Beautiful Bad Girl and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $1.99 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Mostly Mac
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Ships directly from an Amazon warehouse. Slight shelf wear.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Beautiful Bad Girl: The Vicki Morgan Story Paperback – September 22, 2000


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.96
$17.95 $8.01
Audio, Cassette
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$44.95

Frequently Bought Together

Beautiful Bad Girl: The Vicki Morgan Story + Fatal Charms and Other Tales of Today/The Mansions of Limbo (Omnibus)
Price for both: $30.56

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 324 pages
  • Publisher: iUniverse (September 22, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 059512822X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595128228
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #976,905 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Mesmerizing and filled with powerful lessons." -- Books On Tape

About the Author

Gordon Basichis is a writer, Hollywood producer and an Internet executive. He lives with his wife and son in southern California, the very landscape where Vicki Morgan, Beautiful Bad Girl, shocked the world. Gordons first book was The Constant Travellers, a novel.

More About the Author

Gordon Basichis is the author of "The Blood Orange," a hard edged, modern day romantic mystery thriller in the tradition of classic LA Noir.
He is the author of The Guys Who Spied for China," a roman a clef exposing Chinese espionage networks in the United States, a quarter finalist in Amazon's Breakthrough Novel competition. He is he author of the best selling Beautiful Bad Girl, The Vicki Morgan Story, a non-fiction novel about the international affair between department store scion, Alfred Bloomingdale, and his mistress, Vicki Morgan, that helped define exotic sexuality in the late twentieth century. His first published novel The Constant Travellers, is a metaphysical Western Fantasy that was optioned by two motion picture studios. He has worked as a screenwriter and producer. 
Basichis is Co-Founder of Corra Group, specializing in background checks and corporate research and investigation for companies around the world. He is a native of Philadelphia, but has lived most of his life in Southern California and Northern New Mexico.
Basichis is also co-founder of Corra, which as the Corra Group specializes in pre-employment and corporate research and investigation. In addition to his books, Basichis has written Breach of Trust/Crash, a feature film, and has co-written several television series pilots. He co-created and served as Executive Producer on the forthcoming Showtime mini-series Land of Dreams. He was the co-producer of an ABC Television Network series pilot, and the producer-director of Jerry, One Man's Triumph, a video documentary about the nation's first jailhouse lawyer. He has worked as an investigative journalist and researcher, and in advertising, marketing and public relations.

He currently writes for the blog sites Hopeful Romantics, which is featured on Kindle Blogs, and Corra Daily Planet.

Customer Reviews

This was truly one of a kind.
"fdietrich4"
It is not very well written, both story wise, misspelled words, etc., but the author claims to have had a personal relationship with the subject of the book.
lkharter
This author seemed to want to be involved with Vicki Moran in order to have a sexual relationship......all the while carrying on with his wife.
Happygoddess

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

47 of 48 people found the following review helpful By "fdietrich4" on April 2, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is absolutely one of the wildest biographies I have ever read. If it wasn't true it would make great fiction, right up there with the sexy potboilers and confessionals I so love to read. This is the story of Vicki Morgan, longtime mistress to Alfred Bloomingdale, and the loved they shared, a strange and crazy kind of love that would lead to their mutual destruction. Here he was, scion of Bloomingdales Department Store, industrial magnate and member of Ronald Reagan's kitchen cabinet; and here she was a naive but gorgeous small town girl come to the big city.
This book has an epic sweep as Vicki Morgan, in a vain attempt to escape the married Bloomingdale, encounters a series of adventures with some of the world's most wealthy and powerful men. And women. It is not a tale for the faint hearted, but there are strong moral lessons--mainly there is a steep price for the glamour and the money men give for sexual favors.
The story is told from the author's point of view. He spent nine months with Vicki Morgan and was one of the last people to see her alive. The author, Gordon Basichis, gives us intimate insight into the making of a wordly rich girl who knows how to manipulate men for money, only to be trapped in the game she has profited by for so many years. Through the seventies and into the eighties she was getting at least a quarter millon dollars from these different lovers.
It's rare that I find a book so compelling. I love how the story describes the high life of power and money while showing, also, how this glitzy path leads to destruction and, in this case, murder. This was truly one of a kind.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
39 of 40 people found the following review helpful By tak127 on August 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
Alred Bloomingdale was a rich, powerful man. He was part of Ronald Reagan's "kitchen cabinet." Vicki Morgan was a poor, confused teenager and unwed mother. At 17, impressed with Bloomingdale's money and power, Vicki became Alfred's mistress. Their relationship lasted 13 years and was more than sex. It was Alfred's wish that Vicki be "taken care of" and he signed papers guaranteeing her a sum of money for a specified period of time. After his death, his wife Betsy, cut off the payments. This set in motion events which would lead to Vicki's brutal murder.
This book tells of their relationship from Vicki's point of view. It details the sado-masochistic parties, orgies and prostitutes that Alfred's money bought.
I enjoyed this book. I always believed that money enabled people to get away with many things that us normal, middle class people would be prosecuted for; this book confirms that. Whether you believe that Vicki was a tramp who took advantage of Alfred, or a confused girl who was taken advantage of by a rich, old man with bizarre sexual proclivities, Vicki certainly did not deserve to be beaten to death with a baseball bat.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By steve on December 4, 2001
Format: Hardcover
this book was very moving. the story of a mistress, who never can seem to find her way, but found love in a married man. the author got to knew vicki before her murder and this gives us great insight into her thoughts and feelings. i highly recommend this book, a great read from beginning to end.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
Power, Sex and Money
I was totally caught up in this true tale of a naive and beautiful young woman, trapped in a world where power, sex and money reign. As the mistress to Alfred Bloomingdale, the department store heir and member of the kitchen cabinet, Vicki Morgan lived a life that few can imagine...a wild and ultimately tragic journey that ended in her brutal murder. What I loved about this book was its unwillingness to rely on predictable cliche. The author's insight sheds new light on a very old subject -- sex and power. The writing is personal, intimate, at times humorous and always engaging. If this book were published today, it would be a bestseller
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Alliekat9090 on July 23, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I don't think I have ever read such a load of malarky in my life. The "author" seems to have written this book for the express purpose of bragging that he slept with the subject and using what he thinks are his "writing skills" to cram as many silly and mis-used adjectives into every sentence he writes. It reads like a 10th grader trying desperately to impress an English teacher. The book is full of quoted conversations that this courtesan had with any number of people- conversations he couldnt possibly know anything about, let alone quote verbatim. The book really doesnt tell this woman's story at all. It's just endless pages of rambling psycho-babble bedtime conversations he supposedly had with this woman. If I had to read how she reached for a cigarette with her slender manicured fingers while stretching out her long legs on the sofa and deeply sighing.....my God.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Acute Observer on August 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
Young Vicki Morgan wanted to escape from her working-class surroundings in the Valley. She was exceptionally pretty, shrewd, and had native intelligence. Her charms attracted rich and powerful men who catered to her desires. Yet she became another victim trapped by greed and exploitation. Beauty does not trump class distinctions (p.7). Vicki lived fast and died young. The author compares her to Dorothy Stratten, Colleen Applegate, and Edie Sedgewick. Vicki got close enough to corporate rulers and political leaders. Did she know too much and become a threat to the established order (p.8)? Did Vicki's absent father affect her interest in older men? This book lacks a table of contents and an index.

After Vicki sued Alfred Bloomingdale, the tawdry sex life of this intimate adviser to Ronald Reagan was exposed. The author was introduced to Vicki by a movie producer, and began talks to produce a book. Vicki met Alfred Bloomingdale at 17 and became his kept mistress; she then learned the manners and morals of the upper class. Alfred Bloomingdale was a member of Ronald Reagan's kitchen cabinet. He was a co-founder of Diner's Club; personal information about the lives of the rich and famous were useful to intelligence services (p.41). Alfred Bloomingdale could have been a perfect case study for psychiatrists (pp.66-67). Alfred had the money and power to indulge his whims (p.60). Vicki stayed with him because she needed money to raise her son (p.63). But her spending habits suggest she considered it something to get rid of as fast as she got it (pp.81-82).

Vicki tried living with other men, but always came back to Alfred Bloomingdale. After he died, Vicki was left with nothing but shame and despair (p.87). When Betsy saw Alfred and Vicki together, she ended the affair (pp.110-103).
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?