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Bell E-Z Trainer Wheels


Price: $20.00 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
In Stock.
Sold by Top To Bottom and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
  • The Bell E-Z Trainer Wheels feature patented coiled springs to keep the wheels on the ground all the time
  • Easy to install
  • Fits bikes 12-Inch to 20-Inch
26 new from $7.18
$20.00 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In Stock. Sold by Top To Bottom and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Bell E-Z Trainer Wheels + Bike Trainer Handle + Balance Buddy (Adjustable)
Price for all three: $58.41

Buy the selected items together

Technical Details


Product Description

Help your little one learn to ride with the Bell E-Z Trainer training wheels. Installation is easy: adjust the wheel nuts, slip the hooks over the axles, and you're ready to go riding! The coiled design lets the bicycle lean slightly during turns.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7 x 2.4 inches ; 2.3 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Shipping: This item is also available for shipping to select countries outside the U.S.
  • ASIN: B001UECLPW
  • Item model number: 1003550
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #20,037 in Sports & Outdoors (See Top 100 in Sports & Outdoors)
  • Product Warranty: For warranty information about this product, please click here

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Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

These wheels are truly "training wheels".
The Phantom
That leaves plenty of room to remove to simply remove the outer nuts, slide the training wheels with bracket over the axle and tighten everything back up.
Mark L. Shimonek
At the end of this I was given the option of writing to them a second time to ask if I still wanted to return the product.
ReverendMike

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By den71 on March 22, 2011
We got some hand-me down bikes for my four year olds and they kept having trouble with the more traditional training wheels. On one (traditional kind), a metal fork would keep slipping out of place, causing the wheel to flip upward and the bike to fall over. On the other, the soft metal would bend, so that one wheel would ride progressively higher and my son would become tilted as he rode. I figured the spring-action should resist that problem.

Putting on the wheels was fairly simple. The old training wheels were attached so that they were sandwiched between two nuts on the central bolt. With the new training wheels, I simply fitted them right up against the fork of the frame and secured it with a single nut. There is a metal bracket with a small tooth on it that fits right into the fork so that it does not swivel. Therefore, it requires the training wheel to be mounted close (using one bolt, not two). The stem-loop of the wheels slides up and down to adjust for different sizes, but cinches down snugly. It is possible that the previous reviewers tried to attach the training wheels using the two nut configuration, which would not work on my kids' bikes either. However, I wasn't there, so I won't judge.

The first ride was a night and day difference for my son. The wheels flexed with his shifting weight and resumed their natural position. I noticed he wasn't always getting good contact with the ground, so a simple adjustment by sliding the stem-loop fixed it. As I watched him, I noticed that the wheels maintained contact with the ground, even when the pavement was uneven. All was not perfect--there were a few times when he leaned too far into a curve and the bike tipped, but on the whole it went well.
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21 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Eric J. Bly on September 28, 2012
First, I will say that I did not purchase these from Amazon or any of their partner companies.

For those that think these are the types of training wheels we all learned on you are sadly mistaken. They are a spring and they flex, . . .a lot. After I installed them, my daughter got on and the bike flexed at least 20 degrees to either side. Needless to say she freaked out! My daughter would not get back on the bike even with me holding on to it.

The springs are way too flexible for a child that is just learning to ride. They might be a good second stage for a child that is extremely comfortable on a bike with standard training wheels. For those with children that are just learning STAY AWAY from this style of training wheels!
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By WahooMom on May 19, 2013
The bracket for these training wheels are much to large you need a very long rear axel to attach to a bike wheel and most do not have an axel big enough.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Mark L. Shimonek on June 24, 2014
Don't buy these. If you already bought them take them back. If you can't take them back don't ever go back to the store that sold them.

If you already have them with no hope of getting your money back, here is how to make them work.

The problem: If you look close at the manufacturer's picture of them installed, you will see that the axle sticks out past the bike frame by about an inch on each side. That leaves plenty of room to remove to simply remove the outer nuts, slide the training wheels with bracket over the axle and tighten everything back up. News flash Bell, bikes don't come with oversize axles. They come with axles that are long enough for you to put a nut on, that's it!

Instructions: Pull the rear wheel completely off the bike. There will be two nuts that hold the axle in place. Remove them. I had to remove one nut then use a pair of locking pliers to hold the axle while removing the other nut. At this point, the axle was gouged to the point that it would not go back in the wheel. If this happens to you, use a file to smooth them out again. Then wipe the metal filings off so they don't ruin your bearings. Put the wheel back together sans nuts. Send your kids to their room so they won't hear you swear. Now put the brackets on either axle. The flat side faces the hub, the tab faces out. Put the training wheels on now. Put the outer nuts on. Tighten them just enough that the training wheels don't fall off. Put the chain back on the sprocket and try to get the assembly back on the bike. Having someone hold the bike frame while trying to wedge the wheel back on helps. Tighten the nuts and don't ever buy anything from Bell again.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By PapaEJangles on June 8, 2011
Verified Purchase
I purchased these trainers after attempting to use the "Schwinn Girl Bicycle Training Wheels". The issues I was looking to resolve were: increased height for a 20" bike; wheels which can tolerate normal use on sidewalks and pavement; increased stability / able to maintain fixed position when in use.

This set actually surprised me in how well it resolved those issues. The wheels are a durable plastic. I would have preferred metal, but the plastic in this construction is neither flimsy nor excessively rigid. Thus, it will flex as needed, and it will not be destroyed by the vibrations of the road. The tires are rubber, or a material that is very similar to it. I feel that this feature makes the overall stability improved substantially.

The spring design is very clever, and it is very strong. The configuration appears that it would resist the fatigue other configurations might exhibit over the course of normal child usage, simply because it is designed to flex, while not being "bouncy".

The key factor which this design resolves is its ability to maintain its position when mounted on the bike. The bracket used to clamp to the bike works like a cotter pin which is positioned on the rear fork, ahead of the axle. It is difficult to see in the imagery provided here, but it is the one factor which makes this set superior over any other in this price range.

The point which could be improved on this design is not actually part of this set. I found that mounting the trainer on the chain side of the bike was exceptionally difficult. The axle bolt is not quite long enough to accommodate the clamp and the "spring support arms". I managed to adjust the position of the bolt so that there was enough exposure to thread a nut. However, I am nervous about it. If kid bikes would include a longer rear axle bolt to meet the needs of such a common attachment site it would be a perfect configuration.
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