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The Battle of Crécy, 1346 (Warfare in History) Paperback


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The Battle of Crécy, 1346 (Warfare in History) + The Flower of Chivalry: Bertrand du Guesclin and the Hundred Years War + Edward the Black Prince: Power in Medieval Europe
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Product Details

  • Series: Warfare in History
  • Paperback: 404 pages
  • Publisher: Boydell Press (May 17, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1843833069
  • ISBN-13: 978-1843833062
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,426,805 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This must surely be the definitive study of Crécy for many years to come; but it is much more than that. It is the narrative of a fourteenth century army at war. Impressive in its scholarship, immaculately presented, it is an essential item in a medievalist's library. --Casemate

Essays of very high quality. (...) A very fine, scholarly study and eminently readable book which deserves great authority as a study of Crécy. --History

A useful addition to the literature and worth reading by anyone with any interest in its topic. --Journal of Military History

About the Author

Dr ANDREW AYTON is senior lecturer in history at the University of Hull. Sir Philip Preston is an independent scholar, and founding secretary of the Battle of Crécy Trust, which is dedicated to research into the battle and all matters relating to it. He is a partner in an architectural practice, and lives in Crécy-en-Ponthieu, where he is vice president of the local archaeological society.

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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kevin G. Smyth on February 20, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The Battle of Crecy, 1346 follows in a gathering library of recent scholarly examination of the Hundred Years War. It is a literature that questions our assumptions about battle in the middle ages, and particularly this momentous conflict between England and France.

This is a collection of essays, scholarly and at times difficult for the casual history reader to scale. However it so questions our previous understanding of this battle, frequently identified as one of the most decisive in history, that is a must read for those interested in a true understanding of Crecy.

The authors question three important assumptions we've come to accept about the battle.

1. Edward III avoided battle with the Philip's superior French army and was forced to fight. Our essayists insist that this was a battle Edward sought, and it was his intention to bring on a decisive action with the French.

2. Crecy was the place Edward was brought to bay, and in a remarkable eye for terrain chose a perfectly sited battlefield. The authors assert that Edward knew the region of Ponthieu well, and likely had the site of the battlefield in mind as he drew the pursuing French after him.

3. Most intriguing to me is a new look at the battlefield. Prior historians of Crecy have presumed that the French ordered their attacks from the eastern slope and across the length of the Vallee de Clercs into the face of archers and men at arms on the western slope. Sir Philip Preston's essay claims that this was impossible due to the steep slope on the eastern side of the valley. It was much more likely that the French army entered through the narrow, but accessible southern neck of the valley and were annihilated in a narrow killing zone.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Donovan, Editor/Sr. Reviewer on March 18, 2006
Format: Hardcover
In August 1346 the French royal army was defeated by an expeditionary force from England: an event which marked the turning point in the English king's struggle with his French adversary and lent the English army a reputation as the best fighters in Europe. Military history fans will relish THE BATTLE OF CRECY, 1346: it explains the politics on both sides, the meaning of the battle to both sides, and how the English achieved victory. It reviews and re-interprets the battle and provides the latest scholarly research on the era. While a specialty item, THE BATTLE OF CRECY 1346 is a highly recommended acquisition for any in-depth, definitive military history collection.
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By eagerreader on July 30, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very smooth transaction
Content : If the battle ended undecided, as far as warfare is concerned it annonced the decline and end of medieval tactics.
Agreable reading
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By Richard Mowbray on February 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is truly a definitive book on the subject of the early portion of the Hundred Years War.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Murena Jr. on January 30, 2006
Format: Hardcover
So why is the battle of Crecy, a one day battle that happened in 1346, so interesting today? Well I conjecture that it is not so much that its just that longbows are better than crossbows or that the English got the upper hand in a seemingly hopeless situation but that a mix of revolutionary technology a little inginuity and a lot of luck drives at something deeper within us. But the battle itself was brilliantly documented by the chronicler Jean Froissart and his account provides not only a great account of a very successfully executed battle on the part of the English but an excellent account of how war was fought in the high middle ages. This book explores this and really brings the battle to life by setting up the situation in a tactical matter and attempting to understand the mechanics of the battle.

While the english did have the high ground in open but jagged ground they also forced the French through an approach that made them an easier target. Any tactitian understand the importance of funnelling your enemy. This was enacted beautifully. Then comes the archers - The Genoese fighting fo the french with their beatifully crafted crossbows were matched against the english longbowmen. While the longbow was simpler it certainly still required expert craftsmanship. The range on the longbow was superior and the the speed was too. But research shows in this book that the Genoese Crossbowman werent totally useless as a fighting force. But they forgot their sheilds and after retreating got hacked to bits not by the english but by the French.

This is a work of history that is probably not for the causal reader but by the student of history or military science. The book sheds new light on a well known battle and really is interesting as it dissects the chronicles brings in applied science aspects of terrain and tries to answer what really went on in 1346.

Ted Murena
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