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Becoming a Fighter Pilot in 2011 and Beyond, 1st Edition Paperback – January 18, 2011


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Paperback, January 18, 2011
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 134 pages
  • Publisher: Becoming a Fighter Pilot in 2011 and Beyond, 1st Edition (January 18, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615434487
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615434483
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (35 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,203,472 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Even if you are lucky enough to get winged, you still have to make it through the FRS.
Angus
Obviously the author is a db to write this book but doesn't it take an even bigger one to rate it 5 stars himself!?
Megan
That's what all of us who actually ARE fighter pilots think, but don't take our word for it!!!
ACTUAL Fighter Pilot

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

106 of 109 people found the following review helpful By VenomPen on February 2, 2013
I read this book last week and yesterday I got my first job as a fighter pilot. Can anyone recommend a good book on learning how to speak like a native north Korean? I start on Monday so it has to be a short book.
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149 of 160 people found the following review helpful By ACTUAL Fighter Pilot on January 25, 2013
Before you read a book about how to "Become a Fighter Pilot in 2011 and Beyond," you should probably make sure the author is ACTUALLY a fighter pilot, because in this particular instance, he is not. In fact, by the time this book went to print, this kid had never even stepped foot in a jet, let alone a fighter jet. This book is the equivalent of a virgin writing a book about how to become a pornstar. I was so inspired by his writing, that I think I'm going to write a book about how to become President of the United States. Let's break this book down by chapter.

Chapter 1: Introduction. This chapter takes the reader on a whimsical journey through the mind of the biggest nerd in grade school. If you've ever wondered what it must feel like slobbering over airplane porn, this is your chapter.

Chapter 2: Shannon Anderson. Shannon graduated high school with a 3.92!! WOW!! CONGRATS!! His advice about majoring in Aerospace Engineering couldn't be further from the truth. I know plenty of Surface Warfare officers who majored in Aero and got s***ty grades while their Political Science counterparts were drinking their faces off in flight school. Again, what do I know? Shannon has all the answers.

Chapter 3: Green Weights vs. Red weights. This chapter should be called, "I love Shake Weights." The free Amazon preview kept me from reading any further. I think you get the point.

Shannon, your words of wisdom will no doubt flood the ranks of the Surface Warfare community with overly-qualified aerospace engineers. You have a bright future ahead of you as an author on subjects you have no knowledge of. Might I suggest your next book be entitled, "How to attrite out of flight school in 2013 and beyond - a memoir of stupid s*** students do." That's what all of us who actually ARE fighter pilots think, but don't take our word for it!!!
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101 of 113 people found the following review helpful By Full Afterburner on January 28, 2013
I grew up watching Top Gun and knew from an early age what my calling was. People in high school made fun of me for wearing the traditional jeans and dog tag combo but those nah-sayers knew nothing about what I was going to be. So, like so many before me, I went to school, received my commission, and entered into the fierce dogfight of flight school where I would earn my wings of gold and earn the marks that would land me in the cockpit of our nations greatest jet aircraft ever, the F/A-18E. Some of my classmates washed out, it's a rigorous process, but I stayed focused so I could avoid flying those decrepit old P-3s or dirty helos. Whenever I had an instructor try to give me low grades I would rip open my shirt and show him the golden wings tattooed on my freshly waxed chest. How dare anyone stand in the way of the worlds next triple ace? If that failed I would recite lines from Top Gun, Gladiator, and 300 until he gave me the highest grades possible for the flight. "Are you not entertained!!! IP???" would usually be my finishing line. Yeah, maybe I made up my own emergency procedures and instrument approaches but Kelly McGillis in Top Gun said that Maverick had real talent and genius for not following the standard procedures and I want to be just like him. I never cared much for formation flying, to be honest I never had a wingman that could keep up. I still am searching for my Iceman, look for my ad on craigslist. When my NSS was posted I was the top of my class thanks to this book. I jumped on my motorcycle and headed straight to Lemoore to strap myself into the fastest piece of rocket science I had ever laid eyes on. I trained the way I wanted to fight and the way I knew my sprit totem (Bald Eagle) would want me to fight.Read more ›
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28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By MM on January 30, 2013
As a P-3 Pilot, myself and the rest of the community is desperately praying that you WILL NOT DQ at the boat.
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44 of 50 people found the following review helpful By RAG IP on January 25, 2013
There is only one valuable lesson here. If you seriously aspire to function in the fighter pilot community, do not ever, ever, do something like this. Forget you saw it even.
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62 of 73 people found the following review helpful By JuanBallio30 on January 23, 2013
Potential buyers, I would like to express my gratitude to the author for making ALL Naval Aviators seem like the ultimate douches. This book is garbage, unless you think that someone who has no knowledge about the subject matter can spew liquid crap from his mouth to paper. I can't wait to meet such an expert in the fleet. Dear author, you don't become twice as good when you go from ENS to LTjg(if that ever happens). Take your bolters like a man. There is an 88 jet waiting for you in the fleet.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Flys With Van Keys on January 28, 2013
I want to address the author's losing battle with the English language - I hope he puts more time and effort into his preflight preparation than he put into the creation of this poorly written piece of trash.

There is no coherent tone. The author rapidly swaps between advice and personal experience, sometimes in the same sentence. It is often difficult for a learned man to understand the author's point as he wraps history, experience, baseball orgies, and hypothetical suppositions into a tightly constructed square knot. I often found myself rereading portions of paragraphs in an attempt to figure out if the author was trying to give advice to the reader or to himself.

I felt like the book fell short of the mark when I got to the end and realized that there were no chapters on his winging, his RAG experience, his boat experience, and his fleet experience. At $70 a pop, I don't know if I'll be around to pick up volume two: 500 trips to Pasadita with a Bulls-eye on my back: Lessons Learned at 20 feet over the Seely Dip.
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