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Comment: Copyright 1984, softcover, 189 pages. All pages are clean.
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The Best Things in Life Paperback – July 12, 1984


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 190 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Books; As stated, 1st edition dated May 1977 edition (July 12, 1984)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0877849226
  • ISBN-13: 978-0877849223
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #22,508 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Kreeft has succeeded admirably in his revival of Socrates. . . . Kreeft's Socrates [is] recognizably the gadfly moralist, irreverent and reverent about just the right things." (The Reformed Journal)

"Any reader sitting down to persue these dialogues . . . [will] find himself roused, amused, entertained and instructed. Peter Kreeft does what all great teachers do: he returns us, again and again and again, to what T. S. Eliot called 'the permanent things.' " (Thomas Howard)

About the Author

Peter J. Kreeft (Ph.D., Fordham University) is professor of philosophy at Boston College where he has taught since 1965. A popular lecturer, he has also taught at many other colleges, seminaries and educational institutions in the eastern United States. Kreeft has written more than fifty books, including The Best Things in Life, The Journey, How to Win the Culture War and, with Ronald Tacelli, Handbook of Christian Apologetics.

More About the Author


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--- NEW! -- Charisms: Visions, Tongues, Healing, etc. (feat. Dave Nevins)

---"Beauty" -- The branch of philosophy dealing with aesthetics.
---"C. S. Lewis and Mere Christianity" -- C.S. Lewis' masterpiece
---"Christianity in Lord of the Rings" -- The cleverly disguised role of God
---"Culture War" -- A call to arms, mapping key enemies and battlefields
---"Existence of God" -- A magnificent overview of the arguments
---"Good, True, Beautiful" -- C.S. Lewis on three great transcendentals
---"Happiness" -- How do you get it? Christ's version vs. the world's
---"Heaven" -- The heart's deepest longing
---"Hollywood Screenwriting" -- Encouragement to film's creative storytellers
---"If Einstein Had Been a Surfer" -- Rediscovering intuitive thinking
---"Lord, Liar, or Lunatic" -- The famous argument for Christ's identity
---"Problem of Pain" -- C.S. Lewis's brilliant exposition on suffering and evil
---"Sex in Heaven" -- Imaging the fire of God's love
---"Sexual Reconnection" -- Healing the link between sex & love
---"Shocking Beauty" -- The live character of Christ
---
---

Lecture scheduling and more info:
http://www.peterkreeft.com



--

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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I was a full-fledged atheist!
KIllerShrew
I would recommend this book to everybody as a leisure read and deep read.
Bob
Most of us never live the best things in life.
@michaeldcarney

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Lisa C. Sharpe on November 12, 2000
Format: Paperback
I read this book because I teach logic and public policy debate to high school home schoolers. Peter Kreeft harpoons sacred cows, political correctness, philosophy and lazy thinking with humor and razor sharp logic. What a delight! Like all of Kreeft's work, this is not a quick read, but a trememndously valuable one. I'll be introduing this book during second semester. I am buying it for a high school student for Christmas, as well as a personal shelf copy.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Chu H. Choi on January 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
I read this book while taking a Socratic Dialogue Class with Dr. Kreeft at Boston College. "The Best Things in Life" is one of my favorite Kreeft books. It is a real page-turner, and poses simple yet perplexing philosophy throughout the dialogue. Kreeft's humor is a little corny, but his presentation of questions and conclusions are winning and convincing.
Highly recommended for young readers.
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27 of 27 people found the following review helpful By David Graham on April 6, 1998
Format: Paperback
What would happen if Socrates returned to the present, showing up on a college campus over 2,000 years later? What sorts of things would interest him and what would he think about the modern world? With fine imagination, Peter Kreeft explores these questions in a book that discusses issues pertinent to the modern reader's life. Entertaining and instructive, this book is good for stimulating ethical and moral reflection.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
This short, simple book carries a powerful punch. A real education is contained within: not mere factual information, but how to actually ask questions and think. I only wish someone had given me a copy when I was in high school, so I could have avoided needless, stupid mistakes.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By John DePoe on July 12, 2002
Format: Paperback
What is the meaning of life? Should I go to college? What kind of job do I want? - These are the kinds of questions Kreeft (via Socrates) presents to the reader in his book. The dialogs are short, witty, and make excellent points. This book proves that Kreeft is a master of common sense and philosophy. This book would be perfect for mature high school students and any college student (and beyond college too). Of course, the focus of the book is on a question we hardly stop to think about as we trudge through life: What are we living for? Using "means" and "ends" Aristotelian principles, he does an excellent job of bringing about awareness of the Summum Bonum. It is a short and easy read that will challenge the way most Americans live.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 17, 1997
Format: Paperback
With all the reams of paper devoted to the topic of "values" today, Peter Kreeft's, The Best Things in Life, is still a refreshing alternative thirteen years after it's first publication. Writing in the form of a play, the author places the ever-questioning Socrates in the 20th-century, and humorously debunks the popular pseudo-intellectual subjectivism and psycho-babble one usually hears these days. He not only entertains, but equips the reader to further examine values, ideas and his or her own life. In this book, as well as the others in his "Socratic dialog" set (The Unaborted Socrates, Socrates Meets Jesus, and Between Heaven and Hell), Kreeft also shows that Christians have brains and need not be ashamed to use them.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Corum Seth Smith on May 26, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As an aside, let me just say that reading the book recalled fond memories of my college and graduate school years, and even reminded me of some people I knew.

The premise of the book is contained in its title: What are "the best things in life?" The modern mind is exposed as one that is so introspective that it is oblivious to the workings of logic, reason, and basic self-understanding. Thus an irony is exposed, namely the inclination toward the self-delusional of the "me" generations.

Socrates' famous dictum: "the unexamined life isn't worth living," is the central tenet of the book. Two people closely evaluate their lives and realize that everything may not be as it seems.

The hopeful effect this will have on a reader is for he or she to turn and examine his or her own life. The book makes some interesting points, and is a "lighter" read than some of Kreeft's theological and philosophical treatises.

All in all, I like the book.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Kendal B. Hunter on March 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
Once again, Kreeft is able to imitate Socrates voice, and show us what the sage might have said had he been in contemporary society. Socrates' strength in not in the assertion, but in the cross-examination of ideas. Kreeft-Socrates, like Sřren Kierkegaard, does not come out with direct assertions, but you are bale to read between the lines and find out what they believe.
The device of using Socrates talking to two college students is great. Sadly, universities are not longer places of learning, but more of a regimented indoctrination corps. And intellectual corpses is what they produce.
This book should be read BEFORE someone goes to college, as a form of intellectual inoculation. The prepared mind is he conquering mind. In fact, I would suggest that high school freshmen should be required to read this book.
The only problem I have is in chapter 11, the discussion of capitalism and Marxism. Kreeft misunderstands Adam Smith's whole philosophy. He is not describing Adam Smith's philosophy, but a general "conventional wisdom" understanding of capitalism.
In fact, the very word "capitalism" betrays Kreeft's hidden assumption. The essence of Adam Smith's theory is not capital, but freedom. By virtue of its size, Russia/USSR has far more capital than the United Sates, but is far poorer. The only difference is the freedom. That is why there was a brain-drain in 1989.
On page 142, Kreeft mentions that freedom of thought is not confined to capitalism and that freedom of thought is not the defining factor of capitalism. This is dead wrong. You have the economy, but who makes the products and transactions that actually move the economy? A free human mind.
He also says that you can have freedom of thought without capitalism, and capitalism without freed of thought.
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