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The Beardstown Ladies' Common-Sense Investment Guide: How We Beat the Stock Market - And How You Can Too Paperback – January 25, 1996

2.5 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Beardstown Ladies-16 older women from a small town in Illinois-present the investment secrets that have allowed their club to substantially outperform professional money managers.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

Over the past ten years, the Beardstown Ladies Investment Club has produced an impressive average annual return of 23 percent. The key to its investment success is summarized in a single page in the book: members depend heavily on Value Line rankings and apply some fundamental analysis to their stock selections. The 16 women club members, who include a secretary, a school principal, and a hog farmer and who range in age from 41 to 82, also discuss management practices that contribute to running a successful investment club. Since many clubs fail, their practical advice might be useful to others considering such a venture, though guidance is available from other sources. The one-page biographies of the club members together with their favorite recipes adds little to the minimal value of this book.
Joseph Barth, U.S. Military Acad. Lib., West Point, N.Y.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; 1st edition (January 25, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786881208
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786881208
  • Product Dimensions: 5.7 x 0.6 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #511,019 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on November 6, 1999
Format: Paperback
The folksy advice sounds too good to be true--and it is. How couldn't someone--anyone--have seen that the so-called "returns" on investment are rigged? The media waited too long to expose the fact that the authors included club fees in figuring how they supposedly "beat the market." In fact, the market beat THEM. Don't waste your time or money.
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Format: Paperback
News reports are now saying that the Beardstown Ladies club annual investment returns were under 10%, rather than over 20%, because of a mistaken calculation. Whopping blunders are not the way to inspire confidence in their advice.
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By A Customer on August 22, 1999
Format: Paperback
Ok, the ladies did get people interested in investing, but they really screwed up in the end. I can't believe that they still do speaking engagements about investing--to me, they're the Milli Vanillies of the investment world!
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Format: Paperback
While mutual-fund managers (who manage other people's money) are forced to disclose their actual returns with periodic audits from established accounting firms, "investment advisors" are free to make up numbers to sell their advice. The implicit message behind every investment book (Buffett, Lynch, et al) is the unspoken promise: "If you think about investment as I do, you, too can earn my spectacular returns."
Buffett and Lynch earned the right to toot their own horn -- having beaten the general index over decades. The Beardstown Ladies' dirty little secret is that they "accidently" included their monthly dues into their total returns of their fund. If a mutual fund manager did this with his 12b-1s he'd be in jail. Skip the book and go for Peter Lynch.
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By A Customer on May 10, 1998
Format: Paperback
While the falsity of the Beardstown Ladies' 23.4% annual return has been well-publicized, there are other, less-noticed clues in the book that the authors simpply can't do math. There is a reference to an 88% over 16 months, or "66% annualized." But an 88% return in 16 months corresponds to 61% annually. Worse, they report a 72% loss on a stock over 2.5 years, or a 29% annual loss. But 72% over 2.5 years annualizes to 40%. This is high school math. Furthermore, their claim to be fundamental analysts is deceptive. They define fundamental analysis largely as looking up stock price statistics in ValueLine.
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Format: Paperback
Don't bother with this one...strip away the arterey clogging recipes and you've got at most 100 pages of blather written by a ghost writer who knows nothing of investing. Also as is old news by now, this group massively underperformed the market.
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By A Customer on March 22, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I don't see anybody mentioning the recently revealed 'mistake' in Beardstown Ladies calculations. Their REAL annualized yield was not 23+ % but a much more modest 9 %. You could be better off with an S&P index fund
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Format: Paperback
If you are planning to read this book to learn about some "Beardstown Ladies magical formula to beating stock market", then forget it. This book is not for you.

"The Beardstown Ladies Common-Sense Investment Guide" is a self-glorifying book by the "Beardstown Ladies", about the "Beardstown Ladies". In brief, this book is all about how some small town ladies got lucky in the stock market.

In no way can this book be considered a "Investment Guide". Most of the ideas presented in this book are self evident and already known to the general public. There are no specifics on how much they made but based on some of the numbers quoted, it does not look like they made millions or anything close to it. Again the pompous ladies have quoted just the beginning and ending numbers, so it might seem that they got good overall returns, but if you try to find the compounded rate of returns, it turns out to be mere few points above or close to the market and that too over a not so long period.

The book just talks about its so called "great" successes. But fails to tell any of their failures.

This book should probably have been renamed as "Beardstown Ladies book of recipes".

All you can take from this book is ... If some small town ladies can make "some" money in the market, you too can :-)

-Sachin
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