Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Disturbed $5 Off Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Big Savings in the Amazon Fall Sportsman Event Baby Sale

Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity

5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807749609
ISBN-10: 0807749605
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used
$19.99
Buy new
$23.47
More Buying Choices
20 New from $19.41 26 Used from $7.36
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


InterDesign Brand Store Awareness Textbooks
$23.47 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 19 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity + Hip Hop's Li'l Sistas Speak: Negotiating Hip Hop Identities and Politics in the New South (Counterpoints)
Price for both: $64.42

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review


''This book marks the time where our modern literature changes from entertainment to education. A study guide for our next generation using the modern day struggle into manhood and beyond.'' --- M-1, from dead prez

''This is one of the most profound, searching, and insightful studies of what happens to the identities and worldviews of high school students who are exposed to a hip-hop curriculum. With Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life, Hill establishes himself as one of the most gifted young interpreters of hip-hop culture and educational experience in the nation.''
--Michael Eric Dyson, author of Can You Hear Me Now?

About the Author

Marc Lamont Hill is Associate Professor of English Education and Anthropology at Teachers College, Columbia University. He has lectured widely and provides regular commentary for media outlets like NPR, the Washington Post, Essence Magazine, and the New York Times. He is also a political contributor for Fox News Channel, where he appears regularly to provide counterpoint on programs such as The O'Reilly Factor and Hannity & Colmes. Prior to joining Fox News, Dr. Hill was a regular guest on CNN, MSNBC, and CourtTV.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Teachers College Press (May 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807749605
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807749609
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 5.6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #520,046 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Frida Kahlo on February 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
I would really like to like this book. I am having a lot of trouble doing so. It seems problematic that the author defines and appears to teach hip-hop as "authentic Black space" - isn't this essentializing - perhaps leaving out for example, Jamaican Americans and Latino Americans? So many of the examples provided seemed masculinist and essentializing, and yet the author refers to "otherness" so frequently that one would have higher hopes for his inquiry with students. As a reader and fellow educator, I had trouble with Professor Lamont Hill's rather heartless critique of his colleague (in hip-hop curriculum building) as someone who was "not an effective classroom teacher." Hill went on to divulge a story in which other teachers laughed at his idea of collaborating with this colleague, but for some reason Hill went forward with the project. I was then also curious as to why his collaborator was not a co-author. This would seem to warrant some explanation, particularly given that the author is an anthropologist. Hill goes on to posit this collaborator as a sort of Foucaultian "voyeur." What about the authors own voyeurism across cultures and genders - or while addressing topics he chose for this curriculum, such as abortion? As a female, I was especially troubled by the ways in which the author allows male students to speak for themselves via lengthy block quotes as disembodied authorial voices, while Hill himself gives female students fragmented voice along with somewhat objectifying descriptions of their person, their clothing, even their tattoos. There are gender and racial politics here that I wish were addressed more thoroughly.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book! Very captivating view of inner city high school and a teacher who was determined to meet the kids on their own territory.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Arrived Quickly! Great price! Great resource for my classroom!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Sam White on June 19, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Hill's book is a honest description of his efforts to use hip-hop with high school students to get them more engaged with their educations. Hill reveals the challenges of this approach, even for someone like himself who is familiar with hip-hop music. I appreciated Hill's honesty and think that many high school teachers could benefit from the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan on April 2, 2015
Format: Paperback
Very Good!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity
This item: Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity
Price: $23.47
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: teaching