Beauty & Ruin

June 3, 2014 | Format: MP3

$5.00
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4:08
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2:39
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2:55
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2:14
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3:23
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3:40
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2:54
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2:03
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3:14
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2:18
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3:16
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3:25

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: June 3, 2014
  • Label: Merge Records
  • Copyright: 2014 Merge Records
  • Total Length: 36:09
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00KLUQDJ6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #211 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 32 customer reviews
I've followed Bob Mould since Husker Du and own most of the albums he's done.
G. Brozeit
Mould's fluid and concise songwriting, complimented with the clean production, propels "Beauty and Ruin" into a barnstorming listening experience.
E N in Ohio
You have everything, good songs, good playing, and music/songs, that will be stuck in your head for days, and that's not a bad thing.
Cecil A. Allen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Stargrazer on June 4, 2014
Format: Audio CD
This is another really strong recording from Bob Mould, and while it doesn't quite reach the bracing perfection of 2012's Silver Age, it comes darn close and definitely delivers the goods his current trio with Superchunk's drummer Jon Wurster and Verbow bassist Jason Narducy are adept at.

Things get off to a relatively measured start with the powerful yet mid-tempo "Low Season." This time around the sheer volume, punch, and musical aggression of Silver Age are exchanged for a more varied collection of tempos and textures. Bits of acoustic guitar and a capella hummed intros keep Beauty & Ruin from being another (albeit superb) guitar monolith. Once again care and attention are given to the interstices and cracks between songs. Layered guitar distortion and echos make tiny soundscapes that string the individual songs together like beads on a continuous chain.

When third track "I Don't Know You Anymore" fires up, it has an immediate familiarity; it's a very "Bob Mould" song from its lyrical DNA to its melodic skin. But if the worst you can say is that Mould writes songs that sound like his own songs, that's not much of a negative to level.

I find that as we really get into the mid-section of this album the pace picks up and carries through to the last note. The rhythm section really drives things along, bringing some of the best moments of Sugar and "Black Sheets Of Rain" to mind and even upping the tension-and-release. Mould's past experiments with merging electronic sounds and beats into his music often seemed a little timid, and there is no timidity on Beauty & Ruin. Beauty & Ruin sticks to the power trio format to great success.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By E N in Ohio on June 15, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Bob's follow-up to his 2012 release "Silver Age" continues his return to the "meat and potatoes" songwriting that remains his strength as a recording artist. For as much as I love "Silver Age," "Beauty and Ruin" is a notch above in consistency.

Mould's fluid and concise songwriting, complimented with the clean production, propels "Beauty and Ruin" into a barnstorming listening experience. "Low Season" kicks-off the record with Mould's distinctive growl overtop an ominous melody. Things really accelerate with the album's second track "Little Glass Pill," and continue right on through until the last notes of closing track "Fix It."

Highlights here are the brief, punchy, but acerbic, "Hey Mr. Grey" and first single "I Don't Know You Anymore," which sounds like a long-lost Husker Du outtake. Not a bad song in this self-produced 12-track collection.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By G. Brozeit on June 7, 2014
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've followed Bob Mould since Husker Du and own most of the albums he's done. This one ranks right up there with the best of any of his work.

Beauty & Ruin seems to contain the entire spectrum of Bob Mould's styles--high energy rock through contemplative ballads. It has something for everyone who is even mildly familiar with his work. It will satisfy long-time fans and serves as a wonderful introduction to those new to him. The ballads Forgiveness and Let the Beauty Be highlight his contemplative songwriting. I Don't Know You Anymore and Fix It are as good as any of his signature songs.

He's an American icon and this collection proves it over and over again.
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21 of 31 people found the following review helpful By JTL on June 3, 2014
Format: Audio CD
I remember when Sugar's Copper Blue came out. It was summer. Right before the record came out Bob and the rest of the band came to Morgantown, WV to play one of the few shows they were playing in the US before going overseas. That show was one of the single most amazing moments of my life. Bob Mould in a club that held a couple hundred people, two Fender Twins driving two Marshall four 12" cabinets (WOW!), band raging at well over 120 decibels. And then the band came to Good Intentions Studios (my apartment) and hung out. I was already planning to move to NYC the next summer and Bob, who lived in NYC at the time, looked at the Subway map with me and showed me places I should look for an apartment.

One of the nicest rock n roll guys I've ever met. I talked to him after shows several times in that era and he always remembered my name. If you can find a recording of a Mountain Stage performance he did back then, it's highly worth checking out. I was there with the band I was playing with at the time. We played in town to no one the night before and score free tickets to the show from the folks we stayed with that night.

But I digress. That summer of 1992 "If I Can't Change Your Mind" was the song for the season in the cassette deck of my white '85 Dodge Omni. I drove around town, to my dishwasher/lunch waiter job at the Chinese restaurant, to the Dairy Mart for beer and pepperoni rolls, lather, rinse repeat. This song, and the rest of this new record by Mr. Mould is has the same effect. It's almost a companion to Copper Blue in some ways. This is probably as close to old school Bob we've ever gotten, but it feels fresh and pertinent.

Thanks for continuing to make my life great with your tunes, Bob. No more beer or pepperoni rolls for me, but some things have remained constant, like the anticipation and satisfaction I get when it's summertime and you've got a new record out.
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