Qty:1
  • List Price: $23.00
  • Save: $5.89 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Best American Comics 2010 (The Best American Series) Hardcover – September 28, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, September 28, 2010
$17.11
$1.01 $0.92


Frequently Bought Together

The Best American Comics 2010 (The Best American Series) + The Best American Comics 2011 + The Best American Comics 2008
Price for all three: $51.67

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1st edition (September 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547241771
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547241777
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.2 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #617,470 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This yearly anthology is always something to look forward to, with its impressive editors, juicy forewords, and superabundance of comics genius between its two covers. Series editors Jessica Abel and Matt Madden start off with a brief history of the burst in comics' popularity and readership over the past decade; luckily for us, they include an extensive list of "Notable Comics" that didn't make the final cut. Gaiman, in turn, agonizes entertainingly over the accuracy of the title Best American Comics and finally suggests that the volume instead be called A Sampler: Some Really Good Comics, Including Extracts from Longer Stories We Thought Could Stand on Their Own. It's a wealth of fine storytelling: extracts from Lagoon, the gorgeously strange fairy tale by Lili Carré; Carol Tyler's great You'll Never Know; Bryan Lee O'Malley's Scott Pilgrim vs. the Universe; and Fred Chao's Johnny Hiro. Some stand-alone gems include Todd Brower and Steve MacIsaac's "Ex Communication," in which two bearish men meet for a drink and chat uncomfortably about what they've been up to since their split; Peter Kuper's two-page takedown of the Bush legacy in "Ceci n'est pas un comic"; and Gabrielle Bell's "Mixed Up Files." A thrilling and varied journey from start to finish.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

For this fifth iteration of The Best American Comics, series editors Jessica Abel and Matt Madden made the initial selection, then gave the final say to this year’s guest editor, Neil Gaiman, who banked several lifetimes’ worth of comics cred for his seminal Sandman, among others. Many of the 25 pieces are graphic-novel excerpts, and as Abel and Madden attest in the introduction, “they are all focused on the narrative.” Which isn’t to say that there isn’t some outstanding cartooning going on here, from formalist tinkerers like Chris Ware and David Mazzucchelli to the always-entertaining Gilbert Hernandez (abetted by brother Mario) to a chunk from Robert Crumb’s artistically triumphant Book of Genesis. In addition to such annual usual suspects and newcomers as Josh Neufeld (with an excerpt from his terrific A.D.: New Orleans after the Deluge), fan favorite Bryan Lee O’Malley shows up at last, albeit in a curiously flat selection from Scott Pilgrim vs. The Universe. As always, the expanded selection list is a great place to find even more top-notch comics. --Ian Chipman

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Asterios Polyp is one book I HIGHLY recommend picking up.
E. David Swan
You might learn a lot about what's out there and what you'd like to read more of from looking through this, but you won't get an actual full story.
T. S.
Hence, for the most part, both the art and the scripts can't have massive appeal even if they aspired to it, which pretty much all clearly don't.
Jazz It Up Baby

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Poogy on November 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Tastes differ, of course, but it surprised and disappointed me how few of the selections in this collection interested me. I have the 2006 volume, and enjoyed most of it, and a few were very memorable (such as Justin Hall's La Rubia Loca). This one, not so much. Lots of material that seems strained, amateurish, sophomoric, or faux "edgy," or just falls flat, requiring more effort than it's worth. The volume gave me the depressing feeling that the genre has been exhausted and folks are just either recycling similar themes or are trying too hard to come up with something clever. I don't believe that's true--there's plenty of good material being created every year--but not much of it's in here. Maybe that's the difference between having Harvey Pekar and Neil Gaiman choosing the material. Better luck next year.

A few specifics: Citizen Rex by the Hernandez brothers seemed pointless. Omega the Unknown was unintelligible as well as poorly drawn. The Bank was in the classic style, but might have seemed more amusing had I read it twenty-five years ago, during the time it portrayed. On the other hand, the selection from The Lagoon was original and engrossing, and made me want to read the rest of the story, Asterios Polyp was well done, and The Alcoholic was classic. All of this is relative, of course; these are all talented artists. As a "best of" collection, though, it's weak.

(And by the way, for those who get indignant that there aren't superhero comics in these collections, like The Hulk or Spiderman, there aren't any in this one, either, and I doubt we'll be seeing them in any of this series. It's a completely different market. One reviewer suggested that Omega the Unknown was a superhero comic. No, it's really not. If anything, it's a parody of one.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By ChibiNeko TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover
One thing is absolutely certain. Comics are more than just ink & paper, a source of superheroes & villains, or a way to amuse children. Comics can appeal to all audiences & contain all sorts of plotlines, from funny to sad to the strange. In the 2010 collection of the Best American Comics anthology, we get to see 25 comics (some of which come from larger works) that run almost the full gamut of reader emotions.

The comics collected in this volume range from the truly bizarre The Night of Your life to the Hurricane Katrina comic A.D.: New Orleans after the Deluge. Along with these comics there are also ones that have gained quite a bit of widespread media attention, such as the excerpts from Crumb's The Book of Genesis & O'Malley's Scott Pilgrim vs. The Universe. There is truly something here for just about every audience.

Rather than list each comic, I'm going to highlight a few of the ones that I personally liked the most. All of the comics were incredibly well done & Gaiman (the celebrity editor for the book) did a fine job of collecting & organizing the set- it is just that listing them all would take up too much space.

My two favorites of the book had to be Asterios Polyp & The Night of Your Life, with A.D. coming up as a close third. The Asterios Polyp excerpt had such a wonderfully fun art style that allowed artist Mazzucchelli to shift from humorous to lighthearted to sadder scenes. He isn't nailed down to any one specific style- I was pleased to see that just as each character had their own personality, the art styles also differed.

The Night of Your Life was another of my favorites. In it the artist Reklaw illustrates various different dreams, each with their own surreal stories.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By T. S. VINE VOICE on December 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a neat book to read in the bathroom or while standing around in the bookstore, but it's not something I'd advise actually buying. It's a great showcase of interesting, inventive, intelligent comics, but at best it's the equivalent of a collection of great chapters from essentially unrelated books. You might learn a lot about what's out there and what you'd like to read more of from looking through this, but you won't get an actual full story.

So, yeah. I recommend finding this in the bookstore, flipping through it for a half-hour, then going and actually buying full copies of the comics that catch your interest. Something from here will -- the collected comics are brilliant -- but it's probably better though of as a reference or guidebook to what's out there than as a collection of completed works.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Trevor Burnham VINE VOICE on January 3, 2011
Format: Hardcover
In principle, Neil Gaiman should be the perfect editor for a collection of comics with broad appeal. His works, from Sandman on, have been splendidly imaginative mixtures of dramatic mythology and rollicking adventure. So it's surprising that this collection turned out to be, well, rather stuffy.

These are, alas, "art comics"--precocious, pretentious, too-clever-by-half, and not much fun. Of course, that's a gross generalization--with 25 different works spanning 300 pages, there's certainly stuff of worth here. Still, my reaction to most of it was a resounding "meh."

I found three unexpected gems: Jesse Reklaw's amusing adaptations of dreams (from The Night of Your Life); Fred Chao's rollicking "Lobster Run" (from Johnny Hiro); Theo Ellsworth's hilarious "Norman Eight's Left Arm" (from Sleeper Car).

The Asterios Polyp excerpt could have been shortened, but it does encompass the best sequence in the book. The Scott Pilgrim vs The Universe excerpt doesn't really work on its own; I highly recommend reading that dazzling series from start to finish.

And now, some gripes and unsolicited suggestions:

Two political cartoons were included Peter Kuper's tired anti-Bush rant "Ceci N'est Pas une Comic," and Peter Bagge's mildly pleasing "The War on Fornication.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?