Programming Books C Java PHP Python Learn more Browse Programming Books
Buy New
$22.00
Qty:1
  • List Price: $29.99
  • Save: $7.99 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Beginning C# Game Programming (Premier Press Game Development) Paperback – October 22, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-1592005178 ISBN-10: 1592005179 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $22.00
25 New from $17.34 37 Used from $5.09
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$22.00
$17.34 $5.09

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Beginning C# Game Programming (Premier Press Game Development) + C# Game Programming: For Serious Game Creation + Game Coding Complete, Fourth Edition
Price for all three: $93.03

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: Premier Press Game Development
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning PTR; 1 edition (October 22, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592005179
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592005178
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #154,270 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Part I - Learning C# 1. The History of C# 2. The Basics 3. A Brief Introduction to Classes 4. Advanced C# 5. One More C# Chapter Part II - Game Programming in C# 6. Setting Up a Framework 7. Direct3D 8. DirectInput 9. DirectSound 10. Putting It All Together Appendix A - Answers To Questions Appendix B - Setting Up DirectX and .NET

About the Author

Ron Penton is an independent programmer with a primary interest in computer games. He began using GW-BASIC in 1989, moved on to Visual Basic 4 in 1995, QBasic in 1996, and learned C++ in 1997. Ron began working on his degree in 1998 at the Rochester Institute of Technology, and is working on completing his Bachelors in Computer Science at the University of Buffalo. Ron contributed a chapter in the book titled ¿Game Programming All in One¿ published by Premier Press.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Don't buy/get this book.
Zvjezdan
If you're already an old hand at similar languages like Java or C++, then the first half of the book won't be much more than a refresher for you.
John Hattan
It amazes me that this book made it through technical review, if it even went through at all.
J. D. Pickwell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By John Hattan on January 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
"Beginning C# Game Programming" is Ron Penton's third effort in game book-authorship. It's a ground-up tutorial on the C# programming language, starting from the obligatory "Hello World" program and ending with a pretty rudimentary "spaceship at the bottom of the screen shooting at things coming down at you" game called "Generic Space Shooter 3000".

If you're already an old hand at similar languages like Java or C++, then the first half of the book won't be much more than a refresher for you. The first half of the book covers simple screen output, followed by primitive types, operators, looping, classes, arrays and file streams. It covers these topics fairly quickly (all in about 120 pages), so you won't be spending much time on each topic. Apart from one significant exception, the language tutorial is well-organized.

The "significant exception" raises its head with chapter 6 (creating a project). After spending 120 pages learning how to write, compile, and execute small bits of C# code, chapter 6 shows you how to set up a project in SharpDevelop (a free C# programming environment). If you need help compiling your code in chapters 1-5, the only help you'll get is a brief mention of Visual Studio.NET, SharpDevelop, or the C# command-line compiler. If you invest in a copy of "Beginning C# Game Programming", I recommend that you read chapter 6 first. Then go back to chapters 1-5. Finally, head over to chapter 7 and build yourself a space-shooter for the rest of the book.

The space shooter chapters are well-done, with good coverage of doing directX graphics in C#.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By C. Sander on February 25, 2005
Format: Paperback
You will probably want some prior programming experience to make the first 5 chapters easier to digest. I'm a seasoned C/C++ programmer, and I was able to learn C# quickly with the help of this book (although admittedly C# is very much like C++). I knew a little about DirectX, but even if I didn't this book did a great job of starting basic and building on that foundation. What I like most about this book is the author goes step by step through a simple framework which gets Direct3D up and running. In about 150 lines of code, the author manages to make a Direct3D Windows application that does something. For Windows and Direct3D this is no small accomplishment given their complexity. Other books I have seen stick the Direct3D initialization into a helper library and never bother to explain it. Not here. Each line is explained well. This book will not, however, teach you advanced Direct3D topics. Only 1 chapter describes Direct3D, but it does a good job. You will want to get another book after this one to learn more advanced topics.

If you know nothing about C# or DirectX, but have some programming experience, this book is for you. The title is very fitting of the contents. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Travis Parks on June 25, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have read a lot of Premier books in my days. One thing is constant through all of their books: they are riddled with errors. They are not complex errors that only an advanced programmer would catch - they are stupid mistakes that an author who reviewed his work would catch. What's worse, most of the authors of these game programming books have about as much experience as I do - and I haven't even worked in the field yet! For a book that spends the first 5 chapters talking about the C# language, you would think the author would realize you can't have drop-through in switch-statments and that you can't have multiple type specifiers in a for-loop header. I read these books hoping for some entertainment and to learn some new skills. I definitely get a laugh! I will say that there are some decent programming books by this joke of a publisher, but it is like navigating a mine-field. My only suggestion to beginners is to go to a site like gamedev and see what they recommend. And for the experienced programmer, I don't recommend Premier books at all. Go for a book that is not split between the language and the gaming library. If you really want, I will give you some definite reads for anyone serious about getting a head-start. For such a large, growing industry, you would think there would be better books out there. All in all, I would not put this book down entirely - it does try to present the language and still has time to cover direct3D at some point. The reality is, though, the world is not ready for C# gaming yet and anyone serious about beginning game programming should find a book using C/C++. I hope this review has not aroused too much spite on my behalf.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Tomas Jelinek on September 4, 2005
Format: Paperback
I already read this book and I must say that I am more then satisfied. This book is not for people who never wrote a line of code but if you already know how to do basics like conditions, loops, switch etc. in some language you should be able quickly understand how to do it in C# (this is meaning of first couple chapters). After that the fun begins and you are going to play with Direct3D, DirectInput, DirectSound and finally you will make an interesting spaceshooter game. I think, this book is well written but I must lower rating by 1 stars becouse the source code is made for DirectX 9.0b and sometoimes didn't work with 9.0c. Ron Penton promised that he will update it someday but it looks like he already forgot :-(

Anyway try it, it will help you lot and you should instal Managed DirectX 9.0b from the CD and everything will be alright.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?