Best of the Alan Parsons Project, Vol. 2

June 10, 1988 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
3:50
30
2
3:38
30
3
4:24
30
4
4:27
30
5
4:12
30
6
4:40
30
7
6:01
30
8
3:26
30
9
4:08
30
10
6:34
30
11
3:22


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 17, 1987
  • Release Date: November 17, 1987
  • Label: Ariola
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:42
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138KKT4
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #74,809 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By mwreview on March 11, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Since this CD is volume 2 of the Best of... compilations, the big guns ("Eye in the Sky," "Time," "Games People Play") were already used on the first volume. There are still some excellent tracks here and some of the best tracks off the earlier albums that volume 1 missed. Vulture Culture, Steretomy, and Gaudi are later albums represented on this volume. The singles off Ammonia Avenue are here ("Prime Time" and "Don't Answer Me"). Unfortunately, "Prime Time" is slashed from a 5-minute track to less than 4. It just fades out without the cool, guitar-driven ending. Fan favorite "Days Are Numbers" (by far the best off Vulture Culture) is here and three glaring omissions from the 1983 released volume 1 are included: the instrumental "I Robot," "What Goes Up..." and "The Turn of a Friendly Card (Part III)," the latter definitely in my top 10 APP.
It is hard for me to complain about the hefty representation of Ammonia Avenue on these two volumes (one on volume 1 and three tracks here) because it is my favorite APP album. Only one track off of the brilliant Gaudi (Eric Woolfson's last with the band not including Freudiana and what many fans consider the last great APP album), however, is puzzling. "Standing on Higher Ground" is actually one of the weaker tracks on the album, most of which are amazing. Time constraints may have been one of the reasons, as most of the songs on Gaudi are over 5 minutes, and the stellar tracks are between 6-8 minutes. The Eye in the Sky logo is included on the cover artwork but, curiously, it is not represented. Those new to APP will probably find volume 1 more attractive because it has the more recognizable hits, but volume 2 has plenty to offer too, so don't pass it up unless you want to just go out and buy all their studio albums (an even better choice!). This CD includes song lyrics and liner notes but no photos.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Lonnie E. Holder HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 12, 2005
Format: Audio CD
As the 80s moved onward, the Alan Parsons Project did not, choosing instead to become a pop group rather than continue to be the experimental progressive group they once were. However, their descent into commercialism did not maintain their success, and the group's popularity among the masses waned in the latter half of the 1980s. With one or two exceptions, this collection is nearly all pop or mainstream rock rather than experimental or progressive. I prefer the Alan Parsons Project original albums, especially their early albums, and thus I prefer the first greatest hits over this collection, but pop fans will surely prefer this collection over the first collection.

The majority of this collection is from five 80s albums, with two tracks representing two 70s albums. Seven of the eleven songs charted. While this collection represents much of what was commercial about the Alan Parsons Project, the inclusion of four non-charting tracks allows some measure of validity to the claim "best of."

The #9 charting 1977 album "I, Robot" provides the vibrant instrumental by the same name. This layered track is filled with all sorts of electronic instrumentation and a beat that, like photons, seems to extend into infinity in both directions. Unfortunately for us this track is all too short. I strongly recommend purchasing the original album, particularly if you are a fan of 70s progressive rock.

The 1978 album "Pyramid," which charted at #26, yielded a minor hit with the #87 charting "What Goes Up..." This song reminds me vaguely of some of the music from "Jeff Wayne's War of the Worlds." The beat is generally ponderous with sparkling moments that provide the interest in this song that is very different from the 80s songs in this collection.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 18, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is a very good collection of the Project's later productions. Some tracks are well known: Don't Answer Me, and Prime Time for instance. All the songs on this album are classics. I think Stereotomy has to be the hardest rocker I've heard by the Project, and I like it. I heard 'I Robot' for the first time on this compilation, and it inspired me to try out all the other albums. I'll admit I'm hooked!
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Format: Audio CD
This second set of Alan Parsons Project's best should please Parsons fans, whether they prefer his progressive days or his eventual transformation to a more accessible pop sound. I've enjoyed Parsons in any style because I like his musical finesse. From his orchestral masterpieces to more standard albums like ON AIR and TRY ANYTHING ONCE, Parsons has always provided imaginative and polished musical confections.
This compilation has some great tunes like AMMONIA AVENUE, PRIME TIME, a shamefully short STEREOTOMY, TURN OF A FRIENDLY CARD and I ROBOT, perhaps his best instrumental recording.
This CD would hopefully entice you into trying more of the Parsons repertoire to appreciate the full spectrum of his genius.
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