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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used copy withdrawn from library circulation. In general good condition but may contain markings on the cover, along the page edges and on the title page/endpaper indicating library/withdrawn status. Paperbacks are generally laminated, Hardcovers generally include a protective dust jacket cover.
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Bears Hardcover – May 24, 2005


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Hardcover: 24 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; First Edition edition (May 24, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 006027994X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060279943
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 9.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,088,249 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

PreS-K. Before Sendak's early collaborations with Ruth Krauss, she wrote a simple picture book called Bears (1948), using only 26 words that were illustrated in black and brown by Phyllis Rowand. Now, Sendak uses the same 26 words (changing their order slightly and adding a few more in speech balloons) and illustrates them in more complex and colorful pictures to entertain another generation. The old artwork focused on the bears and their activities mentioned in the text, but the new illustrations add a dramatic subplot and a human element: a distinctively Sendakian human who looks a lot like Max in his wolf suit. This being Sendak, there is also a dog, here stealing a teddy bear and leading the boy on a merry chase through the rest of the book. And there are two visual elements that probably only Sendak could get away with: a teddy bear hung by the neck on the dedication page (rescued by his theatrically tearful owner) and a character smoking. The drawings are expressive and the tone is generally- playful-, though with a dark undertone. The relative complexity of the illustrations takes the book beyond the very young audience of the original edition. In fact, the whole drama may be best appreciated by an older audience, one that knows Sendak's other books and will enjoy a reprise of beloved, familiar elements. Carolyn Phelan
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

About the Author

Ruth Krauss (1901-1993) is the author of over thirty books for children, including the classics The Carrot Seed, illustrated by her husband, Crockett Johnson, and A Hole Is to Dig, illustrated by Maurice Sendak. "Ruth Krauss's intuitive ability as a writer to capture the free-spirited thought processes and laughter of young children ensures her books' widespread acceptance and timeless appeal." So concludes her entry in children's Books and Their Creators (1995).



In addition to Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak's books include Kenny's Window, Very Far Away, The Sign on Rosie's Door, Nutshell Library (consisting of Chicken Soup with Rice, Alligators All Around, One Was Johnny, and Pierre), Higglety Pigglety Pop! or There Must Be More to Life, In the Night Kitchen, Outside Over There, We Are All in the Dumps with Jack and Guy, and Bumble-Ardy.

He received the 1964 Caldecott Medal for Where the Wild Things Are; the 1970 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration; the 1983 Laura Ingalls Wilder Award, given by the American Library Association in recognition of his entire body of work; and a 1996 National Medal of Arts in recognition of his contribution to the arts in America. In 2003, he received the first Astrid Lindgren Memorial Award, an international prize for children's literature established by the Swedish government.


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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Two very different sensibilities.
Tia
Always something neat to look at while the book is being read aloud.
Melissa Sack
Simple rhymes, lots of bears to look at and fun to read aloud.
A. Rothrock

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on March 10, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Trust Maurice Sendak to remain mischievous well into his old age. When somebody somewhere proposed that he reillustrate Ruth Krauss's classic and bizarre 1948 title, "Bears", he could have done so without so much as a whimper. Instead, right on the title page, one of the first things you see is a bear hanging by a noose. BANG! Parents who are going to be shocked are shocked and parents who are pretty well aware that kids don't detect any difference between nooses and plain old ropes are nonplussed. The wheat has been separated from the chaff from the very beginning and by the time you've gotten to page 3 you know that you are deep into Sendak's brain without any turning back. "Bears" wasn't without controversy when it first came out, of course. In his book, "Dear Genius"* author Leonard S. Marcus points out that, "Some critics found this picture book, with its nonnarrative, singsong text...bewilderingly offbeat and insubstantial". Now Sendak's given it a narrative and it stars one of his best-known creations. Bizarre, funny, and overwhelmingly bearable (ho ho), the book is sure to be beloved by some and abhorred by others.

It's Max! The hero from "Where the Wild Things Are", is back and he's going to bed. Only thing is, as he goes to retire with his faithful dog at his side he sees that somebody (the grinning pup seems a likely culprit) has hung Max's favorite teddy from the ceiling. Max rescues his toy and is just snuggling down to sleep with it (as a jealous man's-best-friend looks on) when the dog finds he cannot take it anymore and runs off with Max's stuffed bear. What ensues is a chase as Max pursues his dog, stumbling all the while past odd bear-related scenes and images. He runs past them "On the stairs", and "Under chairs".
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By LadyHawk on March 29, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
We had this book back in the late 70's/early 80's and I loved it then. It's best for young toddlers just learning to read. It has very simple (usually 2 or 3 word) sentences that rhyme with "bears" about what the bears are doing in each picture. I rediscovered it online and wanted to get a copy for my little girls, what I didn't know was that Maurice Sendak has re-illustrated the book. I purchased a used copy that was (I thought) supposed to be the one in the picture, illustrated by Phyllis Rowand. I was very unhappy when I got the one illustrated by Maurice Sendak. The original art had cute little teddy bears, Sendak's version is, frankly, quite creepy. Even my husband, who likes dark stuff, was creeped out.

So I highly recommend this book for toddlers, but make sure it's the one illustrated by Phyllis Rowand!! Double check with the seller which one they have on hand first.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pea 'the Grumpy' Tee TOP 500 REVIEWER on January 29, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Wow, it's not very often that you see a little teddy bear hanging from a noose in a children's book. As a mom of a girl and boy (5 and 3) I was aghast. I mean, who wants to answer the their children when they ask, 'mommy, what is that teddy doing on that rope?'

Still Ruth Krauss and Sendak... I thought I'd take a further look. But my goodness. Like a bad movie that they try to make 'better' with a host of over-the-top stars, this just isn't all that good.

My children thought the artwork was okay, but they weren't grabbed by the text. I read it twice myself before I realized that there just wasn't a story or anything particularly interesting going on.

Bears, bears, bears, bears, bears
On the Stairs
Under chairs
Washing hairs
Giving stares
Collecting fares
Stepping in squares
Millionaires
Bears, bears, bears, bears, bears
everywheres
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A. Rothrock on February 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is a great book that my two-year old loves. Simple rhymes, lots of bears to look at and fun to read aloud. Definitely recommended.
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By T. Holloway on August 24, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Simply written and excellently illustrated by Maurice Sendak, we get a preview of Max and the boy who will become king of the Wild Things in another incarnation. But the first Max is very like the wilder one Max to come. Using this for a first grade literature study.
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