Qty:1
  • List Price: $22.99
  • Save: $2.71 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Battling the Inner Dummy: The Craziness of Apparently Normal People Paperback – October 1, 1999


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.28
$3.84 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

Battling the Inner Dummy: The Craziness of Apparently Normal People + Reality Check: What Your Mind Knows, But Isn't Telling You + Power Freaks: Dealing With Them in the Workplace or Anyplace
Price for all three: $54.25

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 466 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books; 1st edition (October 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1573927473
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573927475
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #622,399 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Drawing on evolutionary psychology theories, imaginary meetings with Sigmund Freud, and a fictitious advertising agency, popular psychology writer Weiner weaves a logical and understandable explanation of why apparently normal people sometimes behave in a totally irrational manner. His collaborator, psychiatrist Hefter (Northwestern Medical Sch.), gives a short, academic-oriented commentary at the end of each chapter. Weiner brings into play Freud's premise that the "id" is what causes people to commit foolish, irrational, and even horrendous acts; he labels this part of the brain the "Inner Dummy." This refreshing book is both interesting and readable; the use of Freud as a literary device adds to the book's uniqueness and value. Highly recommended for popular psychology collections in public and academic libraries.AElizabeth Goeters, Georgia Perimeter Coll., Dunwoody
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

In this informative, entertaining, and well-researched book, Weiner explores why it is that people do irrational and compulsive things, sometimes against their better judgment. He intersperses his text with an imaginary conversation with Sigmund Freud, engaged in an advertising campaign to market his concept of the id, or Inner Dummy. The Freud device is meant to simplify the psychiatric concepts of id, ego, and superego, but Weiner does a fine job of that himself. The book is meant to explore the "underlying causes and nature of irrational, neurotic outlooks in a way that would be comprehensible to most of us." Weiner examines a range of irrational behavior, from that of President Clinton in the Monica Lewinski affair to the murderous activities of Slobodan Milosevic and Adolf Hitler. We all have some sort of personality disorder, some better managed or concealed than others, according to Weiner. He also examines treatments for personality disorders. Coauthor Hefter, a clinical psychiatrist, offers commentary at the end of each chapter. Vanessa Bush

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
David Weiner has put together a truly entertaining book which answers the question,"What place in a person's mind allows generally reasonable people to do generally universally agreed upon unreasonable things?"
Well researched, this book looks at real world examples, knowing the reader applies them to themselves and to the people, they know.
Great chapters outline the base "limbic drives" present in all people. This mix of limbic drives is what powers our personalities and our actions, and this book offers explanations and a scorecard to see where the reader falls with regard to "average" behaviors. In the end, you have a better understanding of personality and actions, and a solid knowledge of the Inner Dummy in all of us.
GREAT READING !
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By DRG on February 28, 2000
Format: Paperback
A friend and I were discussing President Clinton's foibles when I asked, "What was he thinking?" My friend said, "Funny you should say that" and recommended Dave Weiner's book. Psychoanalysis is not my thing, however, I found "Battling the Inner Dummy" to be an enjoyable and stimulating read that provides an interesting perspective as to why seemingly intelligent and rational people do stupid things. I really liked the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Rachel on August 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is horrible. Mr. Weiner's writing style is hackneyed at best. He drives each point home relentlessly with an astounding number of examples. He uses a couple of gimmicks I found unbearable: First, his painfully detailed recreations of conversations he had with various individuals under the guise of collecting data for his book, but actually serve to showcase the breadth of Mr. Weiner's knowledge, and ability to annoy. Second, the ridiculous chapters in which makes Dr. Freud a character in this madness. This book had about three to ten pages worth of useful information - the rest of the book is all padding and nonsense.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
David Weiner has put together an altogether entertaining book defining what makes up our minds and our personalities. And what drives people to do the things they do.
In today's age where someone goes on national television, and says, "I want to Marry a Millionaire," this book offers incredible insight into what shapes extraordinary events in the mind.
Weiner's book is well researched,and offers many opportunities for self-analysis. It is a fun book to read and to pass. The analysis of the limbid drives will well illustrate personality traits in the reader and in people the reader knows. It asks the question, "What is Normal, Am I Normal, Are my Friends Normal?"
Just a blast to read!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Donna Czukla on June 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
Throughout our lives we have seen people doing things that we thought were senseless. Whether they were people in our workplace, people in government or close friends. After reading David Weiner's book, you realize that their "Inner Dummy" made them do it. They really can't control the senseless things they do because they don't know they are doing them. After reading "Battling the Inner Dummy" you are more tolerant of these "Dummy" captured people...and you try to control your own "Inner Dummy."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 16, 1999
Format: Paperback
I cannot recommend Battling the Inner Dummy by David Weiner enough. This is an absolutely terrific book. Enormously inventive, erudite and playful at the same time, it brings some much needed analysis to a subject that has lain in the hinterland for far too long. I also have to say that he does a much better job than I have done in How To Manage Your Dimensionally Interactive Cyber Kinetics of portraying the peneteration of our intellectual and emotional lives by our most irrational components. I give this book five stars.
The most astonishing thing about this book is that the conclusions implicit in Freud have never been fully and constructively exploited by social thinkers. This book puts some elements of the libidinally infested academic community to shame. Sean O'Reilly Editor at-Large Travelers' Tales
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Heather on May 3, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book does an amazing job in telling us how our minds really work. I have found most books on this subject to be tedious and difficult to read. But because Weiner keeps the writing lively and entertaining as well as informative, and intersperses his text with an imaginary and imaginative sub-plot involving Sigmund Freud, the book makes for a great read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Robertson on June 7, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Did you know that the human brain has been analyzed as having three compartments? According to this analysis, the innermost brain, inherited from our reptilian ancestors, houses the most basic instincts. The next layer, inherited from our earliest mammalian ancestors, is called the limbic system. This section houses the emotions. The outermost layer, developed still later, is called the neocortex. This section houses our higher thinking skills.
If you didn't know that before, do you understand it now? If so, then you have just read pages 38 and 39 of "Battling the Inner Dummy." So you know all the author has to say about the triune brain.
Throughout the rest of the book, the author talks about everything under the sun. One chapter is an introductory course on Abnormal Psychology. Another chapter introduces us to the Theory of Relativity. In three more chapters, we get an overview of psychotherapy techniques. For reasons known only to himself, the author devises 10-point scales for various personality traits. There is also an extended scenario in which Freud comes back as a consultant for an advertising campaign. You might find it entertaining, you might think it's kyootsee-kyoot.
Here are some important questions which Weiner gives only a cursory glance:
Why are male heterosexuality and female heterosexuality so different? Men patronize prostitutes and porno magazines, whereas women patronize drugstore novels. A look at our primeval past can answer this question.
Why are people attracted to illegal drugs? Why are people attracted to foods which overdose on sugar, salt, and fat? Probably because such stimuli did not make their appearance soon enough in the history of the human brain.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews