. A grand baseball book.
Copyright 1986 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Green on October 16, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The 1986 New York Mets were the World Series Champions led by one of the greatest managers in franchise history, Davey Johnson. But this book, Bats, is about the 1985 Mets, a second place finishing, good team.

They say that no one remembers who finishes second. I would like to change that and say we should remember who comes in second if they should come in first the following year. Which is what the Mets did. With this viewpoint in mind, one would and should take a look at Davey Johnson's season long account of the year before the year of the legendary 86 team.

Within Bats is a look at what Johnson saw, felt, and thought while he maintains a rocky relationship with Frank Cashen, the general manager, develops a heavy dependence on Rolaids, and issues one hundred and two hundred dollar fines to players for base running mistakes and showing up late to the ballpark. He talks about what he did to get the job and how he handled his players; Keith Hernandez talking in the third person and like a kid when he points out a good accomplishment to Johnson "did you in see Mex hit that home run?", Doug Sisk, with his inconsistent pitching performances, gets the most mentions in the book, , and his prediction about Dwight Gooden pitching a perfect game in the future (he does, but for the Yankees in 1996).

Probably taken from a daily journal, the book is very autobiographical and provides a pretty well rounded look at Johnson, the man and manager. Being only in my early twenties, I was only four and five and too young to understand the Mets of the Eighties in the same way I came to understand and love the Mets of the Nineties (the hard decade that it was) and, of course, the 2000's.
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By Scott on February 18, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I didnt even know this book existed until it was mentioned in "The Bad Guys Won", about the 1986 Mets. What a great inside look into the strategy of managing an MLB club and the stress that goes along with it. Can see why Davey Johnson was a great manager. Being a coach myself, I enjoyed it. I was worried that it might be outdated, but I was pleasantly surprised. A very underrated book. Davey's statement in the last paragraph comparing the '85 Mets with his 1969 Orioles was eerily profound, and gave me goose bumps.
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By Jerry Weaver on October 18, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the day-by-day diary of Mets manager Davey Johnson of the 1985 New York Mets season. It was a year in which the Mets were expected to win their division, but in the end fell a couple of games short to the Cardinals.

Because of its limited focus, this book is likely to appeal only to rabid Mets fans, and to those interested in learning what goes in a manager's head as he makes all the day-to-day decisions required of him. One aspect of this that Johnson dwells on is how you as a manager nurse along a young ballplayer. Davey's special project in this regard was his young third-baseman Howard Johnson. Davey writes a lot about the importance of putting a young player in situations in which he can succeed, and keeping him out of situations with the potential for failure. You show confidence in a player as much as you can, because that is what allows the player to build up confidence in himself.

The descriptions Davey presents give us a good feel for the different ballplayers he managed; you sense Gary Carter's boyish enthusiasm, the intensity of Keith Hernandez, Lenny Dykstra's scrappiness, and so on. Each player needs to be treated differently based on the needs of that player, and a good manager learns that art. Several principles, however, are universal, like the need to be straight with each player by telling him what his role is, the need to treat everybody as men instead of boys, and the need to not burden the team with a bunch of rules.

One theme which runs throughout the book is the prevalence of injuries. We fans know about injuries which cause a player to be placed on the disabled list; however, that is just the tip of the iceberg.
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By bigdcowgal on July 11, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The quality was listed as "very good", but it was worn and yellowed. I was embarrassed to give it as a gift.
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