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The Ghost Belonged To Me (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) School & Library Binding – September 1, 1997

Book 1 of 4 in the Blossom Culp Series

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"More death! More, if you do not stop it. Others lost, like me in the black water. Save them!"

When Alexander first sees the eerie glow in the dormer window of the barn, it sets his heart pounding. And when he ventures into the barn in the dark of night, his breath catches in his throat. Suddenly Blossom Culp's words come back to him: "You can make contact with the Unseen...." Now there's a girl ghost standing right in front of him, telling him of great danger ahead. But is there time for Alexander to act on her warning? --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • School & Library Binding: 159 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback (September 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0881039330
  • ISBN-13: 978-0881039337
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,991,695 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Richard Peck has written over twenty novels, and in the process has become one of America's most highly respected writers for young adults. A versatile writer, he is beloved by middle graders as well as young adults for his mysteries and coming-of-age novels. He now lives in New York City. In addition to writing, he spends a great deal of time traveling around the country attending speaking engagements at conferences, schools and libraries...Mr. Peck has won a number of major awards for the body of his work, including the Margaret A. Edwards Award from School Library Journal, the National Council of Teachers of English/ALAN Award, and the 1991 Medallion from the University of Southern Mississippi. Virtually every publication and association in the field of children s literature has recommended his books, including Mystery Writers of America which twice gave him their Edgar Allan Poe Award. Dial Books for Young Readers is honored to welcome Richard Peck to its list with Lost in Cyberspace and its sequel The Great Interactive Dream Machine...

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
79%
4 star
14%
3 star
7%
2 star
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See all 29 customer reviews
I read this book in the 8th grade.
Teresa M. Scudder
I wanted to read Richard Peck's THE GHOST BELONGED TO ME because I heard this was the book that Disney based the TV movie--(Child of Glass [VHS]--on.
Alex Honda
I highly recommend this book to almost anybody.
Garrett M. Imeson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Stephan Stuecklin on December 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
I'm twenty-three years old, so not necessarily the typical age to read this book, which is aimed at a younger readership. Nevertheless, I very much enjoyed this story, whose main draw are its vivid characters with their different idiosyncrasies, especially the underappreciated Blossom and the sweetly naive Alexander.
Peck starts off by writing a summary of the story in the first chapter, which helps a lot in keeping the reader interested during the somewhat lengthy (but necessary) opening part which introduces the main characters. Ably and wittily Peck illustrates the contrasting mannerisms of Alexander's family, and his keen sense of observation makes this unlikely group seem all the likelier.
Since the title contains the word "ghost", one expects magic in this story; the magic to me is the nostalgic wholeness of a world in which despite quarrels and fights a family stays together, and where quite obviously a protecting hand brings and holds things and people together. At odds with my experience of my world, this book creates a yearning for a better place inside of me, a place where modesty, honesty and trust receive the honor and reward they deserve.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
In 1913 in Bluff City, Missouri, Alexander Arnsworth has seen the eerie glow of a ghost in the barnloft window so often he's come to think of the ghost as "belonging to me." Alexander's plucky friend, Blossom Culp, lives on the other side of the trolley tracks. Together, they explore the barnloft and discover the tormented ghost of Inez Dumaine, a little girl who died in 1861 on the Mississippi River. The rest of this wonderful novel is pure fun. Highly Recommended!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Alex Honda on May 4, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wanted to read Richard Peck's THE GHOST BELONGED TO ME because I heard this was the book that Disney based the TV movie--(Child of Glass [VHS]--on.

This book was fun to read and had a lot of scary (not too scary) moments in it as teenager Alexander Armsworth finds a ghost haunting his family's barn. The ghost, a girl his age but from a different time, tells him about a disaster that's about to happen and Alexander is able to save some town people from imminent death because of the warning. He becomes a mini-celebrity, which he doesn't like, and then he has to figure out how to help the ghost rest in peace. And he gets help along the way from his neighbor, Blossom Culp, who is like the poor man's Nancy Drew.

Anyway, the story is a little different from the movie (from what I remember) but it's enjoyable none-the-less. I really like how the story takes place in the early part of the 1900s, so no cell phones or computers or video games, and the characters talk with a southern drawl.

Fun and easy read about a different time and place, where kids can be kids.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Emily J. Morris VINE VOICE on July 30, 2008
Format: Paperback
My cousin loaned me this book when I was very young; however, I was unable to finish it before she needed it back. Finally, fourteen years later, I reread it. I am already a huge fan of Richard Peck and very familiar with the stories of the marvelous Blossom Culp--this book was just more proof how amazing an author Richard Peck is.

The setting is 1913, a small little town with not much going for it. Until one day, Alexander sees a ghost in his barn.

What follows is a delicious blend of a spooky story, a tale of small town life, and a comedy of epic proportions. Richard Peck is true to the classic ghost story feel, but his love for small town life is apparent.

The book is smartly written to portray the mind of a 13-year old boy, and the most minor of characters are made fascinating and quirky. Neither does Richard Peck play this book safe--it has its share of hells and damns and gruesome little details. Then again, it's all part of the charm.

Great Halloween book.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on August 31, 2005
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book, it's really a four and a half stars. I had read some of the other Blossom Culp books first, and enjoyed having Alexander as the narrator, although I think I prefer Blossom. I loved the setting. This was a funny, exiting, and somwhat spooky book. I recommend it to pratically anyone.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Patricia Tapia on June 27, 2008
Format: Paperback
I'm 37 yrs old and just recently rediscoverd this book at a used book store...I first read it when I was 12 and the movie too....The Child of Glass from Disney. I have to say it's one of the best from my childhood and enjoyed reading it again as a grown woman. I recommend it to all ages.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Christenson on October 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
I was very young when I saw the Disney movie, Child of Glass, and I was afraid of ghosts. However, years later, I took another look at the movie and decided to read the book. When I did, I saw things I didn't appreciate when I was young.

First of all, the movie was different from the original book because it was placed in modern times (at least, it was contemporary with the time it was made) and added the feature of the "child of glass" which didn't exist in the original book.

The book takes place in the early 1900s in a small town on the Mississippi River. Alexander Armsworth, a boy in his early teens, is approached by a girl from his class who tells him that the barn on his family's property is haunted and that Alexander himself has the ability to see the "Unseen." The girl, Blossom Culp, is a poor girl from a family of outcasts who has been known to tell tall tales, so Alexander isn't sure he believes her at first. However, he can't help but be curious, and when he sees a light coming from the barn at night decides to investigate. Inside, he finds the ghost of a young girl who warns him of danger on the trolley tracks near his house and tell him that he must act fast to save everyone. Frightened, Alexander gets the trolley to stop and learns that by doing so, he has saved the lives of everyone on board from a disaster at the bridge further on. Naturally, everyone wants to know how Alexander knew to warn them. When Alexander explains, he is met with skepticism from his social-climbing mother and sister and unwelcome attention from news people and curiosity-seekers from town. The ghost, who tells Alexander that her name is Inez Dumaine, is also in need of help before she can rest peacefully.
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