Beach Red 1967 NR

Amazon Instant Video

(28) IMDb 6.4/10
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The American assault and capture of a Japanese-held island in the Pacific during World War II.

Starring:
Cornel Wilde, Rip Torn
Runtime:
1 hour, 44 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Beach Red

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama
Director Cornel Wilde
Starring Cornel Wilde, Rip Torn
Supporting actors Burr DeBenning, Patrick Wolfe, Jean Wallace, Jaime Sánchez, Dale Ishimoto, Genki Koyama, Gene Blakely, Michael Parsons, Norman Pak, Dewey Stringer, Fred Galang, Hiroshi Kiyama, Michio Hazama, Linda Albertano, Masako Ohtsuki, Jan Garrison, George Bayot, Ed Finlan
Studio MGM
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

After watching about 15 minutes, my son asked "how much longer is this"?
Dufus
This movie that I had never heard of instantly joined my top ten list for great war films.
Tommy
This is a really good film with a start of the action without waiting half an hour.
Rick Lane

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

39 of 44 people found the following review helpful By mackjay on April 21, 2005
Format: DVD
**May Contain Spoilers**

After seeing BEACH RED, many viewers are likely to ask how they have missed this film all this time, and why they have not heard about it before. It's pretty likely that this movie never truly got its due because it was released in 1967 at the height of the Vietnam War. The public was probably too 'burnt out' on TV war coverage to want to go see a war film in a theater. That's just a theory.

Seeing this film after Terence Malick's great THE THIN RED LINE (1998) can create a startling effect. It's possible that Malick knew BEACH RED, and was inspired by some of its techniques, or it may be just a coincidence. The use of voice-over to hear character's thoughts was probably something quite new in 1967, and the Pacific island setting is nearly as lush and sensually appealing as it is in the Malick film. Both films make use of the natural beauty of the surroundings to contrast with the harsh dramatic setting. And both films are unflinching in their depiction of the suffering that combat can bring, both physical and emotional. Early in, we see "Mouse" a soldier paralyzed with fear, who repeats "Please, oh please" over and over. It's very striking to see Wilde's film portray a crying or fearful young soldier in such an objective way. The fate of "Mouse" is also graphically, unsparingly depicted. This sequence occurs in the first 15 minutes, and the rest of the film contains many equally strong scenes, for both US soldiers and Japanese. There is an effective, if sometimes crude, use of flashback to reveal the men's emotional backgrounds. The film seems to make a definite point of not favoring Americans over Japanese at the basic human level, and this is greatly to its credit.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By John Johanson on February 27, 2005
Format: DVD
I saw the theatrical release of the film Beach Red in 1967 with my father, who served as an infantryman in the Pacific in WWII. He thought Beach Red was the most authentic depiction of the combat he experienced (although he did not see The Thin Red Line, which he might have liked).
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin E. Cressy on April 20, 2005
Format: DVD
I would assume that anyone looking at this DVD already knows the nature of the film. The plot is simple: Marines invade an island in the Pacific, and find it held by fanatical Japanese troops. It's an honest and unflinching look at jungle warfare.

MGM has finally released this classic on DVD, and the presentation is very good for the price you pay. The film was shot full-frame and this pan-and-scan transfer is available on one side. On the other is a false widescreen transfer. For theatrical release, the image was simply cropped (black bars are placed over the top and bottom of the image; nothing is added to the sides. You lose more with the letterbox than you gain). The image quality is pristine.

I heartily enjoy BEACH RED; I think it is one of the greatest war films ever produced. While the DVD extras are minimal, there is not much that can be done with a B-film from 1967, I suppose. Buy it today.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Tommy on February 19, 2006
Format: DVD
For a movie shot in the 60's, I was amazed at how well made this film is. There is none of the "Hurrah! Let's move out, men!" flag waving nonsense that many similiar films had in the 50's and 60's. This movie is a hardcore look at the horrors of war...for both sides. Shot in a documentary style, Beach Red starts off with a Marine landing and storming of the beach. After the Marines make their way into the jungle, they must eliminate machine gun nests and snipers. As our troops continue into the heart of the island, we begin to see flashbacks of their home life before the war. Terrance Malick's The Thin Red Line borrowed heavily from this movie (this film is actually more graphic). This movie that I had never heard of instantly joined my top ten list for great war films. I also rented Ambush Bay the same week and enjoyed that one as well (for different reasons of course). I hope MGM has some more hidden WW2 treasures out there.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Joseph P. Ulibas VINE VOICE on June 27, 2005
Format: DVD
Beach Red is finally out on video. One of the best films about World War II and it's made by people who were there.

This movie was produced by film companies from Japan, U.S.A. and the Philipines. Cornell Wilde stars and directs this film that inspired The Thin Red Line remake and Saving Private Ryan. Rip Torn co-stars as a battle harden sergant who uses unorthodox techniques to get information from his p.o.w.s. A grim film that was way ahead of it's time. Terrance Mallick must have really loved this movie, The Thin Red Line is virtually a remake. Go out and get the extended version of Big Red One as well, Two highly underrated films about World War II.

I guarantee full satisfaction.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Cordell on March 9, 2011
Format: DVD
While it may not have the best cinemagraphics, acting or research, I went to see Beach Red as a high school senior by myself one Friday evening in 1968. I had an older buddy killed in VietNam and was seriously considering enlisting with the idea of going over and wasting some ***** for my pal. Up until that time, the war movies I saw had all glorified combat. Wounded men never screamed for their mothers, blood did not splatter and only or two of the good guys were killed - usually dying after weakly instructing their pals to fight on. I never thought of the other side as having families of their own. My in-laws are from the Philippines and remember the Japanese occupation. My sister-in-law characterizes the Japanese soldiers she encountered as young boys who were mostly scared and did not want to be there. I remember being horrified by the blood and carnage in the first 15 minutes and seriously considered getting up and leaving. However I stayed and watched the whole thing - leaving with some real questions about my desire to enlist. Now my adolescent view may have been colored by my lack of exposure to better films but this movie changed my life more than any other film I have ever seen. It increased my respect for those fellows who went through combat - on both sides. I am writing this review after placing an order for this film. It may not be the best but I owe it a great deal.
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