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Beautiful on the Mountain: An Inspiring True Story Kindle Edition

176 customer reviews

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Length: 305 pages

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Product Details

  • File Size: 3334 KB
  • Print Length: 305 pages
  • Publisher: Tyndale Momentum (May 16, 2014)
  • Publication Date: May 16, 2014
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00GWT8DZW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #202,434 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J4Life5 on June 17, 2014
Format: Paperback
It took me a long time to get through this book. I read it for a week and it is only about 250 pages long. I just couldn't get into it and I never experienced that feeling of "I can't go to sleep until I find out what happens". Jeannie presents an intriguing, sympathetic character, as a woman reeling from a divorce and forced to make a new life for herself. The setting is obviously beautiful, on the mountains in Virginia.

In my opinion, what held this book back from being great was the lack of depth in relationships. I don't mean to say that the author didn't have deep, meaningful relationships with her neighbors. It just didn't seem to translate into the book. I would have liked to have read a lot more interactions and stories about the mountain folk, and less about the authors trips back to the city for her classes and such.

Perhaps my expectations were too high, because I adored the Mitford series. However, I can imagine that this book would appeal to some readers, but it wasn't great for me.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for my honest review. All opinions are my own.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By sesquius on May 21, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I selected this book from the Tyndale Blog Network, based upon the synopsis. "If you enjoyed the classic novel Christy and the bestselling Mitford series, then you’ll love Beautiful on the Mountain, a real-life tale about serving God in unlikely circumstances. In 1977, Jeannie Light left her fine plantation home amid heartbreak and came to Graves Mill, a tiny hamlet in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Alone in an utterly new kind of life, Jeannie was determined to find the courage to make a fresh start."
Christy and Julie by Catherine Marshall are two of my most favorite books ones that I have read so many times they are dog-eared, so this book had some high expectations to meet. The book didn't meet my expectations. I read the first chapter, then the second, and then the third. By the time I hit the fourth chapter I was skimming and looking for some sort of insight to bring me back in. To make me want to read the book. By the middle of the book, I flipped to the end.

Maybe the problem for me was that it was told in first person. I never got to know the person, feel what she was feeling or even like her. I found her more annoying than anything, and that was only because I never really understood her. Therefore I am probably not the best person to give an accurate synopsis of the book. This may be the most awesome inspiring true story for some, but it was lost on me.

I received this complimentary copy from the Tyndale Blog Network to give an honest opinion of the book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Debra Brinkman VINE VOICE on July 6, 2014
Format: Paperback
I love a good biography (or autobiography), I loved the novel Christy, and I've always been fascinated by the Blue Ridge Mountains. So this book seemed perfect for me.

Once I got the book, however, I started second-guessing myself. The first few chapters tell a bit about how Jeannie came to be living in Graves Mill, and while definitely a necessary part of her story, it did take awhile before I could start to really care.

What struck me about this story, which mostly takes place from about 1977-1979, was the struggle to have a community in this rural area. The Graves Mill Church was once the center of things, a place where people could come together and love God and each other. But it has been closed for quite some time, and Jeannie is called on to get it back going.

The story that unfolds is filled with amazing 'coincidences' and fascinating twists along the way. Like so many rural churches, the odds are against them. Organized religion tends to be as well, as the late 70s were roughly the start of the move towards mega-churches. Jeannie runs up against the "let 'em drive into town" attitude that I've seen in my life too.

The world needs rural churches though. Really.

In the middle of the book, speaking of this push towards city churches, Jeannie writes:

That described Graves Chapel's history, of course. It was closed because it could no longer pay its way, and without pastoral care, the people scattered. But there was a problem with the theory. Some of the local people didn't fit in the town churches and wanted a community. They remembered the days when people stayed on their home places, when families joined together to plant and harvest, when cider making was a festival time.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By connywithay on June 21, 2014
Format: Paperback
Title: Beautiful on the Mountain: An Inspiring True Story
Author: Jeannie Light
Publisher: Tyndale Momentum
ISBN: 978-1-1414-8713-0

“Because of the blackberry adventure, I was appropriately equipped for my new world. More important, I was beginning to understand that I must rely on God’s providence and guidance to sustain me up there on that beautiful mountain,” Jeannie Light writes in her autobiography, "Beautiful on the Mountain: An Inspiring True Story."

At three hundred and eight pages, this paperback targets those who like an inspirational biography of one’s spiritual journey learning to depend on God. Using mainly the New International Version of the Bible, the KJV, NASB, NKVM, ASV, and NLT are referenced. The foreword is by David Aikman.

Told in first person, the author readily accepts her misguidance and insecurity in her younger days as an adult. After two months abroad where she connects with the Almighty, she returns to a crumbled marriage. In a divorce settlement, she becomes owner to seven hundred acres of land in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia.

Tucked away in a beautiful valley, Light leaves city life and moves to the rural countryside to become a shepherdess. Her plans abruptly change when one of the seasoned locals convinces her to reopen the small Graves Mill church that was built in 1885.

With God’s continual protection, she moves her beloved dog, two horses, two cats, and twenty chickens to the small cottage nearby the church and considers her new direction to become a missionary to the mountain people.
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