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Becoming a Critical Thinker: A Guide for the New Millennium (2nd Edition) Paperback – July 23, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0536859341 ISBN-10: 0536859345 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 244 pages
  • Publisher: Pearson Learning Solutions; 2 edition (July 23, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0536859345
  • ISBN-13: 978-0536859341
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.7 x 10.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,785,165 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Robert Todd Carroll (b. 1945) has always been interested in weird things, mysteries, stories of miracles and psychics and how beliefs in strange things conflict with logic and science. His favorite pasttime is thinking about why people believe in psychics, alien abductions, astrology, and hundreds of other things that conflict with what the science tells us. He taught Critical Thinking for more than thirty years and still enjoys investigating the biases, fallacies, and illusions that make being rational difficult. Since 1994, he's been posting articles on weird things and critical thinking at www.skepdic.com. The website is called The Skeptic's Dictionary and has more than 700 entries, plus essays, book reviews, and more.

He taught philosophy for many years at a northern California community college. His first book (1975) was about the philosophy of an Anglican bishop who challenged the new empiricism as expressed by John Locke. Later, he wrote the text book "Becoming a Critical Thinker" (2003, 2nd ed. 2005) and a book named after his website: "The Skeptic's Dictionary" (Wiley, 2003).

In 2011, the James Randi Educational Foundation published his e-book "Unnatural Acts: Critical Thinking, Science, and Skepticism Exposed!" In 2012, the paperback of "Unnatural Acts" came out. "Mysteries and Science" came about at the urging of his wife and grandchildren for a critical thinking/science book about weird things aimed at a younger audience. In 2013, he published "The Critical Thinker's Dictionary: Biases, Fallacies, and Illusions and what you can do about them."

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 50 people found the following review helpful By F. Carroll on March 9, 2007
Format: Paperback
First, let me say that the "Legally English is Axiomatic" reviewer is incoherent. He also, sort of, wrote in English; and his comments are meaningless. The three people who considered his review valuable must be slightly insane.

This is a valuable book. However, it does contain some flaws. It uses recent political examples where frequently the settled facts are not clear. It seems ironic that a book teaching critical thinking should require its readers to already be critical thinkers when it comes to sortin out the authors political opinion. Furthermore, as a classroom text, these examples could spark debate that could distract the class from understanding the concept being taught. The book also has not been properly proof-read. There are occassional minor lapses in grammar and spelling: This can become mildly annoying. The books preface praising "Socrates" as he is found in Plato is also distressing. I am not certain that Socrates is the model critical thinker given that many of the claims of Platonism are explicitly anti-empirical. Last, the book should treat the relationship between epistemology and metaphysics to logic more deeply. For this see David Kelly's and H.W.B Joeseph's books.

The book does have many virtues though. Topics of rhetoric like evaluating sources and being aware of weasal words are covered in this book: These topics are rarely taught and certainly should be taught along with the other parts of logic. This is a major virtue. The excercises are well constructed and force the reader to apply his new found understanding to the world; his knowledge is not allowed to remain unconnected to his everyday thinking.

This is a very good book with some minor flaws.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert M. Clark on December 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like this book, because we need to learn again and again what type of thought process goes into
decision making, developing a belief system and knowing why you think the way you think. Unfortunately
in our world many believe things that have no evidence and is a repeat of what was told to them. It is of
great importance to look for scientific and medical evidence and reliable research and studies to give
some credibility to what we think is actually a part of our world. Otherwise we may believe myths, rumors,
superstitions, follow charismatic cult figures and listen to nonsense and call it fact.

I like this book and recommend it highly.
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5 of 29 people found the following review helpful By David Jones on August 4, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The print is poor. More seriously the cover is upside down.

No quality checks before dispatch?

This book is going straight back.

I will amend the review when/if a replacement comes.
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22 of 81 people found the following review helpful By Randy White on May 14, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This work is typical of the problems in American higher education--the workbook is overpriced (a comparable workbook in other, non-academic settings would be about $12), and the left-sided bias of the author/professor shows through in every page through political and social commentary. The content is surface-level of the type that can be found with an internet search of "critical thinking" or "principles of logic" or similar.
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