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Beginning Cryptography with Java [Paperback]

by David Hook
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)

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Book Description

August 19, 2005 0764596330 978-0764596339 1
Beginning Cryptography with Java

While cryptography can still be a controversial topic in the programming community, Java has weathered that storm and provides a rich set of APIs that allow you, the developer, to effectively include cryptography in applications-if you know how.

This book teaches you how. Chapters one through five cover the architecture of the JCE and JCA, symmetric and asymmetric key encryption in Java, message authentication codes, and how to create Java implementations with the API provided by the Bouncy Castle ASN.1 packages, all with plenty of examples. Building on that foundation, the second half of the book takes you into higher-level topics, enabling you to create and implement secure Java applications and make use of standard protocols such as CMS, SSL, and S/MIME.

What you will learn from this book

  • How to understand and use JCE, JCA, and the JSSE for encryption and authentication
  • The ways in which padding mechanisms work in ciphers and how to spot and fix typical errors
  • An understanding of how authentication mechanisms are implemented in Java and why they are used
  • Methods for describing cryptographic objects with ASN.1
  • How to create certificate revocation lists and use the Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP)
  • Real-world Web solutions using Bouncy Castle APIs

Who this book is for

This book is for Java developers who want to use cryptography in their applications or to understand how cryptography is being used in Java applications. Knowledge of the Java language is necessary, but you need not be familiar with any of the APIs discussed.

Wrox Beginning guides are crafted to make learning programming languages and technologies easier than you think, providing a structured, tutorial format that will guide you through all the techniques involved.


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Beginning Cryptography with Java + An Introduction to Network Programming with Java: Java 7 Compatible + Agile and Iterative Development: A Manager's Guide
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Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Beginning Cryptography with Java

While cryptography can still be a controversial topic in the programming community, Java has weathered that storm and provides a rich set of APIs that allow you, the developer, to effectively include cryptography in applications—if you know how.

This book teaches you how. Chapters one through five cover the architecture of the JCE and JCA, symmetric and asymmetric key encryption in Java, message authentication codes, and how to create Java implementations with the API provided by the Bouncy Castle ASN.1 packages, all with plenty of examples. Building on that foundation, the second half of the book takes you into higher-level topics, enabling you to create and implement secure Java applications and make use of standard protocols such as CMS, SSL, and S/MIME.

What you will learn from this book

  • How to understand and use JCE, JCA, and the JSSE for encryption and authentication
  • The ways in which padding mechanisms work in ciphers and how to spot and fix typical errors
  • An understanding of how authentication mechanisms are implemented in Java and why they are used
  • Methods for describing cryptographic objects with ASN.1
  • How to create certificate revocation lists and use the Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP)
  • Real-world Web solutions using Bouncy Castle APIs

Who this book is for

This book is for Java developers who want to use cryptography in their applications or to understand how cryptography is being used in Java applications. Knowledge of the Java language is necessary, but you need not be familiar with any of the APIs discussed.

Wrox Beginning guides are crafted to make learning programming languages and technologies easier than you think, providing a structured, tutorial format that will guide you through all the techniques involved.

About the Author

David Hook has been writing software in a variety of domains and languages for the last 20 years. He has worked with Java since 1995, originally doing medical imaging before moving into cryptography and security a year or so later. In April 2000, he co-founded the open source Bouncy Castle cryptography project and has played an active role in it ever since. He currently works as a freelance consultant, mainly in Java, doing the odd bit of lecturing and writing on the side. When he is not using his spare time to work on Bouncy Castle, he spends it pursuing his other interest in computer graphics. He lives in Melbourne, Australia, with his most patient wife Janine and a cat named Hamlet, who really seems to think he’s a little cryptographer in a fur coat. David can be reached at dgh@bund.com.au.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 484 pages
  • Publisher: Wrox; 1 edition (August 19, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0764596330
  • ISBN-13: 978-0764596339
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 7.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #579,067 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to Incorporate Encryption into your Programs November 8, 2005
Format:Paperback
Cryptography is still a delicate issue with a lot of people. There are those, especially in certain law enforcement agencies, who believe that access to stong encryption should not be allowed in the hands of the general public. Indeed, there are export regulations that define encryption technology as munitions. ==At the other end of the scale, there is the simple fact that without secure data transmission, web based electronic commerce would simply be impossible.

This book is on the use of standard Java encryption libraries. This book is written for people who are Java developers and are trying to make use of cryptography in their applications. It presumes that you are familiar with the Java language, but it does not assume you have any familiarity with the encryption APIs. The book covers the recent updates in the security APIs with J2SE 5.0.

This book is very good from the programming point of view, it does not have a lot of history or the background technology of how encryption is done.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very hands-on April 25, 2006
Format:Paperback
Whether it is complete or not (of course, it is not), I would challenge anyone to point at a single alternative book covering Java cryptography at a greater level of details. The style is clear, coverage of ASN.1 is very helpful, and selection of BouncyCastle open source cryptoprovider is the most natural one. Lots more of details and code samples can be found in Bouncy Castle javadocs, but to navigate them without conceptual understanding of Java security in general and BouncyCastle implementation in particular, gained from the book like this one, would be a nightmare.

"Inside Java 2 Platform Security: Architecture, API Design, and Implementation (2nd Edition)" would be another book to recommend, for general overview of Java Security Platform, and, also, to make sense of Java Cryptography Extension (JCE) APIs standardizing access to cryptoproviders' (such as BouncyCastle) libraries. But, of course, the two books have very little overlap.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a really useful one February 18, 2008
Format:Paperback
This book is the best choice if you need to initiate in the use of java crypto API (as its title claims) and it informs extensively about Bouncy Castle crypto API (which I also recommend).

Definitely a good book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Need a lot of updating January 30, 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Creating certificates using the X509V3CerificateGenerator, a key part of Chapter 6, has been deprecated in the Bouncy Castle API. For the moment his example still works in the BC API (1.47)

A much more complicated X509v1CertificateBuilder has replaced it. This pretty much breaks a significant piece of the book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book by an expert on the subject May 27, 2007
Format:Paperback
By anyone's measure, cryptography is a dry and dusty subject but Hook has made it a pleasure to read this book both by trying to keep the tone light and having such a deep and thorough understanding of the topic that the discussion is effortless. While he moves through the subject matter briskly, his mastery of the area means that it's elegantly structured and easy to follow.

All the Wrox books seem to follow a pretty rigid format and I felt sometimes that had the author been given a little more flexibility there, it could have flowed more easily. That said, the consistent organisation of the book makes it easier to use as a reference.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Helpful and Up To Date February 14, 2010
Format:Paperback
If you are just beginning Java this may be a little over your head. However, the concepts and sample applications are all relatively simple. The first chapter provides an excellent overview of why and how the Java crypto architecture works.

I do not regularly keep up with crypto news so some of the tips in this book have been helpful such as not to use SHA1 anymore. It it helpful when the book goes into potential attacks on code as well in order to provide the reader with ideas of the best approach to building secure architectures.

Prior to purchasing this book I had been trying to use several different online examples that did not go into enough depth. I would be willing to recommend this book to anyone trying to do crypto in Java.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hard to follow August 20, 2011
By jgslima
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
This book guided me to understand cryptography with Java, but it was not easy.

Even having in mind that this would not be a "for dummies" book, and also knowing cryptography is a hard subject on its own, I found this book hard to follow in many times. Please note I read technical books regularly.

The author demands a lot from the reader. That's because one thing is to read and simply try to understand what the author is saying. That is not so hard. But another thing is to stop and think how you would actually use and code the processes in real life. I think the book deserves more paragraphs in the end of the chapters, to help the reader concludes important points on each subject. Examples of what you find throughout the book:

- in the RSA sections, the book does not talk clearly about what details must and what details must not be agreed between the 2 parties before the process. Do the parties have to agree upon the symmetric key size? Both the mode and the padding of the 2 cryptography (RSA and symmetric) have to be agreed or each party can choose freely?
- in Diffie-Hellman, in real life applications, do the parties have to previously agree upon the value of P and G?

It is up to the reader to find out this kind of "detail", having to make and test his own code or to make further researches.

Another point is that the sample codes the book has are a little too much simplified. Of course, this is good to introduce a new concept, and also for the sake of the book size. But something that bothered me a lot was the fact the the codes are never split between the code that runs in one of the parties (the sender, for instance) and the other party (the receiver).
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book for Gaining Practical Hands-On Experience!
If you are looking for a book that explains basic cryptographic concepts, this is not the place to start. Read more
Published 10 months ago by Harry E. Smith
3.0 out of 5 stars Not enough Detail
This text has a lot of code snippets. If you like copying code into an IDE, compiling and running with litle understanding of what the code is doing, this book is for you. Read more
Published on October 19, 2011 by pcr
5.0 out of 5 stars Good book on a difficult subject
The book contains a ton of technical names of various encryption algorithms and explanations of how they work, and other horribly boring things like that, somehow it's a fairly... Read more
Published on April 18, 2011 by Dan K
5.0 out of 5 stars Includes code to illustrate concepts
Wrox books are well known for being good. The chapters are easy to read even though the ropic itself may seem daunting. Read more
Published on February 6, 2011 by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is a keeper
I've had a lot of books on my Java bookshelf over the last 15 years. Most I no longer own because the material or ideas are dated. Read more
Published on January 15, 2011 by Mark Petrovic
3.0 out of 5 stars Book needs update to J2SE 5.0
This book does a good introduction but the book needs an update to J2SE 5.x security updates. I like Core Security Patterns by Steel, Nagappan, Lai covers a lot more details on... Read more
Published on September 22, 2006 by Prasad Reddy
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