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Beasts Men and Gods Paperback – July 28, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Book Jungle (July 28, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1605979929
  • ISBN-13: 978-1605979922
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,907,576 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Antoni Ferdynand Ossendowski (May 27, 1876 - January 3, 1945) was a Polish writer, journalist, traveler, globetrotter, explorer and university professor. He is best known for his books about Lenin and the Russian Civil War, a war in which he took part. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By New Age of Barbarism on January 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
_Beasts, Men and Gods_, reprinted by Kessinger Publishing, is Ferdinand Ossendowski's fascinating account of his adventures and travels in northern Asia; Siberia, Mongolia, Tibet, and China, in an effort to flee the Red army of the Russian revolution. Dr. Ossendowski was a scientist and writer who lived for a time in Siberia when the Russian revolution broke out. It came about that he became suspected of being a counter-revolutionary and thus had to flee his home one day into the forests. There he began his adventures as related in this book, where he met up first with a murderer and later with various peasants along the way. Eventually, Ossendowski joined the White forces in Mongolia who opposed the revolution and the Bolsheviki. Much of the book is spent relating the various political events that occur in the "heart of Asia" involving Russia, China, Mongolia, and Tibet, and the relations between these nations. The book becomes interesting however when Ossendowski begins to relate the tales of the Buddhist religion of Mongolia. He encounters many of the Lamas, holy pontiffs, and doctors of this religion and relates tales of the Dalai Lama in Lhasa in Tibet, as well as tales of various fortune tellers, poisoners, and soothsayers. Ossendowski also encounters "the Living Buddha", the King of Mongolia, who has become blind through excessive drinking. The Living Buddha is chosen from among the peasants as the incarnation of the Living Buddha in a child (his soul having passed into another body after the death of the previous Living Buddha) and this child is taken to be reared by the Lamas. The Living Buddha relates a special prophecy for all of Asia, which Ossendowski records.Read more ›
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Bearcat on September 2, 2005
Format: Paperback
He writes about his actual adventures trying to stay alive during the Russian Revolution. The things he experienced are incredible, and offer a fantastic first-hand view of Russia and Siberia during those tragic times.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Sergey Radchenko on April 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
Ossendowski offers a healthy combination of facts and fantasy in his absorbing account of adventures and misadventures in Russia and Mongolia. So much has been said and written about Beasts, Men and Gods - what is to be added?

First, his worldview: read for a thorough anti-Bolshevik perspective on the Russian revolution;

Second, his fascination with Buddhism and the ideas of pan-Asianism, which he shares with Ungern.

Thirdly, a keen eye for Asia's promising prospects; in his philosophical discourse Ossendowski warns about the imminent rise of "Asia" as a mighty opponent to Old Europe.

Ossendowski's discussion of the life and times of the Mongols is very perceptive; his description of the customs of the people, lamaist religious practices, etc - is very detailed and interesting.

Of course, his glorious adventures in Tibet and Mongolia should be taken with a grain of salt, while the whole last part about the underground "King of the World" might interest mystics, though even this part offers a glimpse into the Mongolian society with its remarkable fusion of beliefs and superstitions.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John Alexander Anderson on March 3, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is the tale told by a Polish Colonel in the Russian Army (Tsarist White Army) who is escaping from Vladivostok and making his way through Siberia and into Mongolia. It is a monumental journey both in the amount of time he will have to spend, and avoiding the Bolshevik forces along the way. Anyone who thinks that the Bolsheviks had the support of all the Russians should read this. It dispels any notions about bloodshed and slaughter among their armies. Ossendowski recounts that each day, you awoke with the understanding that you never knew how many hours you had left to live. The characters he encounters, how his knowledge of military strategy, his background in diplomacy and languages and the luck of being at the right places at the right time allow him to make it to Urga (now Ulan Bator) where he meets up with Baron von Untgen. The bloodiness of the White Russian generals, the Chinese Nationalist army, the Mongolian forces led by their cavalry and lamas and the Bolsheviks makes this a fascinating journal. Many parts were taken from actual facts and turned into a fictional tale, but it is based on actual events.

I know that after he makes his way out of Asia, he traveled from the Philippine Islands to Vancouver, BC and then to Seattle. He went from there to New York where he met with men who would publish this book and then left for Poland. He was still a wanted man by the Red Army's NKVD (secret police) when they captured Warsaw, he had just died weeks before and they had his body exhumed for identification so they could inform Stalin that he was dead.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paul on December 31, 2007
Format: Paperback
This was a wonderful read. There where elements that were eye-openers for me; first-hand accounts of the slaughter laid to the Russian people by the Bolsheviks, accounts of Buddhist mystics and references to the "Living Buddha", and many flights and narrow escapes throughout. A truly great yarn.
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Format: Unknown Binding Verified Purchase
This book was not what I expected but thoroughly enjoyable & based on historical happenings during the Russian Bolshevik war. A very good accounting of a man caught behind enemy lines & having to fend for himself living off the land, etc.
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