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On Being Black and Reformed: A New Perspective on the African-American Christian Experience Paperback – October 1, 2003


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On Being Black and Reformed: A New Perspective on the African-American Christian Experience + The Decline of African American Theology: From Biblical Faith to Cultural Captivity + Glory Road: The Journeys of 10 African-Americans into Reformed Christianity
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 153 pages
  • Publisher: P & R Publishing (October 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875527957
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875527956
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #107,110 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

This book needed to be written, and more importantly it needs to be read. -- —Keith A. Mathison, Ligonier Ministries

This book needed to be written, and more importantly it needs to be read. --—Keith A. Mathison, Ligonier Ministries

About the Author

Anthony J. Carter (M.A.B.S., Reformed Theological Seminary) is cofounder of the Black Alliance for Reformed Theology, its director of ministry, and editor of its online journal, Vinedresser. He is assistant pastor for preaching and teaching at Southwest Christian Fellowship, Atlanta.

More About the Author

A graduate of Reformed Theological Seminary in Orlando, FL, and Point University of East Point, GA, Tony is lead pastor of East Point Church, East Point, GA. He is author of several books including "On Being Black and Reformed"; and "What is the Gospel: Life's Most Important Question". He is co-author and editor of "Experiencing the Truth: Bringing the Reformation to the African-American Church"; and "Glory Road: The Journeys of Ten African Americans into Reformed Christianity." Pastor Tony live in East Point GA with his wife and five children.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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In fact, Carter's style is clear and fluid.
Ra McLaughlin
These men are among our spiritual fathers, and we owe them a great debt of gratitude.
Dan Q
Please purchase this book, read it and pass it along.
Lionel Damon Woods

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Ra McLaughlin on January 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book was a hard read. Not because it's language is difficult -- it isn't. In fact, Carter's style is clear and fluid. And not because the concepts are intricate -- they're not. The ideas are actually rather straightforward. And it wasn't that I disliked the content, because as uncomfortable as the truth might be, I still prefer it to complacency.
This book was a hard read because it's painful to think about the way black Christians have been mistreated by white Christians throughout American history. And it was a harder read because it points out that mistreatment continues. It was hard because it made me weep for my brethren of all races, and because it made me hunger for reconciliation that I cannot reach quickly enough. In short, it was hard because it was real. And in this case, reality is hard.
But it's not bitter. In fact, the book is anything but a tirade against the oppressor. It's pastoral. It's insightful. It's forgiving. It inspires compassion. And it's wise, written by a man that has personally jumped the chasm and tied his rope to both sides, and who now shows all of us how to do the same so that together we might build a bridge.
Thanks, Pastor Carter, for loving the church enough to write this, for loving truth enough to be honest and accurate, and for loving Christ enough to do it with a shepherd's hand.
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15 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Kathy F. Cannata on October 24, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There is nothing groundbreaking here. Carter does not uncover any grand new paradigm for understanding race relations and the Church. What he gives us is just a wonderful, accessible, little primer on the relationship and history of Reformed faith and the African American experience. Frankly, it reads alot like a very well done seminary term paper. But he defines all the key issues and decisively answers many questions.

It is painful to see so few blacks in the Reformed movement, but Carter shows this has not always been and does not have to always be. In fact, much of the black American experience should (and sometimes has) make them especially well-suited for a Reformed theological perspective. When this has failed to be the case, the blame lies with both whites and blacks. Both have neglected important elements of the Gospel, and the result has been a sad lack of a dynamic Reformed witness in the black community. Carter's critique is biting, but never angry or hurtful.

I bought four copies of this book. I think every seminarian, pastor, and church officer, at minimum, should read this.

(BTW -- As result of the footnotes in this book I bought two copies of Black Puritan, Black Republican, which was somewhat dissappointing and dry. It tells a great story, but 90% of it I could have gleaned forma book review or even the dust jacket).
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. F Foster on May 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
Anthony Carter has done the church a great service in giving us this book. While Carter focuses on the relationship between African Americans and the Reformed church community, much of what he says is also applicable to wider evangelicalism. Evangelicals really need to hear Carter on a number of things.

First, white evangelicals have to realize that their Christian experience is predominately a Caucasian-cultured experience. Too many white evangelicals tacitly walk around assuming that their Christianity is a universal expression that is universally applicable, rather than a culturally conditioned expression that only represents a slice of the Christian experience. This is vitally important to reckon with. Most evangelicals are not racist, and their top-level orientation is desirous of racial reconciliation within the church and larger culture. This is very good. But in failing to realize the degree to which our Christianity is a 'white Christianity', we greatly hinder our efforts at diversity and fail to realize how inhospitable and exclusive we are, even though our church doors are wide open. A rather vicious circular state results, in which we desire greater diversity, but are too inflexible about our worship and preaching to encourage it, so diversity never happens even though we say we're committed to it. All of this is the result of believing that our particular expression of Christianity is universally normative. This is what needs to change, and Carter does a great job of demonstrating this.

Carter also highlights the very real power of worship to supernaturally change things. This is one of the great truths of Christianity that the African American Christian expression gives such wonderful voice to.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Philip S Roeda on January 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
How does Culture effect theology? How does ones place in society effects the individuals understanding of the Bible and truths about God? This work presents arguments to why predestination is hard for the African American community to accept. How could an all powerful, all knowing and loving God permit slavery of one race and not another? The author presents a straight forward argument for Calvinism. He also pleads that that it is the correct theology of the bible. The author presents a clear history of black enslavement in the United States, why the slaveholder taught Christianity to his property, and the segregation of the Christian Church in these United States.

The reasons for segregation in some churches was caused by complex theology. Carter argues that this was the main cause why
the Presbyterian faith did not catch on with slaves and former slaves. The Baptist church became segregated by out right segregation in the sitting (Blacks to balcony) for Sunday Worship, and/or rudeness to those of darker complexions.

The book is a good read. The author argues for a black theology that incorporates blacks culture, Black History, and Calvinistic teachings. No clear insight is given to how this can be accomplished.
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