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The Bead Jewelry Book Paperback – March 1, 1999


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Paperback, March 1, 1999
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (March 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0809228033
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809228034
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.4 x 10.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #516,939 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stefany Tomalin, the owner of one of the world's finest bead shops, researchers, exhibits, and lectures in the United States and the United Kingdom. She has written numerous features, articles, and reviews for popular and specialist craft publications.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 49 people found the following review helpful By sandy807 VINE VOICE on September 12, 2002
Having just received this bead jewelry book, I'm very disappointed! I find nothing here to inspire me, and I would rate this book a 1 if it weren't for the good research the author's done on types of beads and materials used in jewelry. Here's what I found in this book; maybe you will see more value in it than I do:
The majority of the book is taken up with descriptions, histories, meanings of beads and materials. There is a section on materials from nature, and necklaces are shown of chicken bones, chili peppers, dried oranges, leaves, etc. A couple pages on shells describes how to cut, file, and drill them for threading. There's a section on how to discern between real and fake materials like coral, amber, jet, ivory, pearls etc. Chapters on metal beads and glass beads spend many pages describing how they are made. A short chapter on polymer clay beads shows examples of items made with them, but gives instructions for only one of the examples.
A following chapter is on the history of jewelry styles in the U.S. throughout the 20th century. Quite a few pictures are shown, but instructions for very few of them are given. The next chapters focus on specific jewelry styles i.e., the liberty necklace, chokers, lacy collar types, and pendants. Although many pictures are shown, some fairly attractive, only one necklace of each photographic display has instructions.
The instructions for the projects are interspersed throughout these chapters, mixed in with the history, etc. of the bead types and styles. For the most part, they are written instructions, rarely accompanied by diagrams, which I think are generally more useful than wordy explanations.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By Christine Saalbach on April 21, 2000
Stefany has gone and done it again. Like her earlier book, Beads!, she presents many ideas and techniques, but you can easily see how people's interest in beads has increased in these last ten years. Her layout, sprinkled liberally with sharp photographs by Maggie Campbell Pederson, flows smoothly and invites you ever forward in your study. Stefany does not leave you wondering about the beads in the photos, but clearly labels each piece that is pictured.
Stefany begins in her first chapter by describing beads made from natural materials. The second chapter opens with the work of glass bead artists, then moves on to metal, clay and decorated beads. Techniques and styles of beadwork are in the third chapter, then the fourth chapter is devoted to collectible beads.
The techniques Stefany presents are about the only repetition from the older book Beads! that there are in The Bead Jewelry Book, so I would not discourage you from having both books in your personal library. Start saving your chicken bones; page 13 will show you what to do with them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By S. Sur on July 1, 2010
In the mid 1990ies when beading became popular, there were few books around. At the time this was one of two books by this famous author and bead historian.

Now a new beading book comes out every day practically. So the contents of this book are not the latest rage. Imagine a book without lots of Japanese seed bead projects!

It is more about historic, ethnic beads, large beads, handmade uneven beads, and classics. This book would appeal more to collectors, and bead historians than new beaders who are into Austrian crystals, and 3D seed beading projects that are very popular now.

A practical set of suggestions for combining bead colors is on page 119 "Designing with Colour in Bead Jewellery" section. (Yes, the author is British and uses British spellings.) I found this helpful as a beginning beader.
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