Becoming a Category of One and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $4.67 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Monday, April 28? Order within and choose Two-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: GOOD CONDITION - inscription on first page, edges display light/average wear, binding edge is free of creases. No Worries Return Policy
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Becoming a Category of One: How Extraordinary Companies Transcend Commodity and Defy Comparison Paperback


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.28
$9.78 $0.44 $10.55

Frequently Bought Together

Becoming a Category of One: How Extraordinary Companies Transcend Commodity and Defy Comparison + Be the Best at What Matters Most: The Only Strategy You will Ever Need
Price for both: $31.65

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

100 M&T
100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime
Looking for something good to read? Browse our picks for 100 Mysteries & Thrillers to Read in a Lifetime, brought to you by the Amazon Book Editors.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 2 edition (August 24, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0470496355
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470496350
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #304,493 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this no-nonsense guide to beating the competition, Calloway, a branding and competitive positioning consultant with clients like BMW and IBM, offers hope to companies confronting a constantly changing and increasingly competitive marketplace. Success, he says, lies in distinguishing yourself from others and forging emotional connections with customers. Before you do anything else, Calloway says, you must answer the question, "Who are you?" unambiguously and with fervor. If your response is vague and uninspiring, Calloway predicts failure, since a lame answer signals lack of vision, focus and commitment, elements he considers essential just to be in the running. An advocate of corporate language that reinforces company identity and motivates employees, Calloway shuns empty slogans and fashionable buzzwords. He snappily makes his point by asking what would have happened if Martin Luther King Jr. had proclaimed, "I Have a Strategic Plan" instead of "I Have a Dream." In no uncertain terms, he asserts companies must pay close attention to each customer and focus marketing on individuals, not abstract demographics. Anyone spacing out while Calloway exhorts innovation and hard work to connect with the customer base in ways that Starbucks, Southwest Airlines and others have will hop to when he has a hypothetical customer ask, "Why should I do business with you?" A company without a compelling answer, Calloway believes, will see the customer go elsewhere. But Calloway emphasizes triumph is possible with disciplined application and provides case studies, interviews and anecdotes illustrating successful approaches for earning customer loyalty and for setting businesses apart in their fields.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

very strongly recommends this book to business leaders and students of management& -- getAbstract.com, April 2004

“… very strongly recommends this book to business leaders and students of management…” (getAbstract.com, April 2004)

Price, product, and even quality don't cut it anymore when it comes to raising above the competition. So says brand consultant Calloway, who offers an energetic piece on branding, company culture, and customers. He looks at the likes of Harley-Davidson, Starbucks, and lesser knowns such as the Nashville-based Tractor Supply Company to show how they have differentiated themselves by creating their own categories. Calloway advises companies to begin by figuring out who they are and what their corporate culture is like. He continues with a discussion of branding, explaining how customer perception of the company actually creates the brand. He then urges companies to break away from the pack by connecting with customers better than the competition does. Calloway includes ample real-world examples from his clients, and the customer-service experiences he cites from his personal and professional lives ring especially true. With companies scrambling to survive in this dicey economy, the book is apropos for all business collections. —Carol J. Elsen, Univ. of Wisconsin Lib., Whitewater (Library Journal, August 2003)

In this no-nonsense guide to beating the competition, Calloway, a branding and competitive positioning consultant with clients like BMW and IBM, offers hope to companies confronting a constantly changing and increasingly competitive marketplace. Success, he says, lies in distinguishing yourself from others and forging emotional connections with customers. Before you do anything else, Calloway says, you must answer the question, "Who are You?" unambiguously and with fervor. It your response is vague and uninspiring, Calloway predicts failure, since a lame answer signals lack of vision, focus and commitment, elements he considers essential just to be in the running. An advocate of corporate language that reinforces company identity and motivates employees, Calloway shuns empty slogans and fashionable buzzwords. He snappily makes his point by asking what would have happened if Martin Luther King Jr. had proclaimed, "I Have a Strategic Plan" instead of "I Have a Dream." In no uncertain terms, he asserts companies must pay close attention to each customer and focus marketing on individuals, not abstract demographics. Anyone spacing out while Calloway exhorts innovation and hard work to connect with the customer base in ways that Starbucks, Southwest Airlines and others have will hop to when he has a hypothetical customer ask, "Why should I do business with you?" A company without a compelling answer, Calloway believes, will see the customer go elsewhere. But Calloway emphasizes triumph is possible with disciplined application and provides case studies, interviews and anecdotes illustrating successful approaches for earning customer loyalty and for setting businesses apart in their fields. (Aug.) (Publishers Weekly, June 23, 2003)

[this books is a] "no-nonsense guide to beating the competition." -- Publishers Weekly, June 23, 2003 --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

Joe Calloway helps great companies get even better. He helps organizations and top-performing individuals focus on what is truly important, inspires constant improvement, and motivates people to immediate action. A business author, advisor, and speaker, Joe's corporate client list reads like a Who's Who in business, ranging from companies like Coca Cola and IBM to Cadillac and American Express.

Joe is the author of five ground-breaking business books including Becoming A Category of One, which received rave reviews from the New York Times, Publisher's Weekly, Retailing Today and many others. Joe's newest book is Be The Best At What Matters Most, is published by John Wiley And Sons.

Joe is a popular speaker for business meetings and events, and he also works with clients to help them achieve specific results and improvements in exclusive 90 day advisory programs. Although Joe has been inducted into the Speakers Hall of Fame, he doesn't do traditional "speeches." Instead, Joe actively engages people in highly interactive keynote presentations and workshops that challenge assumptions and create new ways of thinking.

Customer Reviews

Great book....gets you really pumped up.
tnpilot99
More than just a book of theory, this volume also offers practical case studies, information and interviews.
Rolf Dobelli
Every business owner/leader should be required to read this book.
Drew McLellan

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Susanne Houdek on September 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
If you take only two (of many) things away from this book, it is 1) your brand belongs to your customers and 2)once you've achieved Category One status, the price of your product is (almost)immaterial.
Joe makes a very simple point that ends up being one of those "slap your forehead" moments: Do all the corporate-like things, such as have a mission and vision, build an ace culture, walk the talk, etc. but ultimately it is your customer who decides whether you deliver on your brand promise. And that customer is a doozy: intelligent, educated, demanding and able to look through a smoke and mirror tactic in a second.
Speaking of Mirrors...Joe unashamedly plugs his restaurant "Mirror" in Nashville - not because he needs the advertising (although being a bit of a gourmet and a lot of a gourmand, I was about to relocate at the mention of "blue cheese polenta fries") but because the restaurant is a Category of One enterprise. Everybody in that place and all the other case studies Joe talks about have one thing in common: a laser focus on the customer and what she wants - and then delivering it, every time, flawlessly and with a big smile. That customer will come back time and again. Not because you have the best prices - in fact - your products may be significantly more expensive, but because she likes doing business with your people.
Reading Joe's book is like having a conversation with him. I found myself nodding and agreeing out loud (in the privacy of my home, of course). Overall, it re-emphasized the importance of strong leadership, a value system that is constantly talked about, and all employees knowing why they get up in the morning.
Needless to say, but I will anyway: Read it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By S. Horn on September 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Joe Calloway practices what he preaches. The author is not content to rehash what others have written about the topic of branding. He offers innovative suggestions that can give you and your business top-of-the-mind awareness in your industry. Packed with fascinating, real-life examples and results-producing suggestions, this book should be required reading for entrepreneurs and CEO's because their success depends on their ability to distinguish themselves from competitors. Read it and reap.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Roger E. Herman on September 7, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In today's intensely competitive world, being unique has value. Being positively unique has even more value. Leading your category in the marketplace builds business through the image of that coveted Number One status. Being so unique and so powerful that you're in a category all by yourself is the ultimate achievement. That positioning sets you apart from all would-be competitors because you're something pretty special...and people like to do business with suppliers that are something pretty special. If you want to achieve superlative success, your goal should be to become a Category of One.
First step: Read Joe Calloway's book. Second step: Read it again. Why? You'll be so entranced on the first reading that you'll miss a significant amount of valuable advice. Step Three: Start applying what you've learned from this book. Step Four: Read the book again, going back to all those passages you highlighted. Oh, along the way, better buy copies for all your key people so they can also get the message. [Snicker. After reading this book, you may have difficulty limiting who fits in that vital category of "key people."
Calloway is a management consultant who specializes in branding and competitive positioning. Through his client interactions over the years, and his own personal experiences, he's accumulated a wealth of information and insight. He knows how to be so good that your would-be competitors can't even touch you. In a surprising self-effacing gesture, rarely seen from consultants, Calloway shares in the preface that he's not the expert; he's merely a reporter. I have difficulty believing that he doesn't have expertise, but he sure does a fine job of reporting what winning companies are doing.
Each chapter is filled with advice, anecdotes, and inspiration.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By John Patinella on August 29, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book is terrific, a must read for any organization looking for a solid, no nonsense way to diffentiate themselves from the competition without focusing on product or price. Sure, there are alot of customer service books out there, but this one hits it on the head! It's PEOPLE and the experience they create for the customer that are your brand.
The book in clear fashion outlines the easy to grasp ways a company can truly diffentiate themselves from the competition without placing the major focus on product or price.
The author writes in plain, fun, and easy to understand english with many real life examples to illustrate the message. While the book is a quick read, it is packed with very good material. One of the most important business books I have ever read. The book itself is in a Category of One! (Sorry, pun intended).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Rolf Dobelli HALL OF FAME on March 9, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Any CEO would love to run a company that is regarded as truly in a class by itself. After all that's about as close to a monopoly as you can get without running afoul of the regulators. Some companies - such as Starbucks, Volkswagen, Southwest Airlines and Apple Computers - do come close to being in a class by themselves. Here, consultant and author Joe Calloway suggests that all "Category of One" companies share a common trait that explains how they achieved success. More than just a book of theory, this volume also offers practical case studies, information and interviews. Strong on concepts, it needs to provide a bit more guidance about how to push your company into its own category. That said, we very strongly recommends this book to business leaders and students of management who find marketplace excellence a never-ending pursuit.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa5431900)