Buy New
$10.30
Qty:1
  • List Price: $11.95
  • Save: $1.65 (14%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Beginner's Assyrian (Beginner's (Foreign Language)) Paperback – October 1, 2004


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.30
$7.17 $0.74
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.

  • Get a $150 Amazon.com Gift Card: Get the Citi ThankYou® Preferred Card and earn a $150.00 digital Amazon.com Gift Card* after $1,000 in card purchases within 3 months of account opening. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Beginner's Assyrian (Beginner's (Foreign Language)) + Assyrian Grammar: An Elementary Grammar; with Full Syllabary and Progressive Reading Book; 2d edition
Price for both: $25.37

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Beginner's (Foreign Language)
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Hippocrene Books (October 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0781806771
  • ISBN-13: 978-0781806770
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.8 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,327,929 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

2.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 13, 2005
Format: Paperback
Overall, this is a pretty decent book, esecially for the price, but it is definitely not for a complete novice or for someone who wants to learn to read Assyrian fluently. In both those respects, Huehnergard's "Grammar of Akkadian" is far superior to this (but unfortunately out of print and a little bit pricier). If you're interested in learning Assyrian, this is still a good book to have.

A few things that I liked about the book were as follows: it has a good concise treatment of Assyrian grammar. The bulk of the book is made up of Akkadian texts in transcription. It also includes a sign list and a number of texts in cuneiform and also one translated text for comparison. These make for good reading practice, but . . . that brings me to the things I didn't like.

Though the grammar section was concise, there were no excercises, and it was painfully vague in many places. Because there were no excercises, the student is expected to simply memorize the sign list and grammatical forms and then begin reading unedited Akkadian texts with the help of the notes in the back of the book. Also, the grammatical explanations and vocabulary assume that the reader is already familiar with Biblical Hebrew (the vocabulary list is written in Hebrew letter rather than cuneiform).

In summary, this is a nice book for some extra reading practice (especially for the price), but there really are a number of other grammars available that are much better for a true beginner (try Huehnergard's if you can find it, or Sayce's if you can't).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Urshulgi on December 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
This books is a test of the will, as well as one's desire to become anything like a linguist. If you picked up this book to gain an understanding of assyrian in a sense of fluency, well, there are reasons this book only costs eleven dollars. I have never seen another easily accessible guide to assyrian, and was forced to buy this book for want of a competing volume. It is arranged poorly and one gets the impression it is the product of some editor stealing an assyriologist's notebook. It reads like an archaeologist's private joke, and could turn many people off to the language as a whole. Another word of caution: the triliteral roots used in the back only make sense if one has a solid grounding in ancient hebrew. My own skill at the language is spotty, at best; I eagerly await a better volume for instruction in what I cannot deny is an overlooked and fascinating language.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "bradrubenstein" on August 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
Warning, this book is not very good if you want to actually learn assyrian. It is short and cheap, though, and it gave me an idea about what the morphology of the language. The wonderful thing is that the title is so quirky and eccentric, it is the only book on my coffee table that people actually pick up (no, they don't read it). The only thing better might have been "Teach Yourself Assyrian" or "Assyrian in 30 days".
But no, I still can't decipher the stele at the Met Museum...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
I was searching for a reference that could help me learn the fundamentals of the Assyrian language.
I also found the format to be a little confusing. It appears as one long index. If you want to view the old Assyrian or Aramaic characters and language, this book may be a start. However this is not a grammer, phrase or vocabulary style book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on December 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is not an especially good beginner's book; a more appropriate title would be "A Linguist's Beginner's Assyrian," as it presumes too much previous knowledge of grammar and of Semitic family languages. It would not be appropriate as a first learning text for most people, in my opinion. However, for someone who's main interest, like mine, is in comparative linguistics and not in learning the language per se, but who wants to learn the something about the language, about the grammar, and how it works and is structures, this book is fine.
The book's approach is straight out of late 19th century language pedagogy in it's use of rote memorization and the inclusion of lengthy passages to translate. And the style reads like it was actually written many years ago, and republished by Hippocrene. I'd like to know more about this, but the publication page only lists the date of the Hippocrene edition.
On the pro side, the book includes an alphabet and phonetic guide, a 45-page discussion of the grammar, a glossary of about 800 words, and 30 pages of smaller print footnotes discussing various aspects of the Romanized phoneticizations for translations. There is a list of 215 ideograms and a list of 360 phonograms. So despite its problems, I did learn quite a bit about Assyrian from this book. The language is based on the typical tri-consonantal root system for Semitic family languages, like Arabic, Aramaic, Ugaritic, and Hebrew (but not Hittite, which is now known to be of Indo-European origin).
To highlight some of the mains points of the grammar that I learned, nouns in Assyrian have two genders, male and female. Nothing is needed to form the male gender, and the female ending involves simply adding a "u" to the end of the word.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?