Buy Used
$3.81
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Battling for Peace:: A Memoir Hardcover – May 10, 1995


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$6.85 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 350 pages
  • Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (May 10, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0679436170
  • ISBN-13: 978-0679436171
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6.8 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,805,839 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this hopeful autobiographical memoir, Israel's current foreign minister discusses his behind-the-scenes negotiations that helped cement the 1993 Israeli-Palestinian accord, for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1994. Born in 1923 in Poland, Peres followed his family to Palestine in the 1930s after his father, a lumber merchant, was forced out of business by punitive tax assessments. He writes about his formative years on a kibbutz and his role as head of arms procurement for the new Israeli army, providing a firsthand account of the birth of Israel. Peres, defense minister in the 1970s and later Israel's prime minister, uses diary excerpts to recreate his orchestration of Israel's rescue of passengers on a French plane hijacked by PLO terrorists and flown to Entebbe, Uganda, in 1976. He also settles scores with political rivals Golda Meir and Yitzhak Rabin (in whose government he currently serves) and reveals that in 1987 he held secret talks with King Hussein of Jordan in London to launch a peace conference without the PLO?an aborted plan whose failure he blames on U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz. Photos not seen by PW. Author tour.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

An entertaining memoir by a politician seems an oxymoron. But beyond his active role in Israel's--and world--history for more than 50 years, Peres is a gifted storyteller, able to sketch in a few lines the remarkable figures who enliven his narrative: Ben-Gurion and Meir, Dayan and Begin, Mitterrand, Brandt, and Kreisky, and various U.S. leaders. Peres adeptly deploys humanizing details--why, as a kibbutz herder, he preferred sheep over cows or how Dimona in the Negev Desert was prepared for the nuclear reactor Peres had convinced France to sell Israel--to tie details of arms procurement and political infighting to more mundane realities. His story is rich in drama: war and intifada, terrorism and the Entebbe raid, Irangate and "the long search for peace," for which Peres shared the 1994 Nobel Peace Prize with Yasser Arafat of the PLO. Battling for Peace responds calmly to ugly charges against Peres in Labor Party rival Yitzhak Rabin's 1979 autobiography, but harshly criticizes Likud leaders Begin--for failing to control Ariel Sharon's tactics in Lebanon--and Yitzhak Shamir (Summing Up, 1994) for destroying a hopeful opening toward peace that Peres negotiated in 1987 with King Hussein of Jordan. Insider's history at its best. Mary Carroll

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
1
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "sharplawyer" on December 24, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Is Israel's perennial loser perhaps a winner after all? It is said that people take comfort from the setbacks of others and after his failure to win any election making him PM it would be easy to write off Shimon Peres.
His autobiography "Battling for Peace" shows how a very ambitious politician uses reverses to strengthen his political backbone.
Peres describes his early childhood in Poland, his emigration to Palestine and his political progress which started even while he was on a Kibbutz.
Peres has been at the core of world politics for half a century and has met all other leaders of significance and his pen portraits especially of Mitterand Nixon and Clinton are most entertaining.
The Olso process is reported in detail and this book is a must for anybody who wishes to acquaint temselves with the twisting currents of events in the Middle East.
The book is obviously only an interim Report as it predates Rabins assassination.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By givbatam3 on November 19, 2006
Format: Hardcover
It was the murdered Yitzhak Rabin who described his perenniel

rival and sometimes partner, Shimon Peres, the best:

"the inveterate underminer" (quoted from Rabin's autobiography).

Peres is the quientessential politician who has no charisma

or ideas of his own, but who works hard, harder than any

of his rivals, and through endless intrigues,

makes sure to place people loyal to him in positions of

power and influence, so that when the time comes and he decides

to make his move for power, those who oppose him are strongarmed

(or worse) out of his way.

Peres played a major role in building Israel's defense establishment

and defense industries, and in addition served an outstanding

term as Prime Minister in the years 1984-1986, but this wasn't enough for his immense ego.

He wanted international recognition as a "statesman", and in

a world largely hostile to the idea of a "Jewish State", he

came to realize that true international approbriation comes NOT to Israelis

like Ben-Gurion, Eshkol or Golda Meir, who built up Israel, but rather

to those who begin to dismantle it. It truly galled him that his

Likud opposite number Menachem Begin won the so-called Nobel "Peace" Prize

for destroying Jewish communities in the Sinai and giving up Israel's only supply of oil to Sadat who had no intention of honoring his "Peace" agreement with Israel, so he decided to outdo Begin by bringing mass-murderer Yasser Arafat and his terrorist gangs to Israel, giving them money, weapons, and territory from which to attack Israel.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?