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Beginning C# Objects: From Concepts to Code Paperback – May 17, 2004

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

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Grant Palmer is the author of the acclaimed Java Programmer's Reference and is a recognized expert in both the C# and Java languages. Grant has worked as a scientific programmer in the Space Technology Division at NASA's Ames Research Center for the past 20 years. This has involved working with Java since 1996, developing programs for scientific applications as well as converting older FORTRAN and C applications to the Java and C# platforms.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 819 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 1 edition (May 17, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159059360X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590593608
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.1 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,291,399 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
A monumentally comprehensive explanation of object-oriented programming, instantiated in C#. Barker and Palmer cover all the concepts of OO. But for this to be meaningful to a reader, you have to pick a language in which to express these concepts. They chose C#. In no small way because there are two OO languages in common use: C++ and Java. For each of these, you can easily find several well written books on how to implement OO in them.
Whereas C# is scarcely three years old. Certainly, there are books about it. But the authors have focussed on object modelling and use this, in a top-down fashion, to drive the description of C#'s properties.
If you are already fluent in OO from elsewhere, then you will breeze through the OO ideas here. I daresay that the authors would be the first to state that they invent nothing new in OO concepts here. But if you are new to OO, this book will certainly educate you. Though be prepared to block out a substantial number of days to go through it!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By TM on July 22, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is an outstanding book on C# objects!

The book is broken into three parts. Part One gives you the ABC?s of objects. Part Two discusses object modeling. Part Three translates a UML ?Blueprint? into C# code.

Part One is by far the best section in the book. I can honestly say I understand basic C# syntax and how objects are applied in C#. It flows very smoothly and makes learning C# very easy.

Part Two is a good introduction to UML. If you want to get into architecture, this is a good start but you will definitely more.

Part Three takes the ?blueprint? that was built in Part Two and builds the application. The first chapter of Part Three is over 100 pages of a more advanced looked at C#. Chapter 15 goes into file persistence. It was nicely laid out but I wish they had used a database instead of ASCII files. Chapter 16 ties the GUI to the business object. Personally, I think this chapter should have had a little more meat.

This book definitely gets 5 stars and if anyone ever tells me they don?t understand OOP or C#, I will tell them to read this book.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Sean Smith on October 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
I have been writing very poor C# applications for 3 years. I bought a copy of Beginning C# Objects because I wanted to learn to take advantage of all of the object oriented features of C# without having to slog through excessive examples of object-oriented theory or have to translate object-oriented lessons from other languages such as C++ or Java into C#.

This book was everything I hoped it would be. This book carries over knowledge imparted in Beginning Java Objects (Jacquie Barker Apress 2003) spending equal time discussing object-oriented theory as well as C# implementation. While most programming books rely on the reader to "read between the lines" of code examples to explain complex theory this book excels at providing clear easy-to-read well written explanations.

I especially liked the first part of the book with discussion of objects and classes, object interactions and the relationship between objects including the distinguishing features of object-oriented programming languages with relation to C#.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Martin E Underwood on July 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a good book and will teach object oriented programming much better than any other book I have read. I have read about 200 pages so far and it has been excellent. I would love to give this book 5 stars but two things a preventing that: 1. The review exercises don't have any suggested answers anywhere that I can find. 2. I have emailed the authors with no response. Other than these two problems this book is very interesting and seems to be an excellent OO book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Code Chemist on October 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
For years I suffered from confusion regarding general object-oriented methodology. I'd read books that dealt with the syntax of object-oriented features, but none of these books dealt with the big picture of object-oriented architecture. They take you through the first steps ("this is how you define a class...", "this is how one class inherits from another...", etc) but none of them dealt with the next logical phase of learning; i.e. how do you "do" object-orientation in your software? In addition to that glaring deficiency, many of the books were difficult to read, being a tad bit academic and on the dry side...and some were completely dehydrated!

Imagine my surprise when I happened upon this book. Without a doubt this was everything I needed in a book like this. Very well written with a refreshingingly informal style, the book starts out explaining C#'s syntax and powerful features. From the very beginning of the book the authors tie-in what you're learning with a case study of how to design and implement a system with a modestly complex internal data structure (a student registration system for university courses). Examples are very clear, there are plenty of nice little nuggets of advice (things that you should get in the habit of doing) and most importantly WHY you should do these things (backed up with brief, easy to understand code).

Read this book from beginning to end. Then, read it again. It's very easy reading and won't take long to get through, especially if you're familiar with many object-oriented principles. I think you'll find yourself having many "AHA!" moments when reading. You'll be on your way to being a fully competant software architect ready to take on big projects with confidence. I only wish I had a book like this 5 years ago.
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