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37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
The supernatural gang has left Bristol behind, but leaving the past behind is a little harder.

And "Being Human Season 3" is all about the bloody, terrifying past catching up to the main characters, whether it's an amnesiac vampire or a mass murder on a subway. The writers manage to throw some interesting curveballs into the characters' lives, but Aidan Turner's tormented vampire is the best part of it all.

Nina, George and Mitchell have purchased a small Welsh B&B as their new home, and everything seems potentially perfect... except Annie is trapped in purgatory, and she's headed for hell. Desperate to save her, Mitchell follows a newly-dead spirit into purgatory, where he is faced with his bloodiest sins -- and a prophecy that a "werewolf-shaped bullet" will kill him.

So the reunited gang continues trying to have a normal life, grappling with "normal" problems and supernatural ones, including a vampiric teenager, a tragic zombie, cage-fights, evil vampire suburbanites, and a pair of werewolves living in the woods. But things take a horrifying turn when George finds that Herrick has somehow come back to life -- and though he doesn't seem to remember who he is/was, he hasn't lost his evil. And after Herrick causes another horrifying incident, Mitchell's desperation will lead to another tragedy...

"Being Human Season Three" might as well be called the "Mitchell Season," because Aidan Turner really steals the show: Mitchell is tormented by the Box Tunnel Massacre, his fear of being caught, and his ever-growing terror of his impending death. Turner is absolutely sublime, slowly ramping up Mitchell's fear, desperation and erraticism as the season goes on, until it seems like the vampire is about to crack.

Not that the other characters get shortchanged, because they get plenty of attention too. Annie really blossoms when she begins an undead romance with Mitchell. George and Nina have to grapple with a very common problem when Nina becomes pregnant, and George also has to deal with his father's recent death.

And the writers make this season a pretty solid one, twisting together multiple dark storylines about revenge, hatred, suspicion and (of course) the Box Tunnel Massacre. It grows tenser and bleaker as the season goes on, and the seemingly-solid relationships between the housemates start to fray. And even the one-off plots seem to be a bit darker, although the vampire-teen one was hilarious. It finishes up on the single darkest episode of the whole series.

But there are some funny moments (George's repeated lament that "I only wanted a pee!"), as well as some touching moments (Nina asking George if he wants to "have a little hairy baby" with her).

"Being Human Season Three" just shows that even vampires and werewolves can't run away from their problems -- and when their problems catch up, things get messy.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on January 14, 2012
My review on the show itself.....
Being Human, all seasons so far, is a completely unique show. This show offers drama, action, and suspense mixed with some dark British humor and some sex appeal. What's not to love?

And on the other hand, my review for the DVDs.....
I have loved this show since the odd pilot aired that had a few different cast members. I first watched the Being Human Seasons one, two, and three on UK's BBC. I went to watch them on BBC America, and a lot is edited out. Because I loved the original shows I saw, I decided to order them on DVD (hoping they would not be edited). Nevertheless, I was shocked and disappointed when I ordered them in Region 1 US DVD Format. I found that the available US Format is put out by BBC America and that the BBC America versions are completely edited. The US Format DVDs for this show lose a lot of the British Humor due to editing (US censorship-Go Figure).

So, I guess I will be buying a Region Free DVD Player and trying to find a Region 2 UK Format Version, hopefully the unedited British version with the curse words, sex scenes, and nudity left in. I loved BBC shows, and I wonder if I'm the only American who noticed when we got switched to BBC America (a poor comparison to the actual British Network that we lost).
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on April 27, 2011
I can't even watch the American version now. This show is so much better and has a quicker pace. Plus I think Aidan Turner is the only man who can be menacing and sexy simultatiously.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful
Our little gang has been through a lot in a small amount of time. Annie vanished after the 2nd season and Mitchell has an idea on how to get her back. Before that, however, a little matter has to be dealt with. Apparently the madness that Mitchell and Diasy undertook then is now known as the BoxTunnel 20, attributingh 20 deaths to the unknown. Mitchell and his mates move before more cna be established, and that leads to new things. More wolves, more vampires, a zombie, and some other surprises are in store, not to mention a little thing called Herrick and a Wolf-Shaped bullet. It gets interesting.

This season had a lot that a few didn't, and I think I like this development. In the beginning it was harder to plug into Annie and to Nina sometimes, but for different reasons. For men, Nina always seemed like a wrecking ball, and George always found himself under some debris she had pried loose. After the last season there was an opening, however, and the writers put her and George together in somewhat of a normal life. Other loves and relationships appear as well, and the house seems to have an energy to it. These cannot be left alone to develop, however, and things like a ghostly victim kind of cleach with a Boxtunnel killer.

Sometimes I am not a fan of complication, but I am that here.

Another beautiful thing is the addition of more supernatural. Two werewolves wander in and so do other vampires, and even a zombie. The way they come in is nice, too, and I like some of the things brought out by them. Before, every idea of the supernatural focused on the three housemates. You got some people in a pressure cooker of sorts, and you got some people trying out things that were ghostly - etc. This is different. While the zombie is a direct relation to something that happens, not everyone is. Some of the vampires simply exist, the wolves are, and so on. Couple this with some angry spirits and you understand a bunch.

The stories are, mostly, the best the series has had. When the idea of Annie is produced to the stuff between George and Nina, it was exciting. Even Karen and Herrick and other things oyu knew were coming do not come straight at you. Its nice and its fun. You see a lot of things behind the proverbial walls, showing you more of that world. Since all of them living together would be a new experience, it is interesting to watch - although some characters seem to think they are abover their prospective curses.

If I were going to note one real problem, I might say that I did not liek the ending and Mitchell in it. I know this builds him and shows his want to be humanlike, but he went a long way. FGranted, he is damaged and feels damned but he is only so self-destructive. Otherwise, he would not have gone 90 years or more. That said, it all does connect the roomies more, but the things that are said note how things will always be different. In some ways, I thought this was a little off.

If you want special features, you get a little from the set but not a lot. you asically have some talk, some deleted scenes, and a few things that are not that important - like trailers. Still, i liked the series a lot and am judging this on the notion that it is the show and how good it looks, not extra material, that matters. According, I have to give it a solid 5/5.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
I will briefly say, The Being Human series is one of the most well done "horror" shows I have ever watched...From the inception of Three Supes trying to make it in a "normal" world, to the story lines, directing, acting...CGI...all is exceptional...No one who embraces SuperNatural stories will be disappointed.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
George and Nina are off to find out what is going to happen if they come to term with a little hairy bundle of joy. this leads them toward what mitchell fears the worst - a werewolf that might happen to be the last thing he sees. Mitchell has his own things to think about anyhow, because he and Annie are trying to become more than just roomies. The problem is the "how" in the union; being dead and undead doesn't leave a lot of room for love.

This episode centers around a werewolf father and son duo, and how they can help George and Nina. The story they have is interesting and insightful, too, and it makes for more on that front. It also shows something about Mitchell and the wolf in this, and it says something with regard to wolves and vamps in general. Combine that with the humor and with the other elements that power the show and you can see it is on this season and then some. In fact, this has been some of the best stuff in a long time, overshadowing many shows that might try to be horror because of its unique elements.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Though I suspect the theme has always been there, only with Season 3 have I realized that this is an essentially religious narrative. But it's a religion in which God plays little. Unlike prior seasons, this one has little mention of organized religion or church, and when George stands over a dying man, he can't even remember the words to the Shema. Instead, this religion pits the communion of the house against the greedy individualism of the larger world.

This bleak vision of Wales, all shabby brick and abandoned industrial iron, creates a look of despair and desolation. Which probably explains why they have the Hawaii mural in their house: they've build a paradise within their own walls. In a significant deleted scene from episode 2, Annie calls Mitchell her "saviour." These characters' ad hoc religion lets them resist a bleak and godless world through the sacrament of just remaining together.

Notably, when Mitchell crosses into the afterlife to retrieve Annie, he describes the place he finds as "Purgatory." The place of purging, where sins are expunged by recognition and contrition. This religion doesn't have much need for Heaven or Hell, God or Satan, but it prizes guilt and culpability. The only hope against encroaching struggle and despair comes in unity and society. Notice how militantly individualistic the other vampires and werewolves are.

This makes their house a monastery. The characters eat together, find love within their own walls, and "pray" as a group by standing together against their damaged natures. But without a shared theology, they have to face their sins directly. Without Jesus to save or Buddha to guide, their religion makes them remember their sins over and over again. They persevere, not to save their own souls, but because they can only be saved together.

This season's deep immersion in death and the afterlife is much darker than previous seasons. As our heroes aid zombies while fighting wolves and vampires, they stand together against the world, becoming stronger only as a group. Though they have an evangelism program, inasmuch as they reach out to McNair and the resurrected Herrick, sin constantly comes from outside. Without God, they only have each other. But is that enough?
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 6, 2011
Love the series. While the US version is OK, the UK version is the one I saw first and I like the characters (except Annie - I love her!) I mean really, a Vampire, werewolf and ghost with English accents! The fact it has a neat plotline also helps.

I grabbed and viewed the episodes as fast as possible on iTunes and grabbed the DVDs to watch whenever I want.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
The last season left us with Annie being left somewhere beyond and with Mitchell longing for her to come back. As he says late ron, you don't know what you have until it is gone. Nina and her man are together here, too, and our four set out to find themselves a new place. It seems that the last season left its scars on them all, and they are still determined to find annie and to see what the world has for them all.

This is where we find out what, exactly, the world has in store for werewolves and vampires. I do not want to ruin anything so I will only say that this is where our werewolf bullet episodes start. It is also an episodes that has some little things that follow in its wake, and it shows us some interesting things that happened with Mitchell.

I liked this one a lot because it has a lot of everything when it comes to humor, violence, and setting up the plot. It also shows us what Mitchell was and what the "boxcar 20" really were, and how much Mitchell was in life. It also shows us a little wolfing, and it sets up something between George and Nina.

A great season, you can see it now. Great video downloads, too. 5/5
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 12, 2011
**Spoiler Alert. There may be spoilers here, so if you want to remain a Being Human "virgin", don't read below.

It is a little tough watching the American version knowing that the BBC version is not only in its 3rd series, but the BBC version is more original simply for having set the stage for SYFY.

Don't get me wrong, the American actors are fine and their performances are great, but the british cast "own" these roles. It's almost like the Americans are renting theirs. The BBC characters seem more fallible, more realisting, and belong to their roles. It is like the BBC wrote characters to best suit the actors, and in the SYFY version, they did the opposite, but to a somewhat disconcordant effect.

That sounds more negative then it is intended, but I did not like the twist at the end of the American season when the werewolf Josh (played by Sam Huntington) is hoodwinked into sitting out the grande finale battle royale. Perhaps the SYFY ending was more fitting, as it felt truer to the logic of their universe.

Case in point, a man of twenty-something has very little chance of outfoxing a man of 300 who is perpetually on his toes and a master of his powers (SYFY). What the BBC version suggested is that in the heat of combat both 150-something Mitchell (Aidan Turner) and Herrick [an ancient vampire with full acceptance (and thus, control) of his powers and senses; played by Jason Watkins], are duped by the silly, often-unwieldy George (played by Russel Tovey), one into making ready for a battle royale that will never happen, and the other getting locked in the basement with the werewolf. Herrick HAD to see that coming.

In this BBC season-concluding episode, there is faithfulness to each performance and plot that is rarely seen in this type of horror/sci-fi drama.

Oh, and Lenora Crichlow is a slamming hotty. Meaghan Rath seems a far more morose, whiny version of the ghostly-friend. I would rather spend eternity with a chipper Annie and her endless tea-making than Sally-sulks-a-lot, moping and pouting. That would drive me bonkers. If Sally doesn't cheer up in season 2 of SYFY, I'm not sure if I can stomach it.

Kristen Hager has better looks than Sinead Keenan. That's all I have to say on that matter. It feels like each series picked the correct actress to play across from their dopey werewolf roomie. Still, Nina seems a little more realistic in the role because she's not physically perfect. She is charming, and has a flair for the character. Kristen is believable as a young doctor in Boston, although I can't quite place why her character would hang around with Josh. I think given their dispositions, the only thing keeping these two characters together is the script.
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