Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Deradoorian Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage GNO Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Deal of the Day
Beijing Coma: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.00
  • Save: $7.93 (33%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Beijing Coma: A Novel has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item is gently used in good or better condition. If it is a textbook it may not have supplements. It may have some moderate wear and possibly include previous ownerâ€TMs name, some markings and/or is a former library book. We ship within 1 business day and offer no hassle returns. Big Hearted Books shares its profits with schools, churches and non-profit groups throughout New England. Thank you for your support!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

Beijing Coma: A Novel Paperback – June 9, 2009

20 customer reviews

See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$16.07
$2.76 $0.04

"The Taming of the Queen" by Philippa Gregory
By the best-selling author behind the Starz original series The White Queen, a riveting new Tudor tale featuring King Henry VIII’s sixth wife Kateryn Parr, the first English queen to publish under her own name. Learn more | See related books
$16.07 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Beijing Coma: A Novel + Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China
Price for both: $28.56

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Amazon Best of the Month, May 2008: Like a latter-day Rip Van Winkle, a troubled young man slumbers away for ten years. While he slowly retraces the experiences that brought him into this dream state, the world around him morphs into a nearly unrecognizable place. The place is not a mountain fairyland in pre-Revolutionary America, but China at the turn of the twenty-first century. And, our story's hero is not a beleaguered farmer seeking solace among the mountains and rivers, but a promising graduate student named Dai Wei who was shot in the head during the pro-democracy protests in 1989 at Tiananmen Square. Beijing Coma is an unexpectedly visceral and daring work of fiction by critically acclaimed author Ma Jian that explores why a promising young student would risk it all in the spring of 1989. In this ingeniously constructed novel--which sets Dai Wei's internal recollections against the contemporary changes occurring beyond him--Ma Jian reveals the profound personal consequences of that historic struggle for freedom--long after the CNN cameras stopped rolling. --Lauren Nemroff --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

The outcome of this bleak, wrenching generational saga from Ma Jian (Stick Out Your Tongue and The Noodle Maker) is known from early on: the politicization of Dai Wei, a diligent molecular biology Ph.D. student at Beijing University, ends in Tiananmen Square with a bullet striking him in the head. As the book opens, Dai Wei is just waking from a coma that has continued over 10 years following the June 4, 1989, massacre—still apparently unconscious, but actually aware of his surroundings. The narrative then alternates between Dai Wei's very conscious observations as a nonresponsive ''vegetable'' over the years of his coma, and his childhood and student life. Ma Jian evokes the horrors of an oppressive regime in minute, gruesome detail, particularly in quotidian scenes of his mother's attempts to care for Dai Wei, which eventually lead her to a member of the banned Falun Gong movement. The book's behind-the-scenes portrayal of the nascent student movement hinges on repetitious ideological bickering and sexual power plays. Lengthy expositions of Dai Wei's condition slow the book further, but Ma Jian achieves startling effects through Dai Wei's dispassionate narration, making one man's felled body a symbol of lost possibility. (June)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 720 pages
  • Publisher: Picador; Reprint edition (June 9, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312428367
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312428365
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #348,975 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By K. Noe on July 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ma Jian's Beijing Coma was a really enlightening novel. I learned so much about China- the good and the bad. This novel exposed me for the first time to the horrifying Cultural Revolution and the Tiananmen Square massacre- really important events that no one bothered to teach in high school history. What you find in this book will alternatively inspire and infuriate you, and at no time will Ma Jian leave you feeling apathetic.
The writing in this novel is unique. The narration is delivered with a certain sparsity and emotionless quality, but is occasionally punctuated with incredibly poignant and striking images and revelations that take you aback and force you to pause and reflect. The novel reminds me a bit of the fiction of Sartre and Camus, but with distinguishing elements that are Ma Jian's own.
In any case, the novel is brilliant. Read it. It is an accessible opportunity to experience the richness of another culture's literature.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By mom of 2 on August 9, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Ma Jian's Beijing Coma is very well written, albeit with a bit of the stilted sound you get when Chinese is translated to English. (Readers of this book might also want to read Life and Death in Shanghai by Nien Cheng, a fascinating, brutal, nonfiction work describing the author's incarceration during the Cultural Revolution. I learned a lot about the Cultural Revolution from that book.)

Beijing Coma is narrated by the character of Dai Wei, a molecular biology doctoral student in Beijing. Caught up in the pro-democracy student-led protests leading up to the massacre at Tiananmen Square in 1989, Dai Wei is shot in the head and lapses into a coma. Despite his appearance as a "vegetable," he is sentient, his sense of hearing and smell intensified greatly in compensation for his loss of sight and speech.

I was a child during the Cultural Revolution and never knew anything about it; it was amazing to me, upon reading Cheng's book mentioned above, that this could have happened in my lifetime. I was an adult during the protests in Tiananmen Square and followed the news coverage of that time. Despite this, I was astounded, in reading Beijing Coma, at descriptions of life under the Chinese government, at the bravery of the students and others who participated in the protests, and, especially, at the long-term ramifications that participation in the protests had on the students and citizens. For example, no doctor will treat or even examine Dai Wei once they learn he received his wound at Tiananmen Square. Everyone is terrified of the government.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Michael A. Dawson on November 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I was fascinated by the premise of 'Beijing Coma' and was eager to gain insight on the Chinese Student Movement of the late 80's. However, contrary to most reviews, I found the pace to be rather slow and the details of the story to be rather repetitive. Too much of the novel are students arguing with each other about policy and the plot suffers as a result. At 650 pages, it's not a short book and I think it would have benefited from a better editing job. Also, I found the quotes that broke up the chapters to be incredibly pretentious and unnecessary. Perhaps they worked well in the original Chinese but in English they do not. Would only recommend to those seriously interested in an evolving China.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Barrett TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Before hating me for giving this two stars, let me say that I am a huge fan of Ma Jian's short stories. I feel that they are expressive, to the point, and haunting.

This novel touched on the student movement of the late 80s leading up to the Tienanmen Square massacre. I have always held a fascination for the history of China and enjoy authors such as Yiyun Li, Ha Jin, and Yu Hua (among others). Though the novel does take one on a historical journey through this tumultuous time, it has some problems.

First, the novel is far too long. Ma Jian spends a lot of page on minor or unimportant characters and repetitive arguments. I understand that the student movement suffered from poor leadership and constant power struggles, but the entire middle 1/3 of the novel is an endless repetition of arguing, distributing food, arguing, smoking, fighting off power struggles, striking, arguing.

The translation was good, but filled with far too many British idioms and slang (would be like an American translation that kept saying 'hoodie' instead of sweatshirt... you get the idea? Often cigarettes were called 'fags', shoes called 'trainers', and so on). This was never an issue with Flora's translation of Ma Jian's short stories.

The beginning few chapters and last few chapters were great. The final events of the massacre were pretty graphically written... so be forewarned.

I usually get through books pretty quickly, but this took quite a bit of my patience to push through the middle section. So much that I almost stopped reading.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Raymond Cooper on November 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This was a very strange book, but then all of Ma Jian's books, even his memoir Red Dust are out there on the edge. The premise was an interesting one- tell the story of 1989 from inside the head of one of its victims, now in a coma. I have read a lot of books on 20th century Chinese history, and even though this book was fiction, much of the picture of Tiananmen Square rang true. I found it fascinating how petty the student leaders became at times in this story. If this was in fact a somewhat accurate depiction, it adds to the real story of what happened. Ma Jian is a good storyteller, and even though this was a long book with a lot of characters and sub-plots, I enjoyed it immensely. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Beijing Coma: A Novel
This item: Beijing Coma: A Novel
Price: $16.07
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Want to discover more products? Check out these pages to see more: marlboro cigarettes carton, cigarettes carton