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On Becoming Baby Wise: The Classic Sleep Reference Guide Used by Over 1,000,000 Parents Worldwide Paperback – November 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 238 pages
  • Publisher: Parent-Wise Solutions; Rev&Expand edition (November 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0971453209
  • ISBN-13: 978-0971453203
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3,306 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,795 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Theologian Gary Ezzo and pediatrician Dr. Robert Bucknam set off cries of alarm in their highly controversial 1995 publication On Becoming Baby Wise by arguing that some crying is natural and healthy for babies. In this updated edition, Ezzo and Bucknam present a comprehensive method to encourage a full night's sleep for the seven- to nine-week-old baby. It's easy to read, easy to follow, supported by research and by testimonials from parents and pediatricians, and includes suggestions for making the process fit into the reader's lifestyle. The authors believe a consistent sleep routine leads to happier, more responsible, and better-adjusted children. But a full night's sleep is just the short-term goal. The long-term goal is training parents to bring order and stability to their families through nurturing the marriage, providing a loving structure for one's children, and allowing flexibility in the process.

Twelve chapters cover feeding philosophies, monitoring baby's growth, establishing baby's routine, handling multiple births, and the ever-controversial chapter on when baby cries. The 52-week method involves four phases, beginning with "Stabilization" from birth to week 8. During weeks 9 through 15 ("Extended Night"), babies learn to sleep through the night. Ezzo and Bucknam attempt to teach the difference between a baby's many cries and advise parents on various responses to these cries. Critics dislike Ezzo's strong belief that "child-centered parenting" (feeding baby whenever it cries, sleeping with and "wearing" baby) fosters demanding, insecure toddlers. But for parents who are tired of being tired--or whose previous experience with child-centered parenting supports Ezzo's theory--it may be worth a read. --Liane Thomas --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“From a pediatrician’s perspective, this is a sigh of welcome relief for sleepless, weary parents.”
—David Blank, M.D., Longmont, CO

“Since being introduced to the principles of Babywise, I have been convinced of its effectiveness in establishing sleep patterns and in decreasing the frequency of problems associated with infant feeding.”
—Craig Lloyd, M.D., Brisbane, Australia

“Babywise provides sound parenting advice and common-sense pediatric care to many parents who are confused, frustrated and downright sleep deprived.”
—David Miller, M.D., Superior, CO --This text refers to the Audio CD edition.

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
1,678
4 star
407
3 star
135
2 star
96
1 star
991
See all 3,307 customer reviews
You know what the author of the book would say to that...I wasn't doing it right!
C. M. Seekins
Our routine was sleep. eat. play. sleep. then eat. then play, then baby is tired and ready to sleep. then baby wakes and is ready to eat. and so on.
Megan
We are all parents and the book was developed to help parents recognize a childs needs and to help nurture them to be happier babies.
Erin M. Gajdalo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

943 of 1,015 people found the following review helpful By Will Riddle on November 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
I am not interested in Ezzo- or GFI-bashing here in this review.

As a mom of three infant boys, each a little over a year apart with one more on the way, I see nothing wrong with the gist of the Babywise book. The principles for eating and sleeping work rather well if you employ them with some grace and flexibility as tiny ones require. Contrary to what you may have heard, the Ezzo's do not suggest tossing your tenderness, intuition, or creative parenting out the window--they provide some basic eating/sleeping instructions very similar to those sent home with Mom a generation ago from Dr. Spock, the pediatrician, or the hospital nurse (but not highly common nowadays due to the AAP's shift in philosophy). Such advice will not harm your baby unless you employ their methods religiously as if it is the "magic formula" to enjoying newborns. There exists no such formula--not in Ezzo, and not in the Sears or child-centered camp either.

Briefly, the basic principles covered include:
1. Feeding approx every three hours
2. Trying to keep your baby awake during feedings and a little afterwards.
3. Putting your baby down to sleep before the next feeding
4. Keeping your baby on a eat-wake-sleep routine to help their hunger stabilize for faster nighttime sleeping.
5. Trying not to allow babies to become overdependent for sleep on any one prop (rocking, swings, slings, pacifiers, car rides, etc).
6. Generally helping the baby's needs to fit into you and your family's routine, rather than arranging you and your family's needs completely around the baby's routine (or having none at all).

I maintain that these principles, while presented a little briskly, are not damaging to infants.
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192 of 214 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 25, 2001
Format: Paperback
There is some valid criticism of this book, which is the reason that I only reluctantly give copies to brand new parents--both singing the praises of the methods and warning not to apply everything Ezzo recommends blindly.
The basic premise is that you feed your baby when it first wakes, and wake the baby if it falls asleep before getting a good, complete feeding. Then you try to keep the baby awake--at first this will be only a few minutes, maybe just 2 or 3 minutes in a newborn. Then, while the baby is still awake, lie him or her down to sleep. The main idea is that you don't let the baby depend the breast or nipple to go to sleep--the baby learns to comfort and put herself to sleep. The theory is that babies wake naturally every few hours. With this method they have the skills to get themselves back to sleep without fully waking or waking you once, twice, three times each night.
It REALLY works for most babies. I'm sure there are some babies who just don't have the temperment for this, but it worked like a charm for my baby, and for all of my friends whom I've turned on to the book. I have a five month old who sleeps 12 hours at a stretch without waking and has done so since she was 10 weeks old. Not ONCE since she was 10 weeks old has she awoken in the middle of the night, and she wakes up in the morning so happy and calm it's hard to believe. Often, she'll wake about 1/2 an hour before her usual waking time and "sing" and coo to herself in the crib. When she sees me come into the room, she is grinning from ear to ear. And despite the fact that she has just gone over 12 hours since the last feeding, she is not ravenously hungry in the morning--rarely finishes her very first bottle.
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59 of 65 people found the following review helpful By "flickjunkie" on May 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book is an excellent tool. The advice offered is not thebe all and end all in infant feeding, but it is basically sound.
Asnew parents, we were introduced to this book by our Pediatrician who was a devotee. We had heard it had a Christian agenda, but we bought it in spite of that to make our own decision about the advice as to its practicality. After reading it, it seemed sensible so we went with the plan starting with our son's very first feeding.
We continued with the plan and with ADAPTATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS it worked well. Our son was above birthweight after 2 days. He slept through the night in 7 weeks and maintained above the 50th percentile in weight throughout infancy. He napped readily with little fuss in most cases. He is two now and he is well behaved, sleeps like a log at night and naps without any problems.
That being said I want to go back to ADAPTATIONS AND MODIFICATIONS. Any success plan requires situation specific adjustments. You need to look at this book as a guideline, not a gospel. In almost every horror story I've read about this plan I have found a statement like, "I followed the plan to the letter." Therein lies the problem. Anyone who sits there and listens to her baby cry for an hour because she is following some plan out of a book needs a mental exam.
My spouse and I have noticed among our friends that on-demand feeding tends to produce on-demand parents and unruly children. I believe that babies (as well as children and adults) need structure, but it needs to be FLEXIBLE STRUCTURE. It needs to be situation specific, child specific and even mood specific. You need to set your boundaries with bungee cord, not with barbed wire.
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