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300 Best Jobs Without a Four-Year Degree (Best Jobs) Paperback – February 1, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-1593572426 ISBN-10: 1593572425 Edition: 2nd

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--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 460 pages
  • Publisher: JIST Works; 2 edition (February 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593572425
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593572426
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 7.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,798,089 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Direct and not too complex." -- Jim Hartle, Employment Couselor, WorkOne East

"Powerful, well thought out, great information." -- Allen Ceravolo, Los Angeles Mission's Urban Training Institute, Los Angeles

About the Author

Michael Farr has been teaching, writing, and developing his job search techniques for over 20 years. He has written dozens of books that have sold over 2 million copies. Mike emphasizes practical, results-oriented methods that have been proven to reduce the time it takes to find a job. His commonsense advice has made his books the most widely used in job search programs.

Laurence Shatkin has 30 years in the career information field, presents and blogs on career issues, and is the author of many best-selling books. Dr. Shatkin is sought after by the media for his expertise on occupations and appears regularly on national news programs. He has appeared on CBS Evening News with Katie Couric, the Fox Business Network, ABC News Now, CBS Newspath, NPR, and in many other TV and radio shows. He has been quoted in The Washington Post, The Chicago Tribune, Associated Press, Men's Health, Forbes, and many other major publications. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

63 of 75 people found the following review helpful By Angela Storace on August 14, 2006
Format: Paperback
There are several discrepancies in this book, starting with the title. The top job is an air traffic controller, making approx. $120K a year. Here's the problem: To become an air traffic controller, a person must enroll in an FAA-approved education program and pass a pre-employment test that measures his or her ability to learn the controller's duties. Exceptions are air traffic controllers with prior experience and military veterans. The pre-employment test is currently offered only to students in the FAA Air Traffic Collegiate Training Initiative Program or the Minneapolis Community & Technical College, Air Traffic Control Training Program. The test is administered by computer and takes about 8 hours to complete. To take the test, an applicant must apply under an open advertisement for air traffic control positions and be chosen to take the examination. When there are many more applicants than available positions, applicants are selected to take the test through random selection. In addition to the pre-employment test, applicants must have 3 years of full-time work experience, have completed a full 4 years of college, or a combination of both. In combining education and experience, 1 year of undergraduate study--30 semester or 45 quarter hours--is equivalent to 9 months of work experience. Certain kinds of aviation experience also may be substituted for these requirements.

That to me says I need a degree! Several other jobs listed in the book are also "mis-informing".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Helen Thomas on August 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought this to help a teenager get an idea on what's out there. The book is organized and helps to understand jobs out there to consider...thanks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By apptech on December 31, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
helps you with knowledge of what fields are hiring, what the pay range is, what jobs are hiring seniors, women and other demographic groups without needing a 4 year degree. A very good book for someone thinking of retraining in a certified program at a community college or tech college.
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11 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Virginia Allain on February 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
For those who aren't ready to tackle four years of college, there are still some good jobs out there. In 496 pages, this gives the details on the top 300 jobs that don't require that degree. The top paying one is air traffic controller which pays on the average $102,030 a year.
This is a good resource for anyone trying to decide on a career. Another resource is the Occupational Outlook Handbook, which is available in the reference section of most public libraries.
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