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Beginning Groovy and Grails: From Novice to Professional Paperback

ISBN-13: 978-1430210450 ISBN-10: 1430210451 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 440 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 1st edition (June 22, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1430210451
  • ISBN-13: 978-1430210450
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #420,122 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jim Shingler is a VP of Application Development for J. P. Morgan Chase. The focus�of his career has been using cutting-edge technology to develop�IT solutions for the banking, insurance, financial services, and manufacturing�industries. He has 16 years of large-scale Java experience and�significant experience in distributed and relational technologies.

Joseph Faisal Nusairat, author of "Beginning JBoss Seam" and co-author "Beginning Groovy & Grails", is a software developer who has been developing web based applications in the Columbus and Phoenix area since 1997, primarily focused on Java / Groovy development. His career has taken him into a variety of Fortune 500 industries including military applications, data centers, banking, internet security, pharmaceuticals, and insurance. Joseph is a graduate of Ohio University with dual degrees in Computer Science and Microbiology with a minor in Chemistry. Currently, Joseph works as the Groovy Sage at Integrallis Software (www.integrallis.com). In his off-hours he enjoys watching bodybuilding and Broadway musicals, but not at the same time.�

Christopher Judd is president and primary consultant for Judd Solutions, LLC. He is�an international speaker,�open source evangelist, leader of the Central Ohio Java Users Group, and coauthor of Enterprise Java Development on a Budget (Apress, 2003). He has spent 12 years architecting and developing software for Fortune 500 companies in various industries, including insurance, retail, government, manufacturing, and transportation. His focus is consulting, mentoring, and training with Java, Java EE, Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME), mobile technologies, and related technologies.

More About the Author

Joseph Faisal Nusairat is a software developer who has been working full-time in the Columbus, Ohio, area since 1998, primarily focused on Java development. His career has taken him into a variety of Fortune 500 industries, including military applications, data centers, banking, Internet security, pharmaceuticals, and insurance. Throughout this experience, he has worked on all varieties of application development'from design to architecture to development. Joseph, like most Java developers, is particularly fond of open source projects and tries to use as much open source software as possible when working with clients.
Joseph is a graduate of Ohio University with dual degrees in Computer Science and Microbiology and a minor in Chemistry. While at Ohio University, Joseph also dabbled in student politics and was a research assistant in the virology labs.

Currently, Joseph works as a senior partner at Integrallis Software (www.integrallis.com). In his off-hours he enjoys watching bodybuilding and Broadway musicals, specifically anything with Lauren Molina in them.

Customer Reviews

In terms of writing, I found this book very readable.
David L. Bailey
13 chapters ranging from Groovy introduction to very advanced GUI builders overview with lots of examples did a good job introducing me to Groovy and Grails.
Jacek Laskowski
Overall I think "Beginning Groovy and Grails: From Novice to Professional" is a good book aimed at Groovy and Grails beginners.
Mihai Bojin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Scott Davis on August 17, 2008
Format: Paperback
Let me start by saying "Beginning Groovy and Grails" is the book that the Grails community has been clamoring for. Two very good books kicked off the Grails revolution ("Definitive Guide to Grails" and "Getting Started with Grails"), but both predate the 1.x version of Grails by many dot-versions and many years (as of the time of this review, August 2008). BGG will certainly have worthy competition on the bookshelf before long, but right now it is the book that we all have been waiting for. Luckily, it easily lives up to the heightened expectations.

After reading BGG cover to cover, it seems to break naturally into three sections: Core Groovy, Core Grails, and Ancillary Grails. This division is mine, not the authors; the table of contents lists 13 chapters with no explicit section breaks. (Whether the three sections correspond to the three authors is an interesting question -- the tone of voice and writing style is consistent across the entire book.)

The first three chapters do an admirable job of covering the Groovy language from the basics to advanced topics. Groovy offers lots of syntactic sugar that might initially catch a Java programmer off-guard. These features, once you've seen them, dramatically reduce the lines of code you have to write. But more than that, there are some fundamentally new features in Groovy that don't have an easy match in Java. Builders, Expandos, metaprogramming, and DSLs are all discussed in these early chapters. While you don't have to use these features yourself to be successful in Grails, it certainly helps the reader understand how much of the Grails "magic" occurs under the covers.

The next three chapters (Introduction to Grails, Building the User Interface, and Building Domains and Services) hit the Core Grails features hard.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Donald 'Donnie' Demuth on June 28, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I come from a strong Django background and when I recently inherited the role of Lead Developer I had the power to make decisions for a small start-up. There were two requirements for the product the customer needed: database independence and it must be based on a java framework. Additionally, the team would be fairly small and we would have less than 4 month to deploy. Needless to say I felt Grails would make my life livable.

This book does a wonderful job introducing you to the Grails framework. To be honest, its hard to pick up Grails based on the documentation out on the net unless you already have experience with a similar framework. I had several members on my team that failed miserably with Grails who came from a Spring/Struts background. However, those who had Rails and Django experience could hit the ground running.

If this book came out earlier, I'm sure the 'other' developers could've had less headaches. The book holds you hand and introduces you to the simplicity this technology offers. Give Grails a shot and get this book! Yes, the framework and language isn't quite mature yet and does have a number of 'gotchas.' But with its glowing community I can see it easily improve and become a very popular choice in the job market.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Nick D on April 27, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
the intro to Groovy is good, but the Definitive Guide is a better book since it's written with a more recent version of Grails. In my opinion it's also a better beginning tutorial.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Charles Boecking on December 16, 2008
Format: Paperback
Used this book to create a prototype website in Grails. This book seemed tailor-made for the job. This book helped a small development team design, build and deploy a proof-of-concept retail site in one weekend. Our team had lots of Java experience and virtually no Groovy and Grails experience.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy Leipzig on November 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
This is a well-organized and comprehensive introduction to Grails. The reader will come away with a lot of exposure to the Grails way of doing things, which was kind of a shock for a hack like me who is used to mixing sql queries with html and changing entire schemas at a whim. The authors do not assume you know MVC or even Groovy, so I think it would be a good book for anyone with a bit of Java coding under their belt.

The source code presents some difficulties, although some of these might be attributed to Grails and Jetty. One problem is that all the collab-todo examples are called "collab-todo", which seems innocuous enough but it causes several problems as you proceed through the book. Often Grails leaves all sorts of artifacts in GRAILS_HOME that corrupts different versions of collab-todo. I found myself having to run rm -rf ~/.grails/1.0.3/projects/* before things would work properly for the next chapter. Secondly, I found it impossible to deploy multiple demo chapters at the same time, which would have been useful to see how the author edited various files to achieve increasing customization. Even when the application.properties file was altered to give the deployments different names, the lightweight jetty app server would display a "port already in use error". If I chose a new port for new deployments, there were still deployments files that were still using the directory name "collab-todo" instead of "collab-todo4", my renamed app.name, which caused all sorts of weird runtime errors. The authors and testers really should have foreseen this problem.

Another albeit smaller problem is that the .
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