Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Being a Brain-Wise Therapist: A Practical Guide to Interpersonal Neurobiology (Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology)
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on July 6, 2008
This book fills the gap between theory and practice. The author does a superb job of applying interpersonal neurobiology to the "doing-ness" of therapy, in the room, with real patients/clients. She's particularly adept at capturing the subtle, non-verbal experience of what it actually feels like to sit with a patient during moments of intense emotional upheavals. She skillfully weaves together the theory and the practice; reading her book has affected my own practice and has increased my awareness of how I am "being," moment to moment, with my patients. I highly recommend this book to everyone who is interested in contemporary neuroscience findings--especially and particularly to practitioners of psychotherapy who want to apply neuroscience findings to their clinical practices.
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on August 25, 2008
Start Here with Being a Brain-Wise Therapist- the most recent and integrated book on the path to learning about Interpersonal Neurobiology. Well-written and easy to read...Bonnie has written an informative and enjoyable book after having digested and practiced the latest information on the brain and relationships. The book is based on her years of experience as a therapist, educator, and mindfulness practitioner. She utilizes the latest information from personal conversations with leading neuroscientists, collaborating on written submissions for the Global Association of Interpersonal Neurobiology (mindgains.org), her own research, and her extensive practice which includes supervising interns and colleagues. Just like the smart, warm, and supportive woman she is, Bonnie Badenoch has found a way to nurture our understanding of the brain and relationships throughout this compelling book.
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on September 11, 2008
BEING A BRAIN-WISE THERAPIST: A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO INTERPERSONAL NEUROBIOLOGY adds to Norton's Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology and provides college-level counseling students and practitioners with a powerful review of the basics on brain structure, function, and neurobiological theories. Exercises and case histories accompany wide-ranging discussions of spirituality, brain injury, personality changes, and more. It's a discussion no mental health and psychology library collection should omit.
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on August 11, 2008
What a wonderful integration of neuroscience with compassionate psychotherapy! The author does a very skillful job of making the complexities of neuroscience understandable, and integrating this information with the clinical applications that are necessary to making it work on a practical level. Required reading for my intern therapists...
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on August 22, 2008
This book does what it proclaims: Translating the most recent brain research into ways that psychotherapists can effectively work with their clients.
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on February 6, 2009
This book was a major disappointment, as it doesn't live up to the quality of other books in the Norton Interpersonal Neurobiology series. This book is pretty much a basic (and at times concrete) distillation of Daniel Siegal's two books. It attempts to apply Siegal's (and Allan Schore's) ideas to the pratice of psychotherapy, but does so in a overly simplistic and flowery manner. If you want an introduction to Siegal's and Schore's work then I recommend that you read instead Cozolino's books on neuroscience of psychotherapy and human relationships. They are much more solid and sophisticated in their presentation of these ideas. However, I believe the best synthesis of these topics (attachment theory, mentalization, neuroscience of psychotherpay, relational psychanalysis, mindfulness)is Wallin's "Attachment in Psychotherapy." This is truly a brilliant synthesis of these ideas and their practical application to the consulting room. I couldn't recommend Wallin's book more.
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on January 11, 2009
This amazing book is itself an IPNB experience. As a clinician as well as being on the receiving end of therapy, I was more than educated. I was touched both emotionally and cognitively by this work of art and science.
Ms. Badenoch takes the reader by the hand as her equal and walks her through the neuroscience with ease and grace. Her unique ability to elucidate difficult concepts makes the reader feel like an active partner, rather than a passive listener, in her personal journey through this learning experience. In essence, this book kindled my soul and on the brain level, I could actually feel the synapses firing and the forging of new neural circuits.
This book is truly for everyone; a virtual gift of hope in a world so desperately in need of compassion.
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on January 18, 2014
A solid, professional exploration of the neurological environment of individuals manifesting psychiatric diagnoses. Well-written and imminently readable discussion of how the limbic system responds to psychotherapy which addresses the needs of vulnerable individuals.
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on December 1, 2009
I found this book to be extremely articulate and demonstrative of what I have found intuitively in my own practice as a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. It further validated the helpfulness of therapeutic relationship with the client, art therapy, sand tray therapy/sand play, and other therapeutic tools that help bring about integration. Now I have the brain research, neurobiology terminology to help my clients understand what we are doing in therapy and how their brain "nets" play a role in their overall mental/emotional health. My clients are fascinated to learn about the brain and attachment and it has helped the therapeutic process along in many situations.
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on September 18, 2012
For being as technical as it is, Badenoch's book is readable, intriguing and engaging! Explanations of neurobiology are clearly given with practical applications for brain-based effective therapy. I felt fortunate to have read the book prior to hearing the author speak at the Iowa Annual Play Therapy conference! I highly recommend this book and the accompanying workbook.
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