Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Best of Signal: Hitler's Wartime Picture Magazine Hardcover – 1976

ISBN-13: 978-0138100513 ISBN-10: 0138100519 Edition: 1st U.S.

14 New from $10.40 82 Used from $0.01 6 Collectible from $12.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$10.40 $0.01
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Prentice-Hall; 1st U.S. edition (1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0138100519
  • ISBN-13: 978-0138100513
  • Product Dimensions: 11.8 x 8.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #944,895 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A reader on April 1, 2000
Format: Hardcover
During the Second World War, each country had it's propaganda machine running in high gear. The purpose of which was to de-Humanize the enemy while reminding everyone of the good things about their own country. The United States had "Look" and "Life" magazines. The Germans had "Signal".
This book, and the others in this series of collections of Signal magazine articles, is an idealized view into the picture of German life painted by the ministers of propaganda. No serious collection of World War Two literature would be complete without at least some of the excellent S.L. Mayer books. I was so impressed with the books, I have donated two to the college library where I teach.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By J. Michael on April 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This fascinating book features a selection of articles from Nazi Germany's version of Life magazine. What's especially interesting about it is that among the 20 languages into which the magazine was translated, the articles included here were actually published in English and marketed to an English speaking readership in the United States, Ireland and the occupied Channel Islands. We're used to thinking of Nazi propaganda as consisting solely of angry men in uniforms orating wildly in front of stadia full of fanatics, but that misconception is belied by Signal magazine, which is slick, subtle, convincing and rather a fun read.

Anyone who has seen American propaganda from WWII ("wait a minute! Our government doesn't practice propaganda, do they?") can understand the style of Signal. Besides the fact that its editorial tone favors the Third Reich, the only differences are that it's less crude, contains a bit more in-depth politics and doesn't feature film stars as prominently. Otherwise, one could just as well be reading Life or some other glossy photo journal of the time. Its appeal centered around its vivid and dramatic photos. Whatever one's politics, it's hard not to be entranced by the pictures. Although the scenic shots are impressive, such as the German troops marching through the Arc de Triomphe or the Lutwaffe flying over the Acropolis, the magazine really succeeds with its miniature portraits: the jolly SS recruits from Scandinavia, the German soldiers hobnobbing with Parisian civilians, the gritty Afrika Korps troops coping with the hardships of the desert (so redolent of current Iraq War iconography), the sympathetic depictions of the British POWs.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John G. Hilliard on April 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I found this book very interesting from the point of view of this is what the German solder was reading and it helps to understand some of what they must have felt like going from being on top of the world to fighting to keep numerous armies out of their home land. What is interesting to do is to look through a volume such as this and then compare it to similar UK or US volumes; you will find many of the same topics and themes just with different titles. If you can find a copy I would suggest picking it up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Roger J. Buffington TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This book contains excerpts from "Signal" magazine. I originally picked up my copy of this book at the US Army bookstore in Frankfurt, Germany back in the 1970s. "Signal" was a magazine published by the Nazi government in Germany and all of the occupied territories of the German Reich during the Second World War. Signal was formatted in a very similar fashion to Life Magazine, and was intended to speak both to the Germans themselves (and especially the troops) but also to other Europeans. This magazine was very advanced for its day and the Germans put a lot of money and effort into publishing a slick, readable propaganda magazine. The name "Signal" was chosen because this word has a similar meaning in numerous European languages. Reading this book, which has excerpts from various articles that appeared in Signal during the war, the reader is reminded that Nazi ideology preached the idea of a "New Europe" that would include everyone that the Nazis did not intend to exterminate. The magazine usually stayed away from the rabid antisemitism and overt racism that really characterized the Nazis, but at times the mask slips and the reader is reminded of the true nature of Nazi ideology.

This book provides an interesting insight as to how the Nazis wanted to be seen by others and is well worth reading. RJB.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By James J. Varela on October 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Signal Magazine was the German " Stars and Stripes ". This book is made up of Signal articles that show the war from the Nazi perspective. It is amazing how Joseph Goebbels propaganda machine was able to portray the Invasions of neighboring countries as a liberation for a new Europe.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again