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Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill (Betsy-Tacy Book) Paperback – April 5, 2000


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Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill (Betsy-Tacy Book) + Betsy-Tacy and Tib (Betsy-Tacy Books) + Betsy-Tacy (Betsy-Tacy Books)
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 2 - 5
  • Lexile Measure: 640L (What's this?)
  • Series: Betsy-Tacy Book
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Reissue edition (April 5, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0064400999
  • ISBN-13: 978-0064400992
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #143,938 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Maud Hart Lovelace (1892-1980) based her Betsy-Tacy series on her own childhood. Her series still boasts legions of fans, many of whom are members of the Betsy-Tacy Society, a national organization based in Mankato, Minnesota.



In addition to illustrating the first four Betsy-Tacy books, Lois Lenski (1893-1974) was the 1946 Newberry Medal winning author of Strawberry Girl.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One  

Getting to Be Ten

Betsy, Tacy, and Tib were nine years old, and they were very anxious to be ten.

"You have two numbers in your age when you are ten. It's the beginning of growing up," Betsy would say.

Then the three of them felt solemn and important and pleased. They could hardly wait for their birthdays.

It was strange that Betsy and Tacy and Tib were in such a hurry to grow up, for they had so much fun being children. Betsy and Tacy lived on Hill Street which ran straight up into a green hill and stopped. The small yellow cottage where Betsy Ray lived was the last house on that side of the street, and the rambling white house opposite where Tacy Kelly lived was the last house on that side. They had the whole hill for a playground. And not Just that one green slope. There were hills all around them. Hills like a half-opened fan rose in the east behind Betsy's house. Beyond the town and across the river where the sun set there were more hills. The name of the town was Deep Valley.

Tib didn't live on Hill Street. To get to Tib's house from the place where Betsy and Tacy lived, you went one block down and one block over. (The second block was through a vacant lot.) But Tib lived near enough to come to play with Betsy and Tacy. She came every day.

"They certainly have fun, those three," Betsy's mother used to say to Betsy's father.

They did, too.

Betsy's big sister Julia played with Tacy's sister Katie, but they didn't have so much fun as Betsy and Tacy and Tib had. They were too grown-up. They were twelve.

Betsy's little sister Margaret, Tacy's younger brother Paul, and Tib's yellow-headed brothers, Freddie and Hobbie, had fun all right, but not so much fun as Betsy and Tacy and Tib had. They were too little.

Going on ten seemed to be exactly the right age for having fun. But just the same Betsy and Tacy and Tib wanted to be ten years old.

They were getting near it now. Betsy and Tacy were growing tall, so that their mothers were kept busy lengthening their dresses. Tib wasn't as tiny as she used to be, but she was still tiny. She still looked like a picture-book fairy. The three girls had cut their hair when they were eight years old and didn't know any better, but it had grown out. Tib's curls once more made a yellow fluff around her little face. Tacy had her long red ringlets and Betsy had her braids again.

"When I'm ten," said Betsy, "I'm going to cross my braids in back and tie them with ribbons."

"I'm going to tie my hair at my neck with a big blue bow," Tacy replied.

"We can't put it up in pugs quite yet, I suppose," Betsy said.

"But pretty soon we can," said Tacy. "On top of our heads."

Tib did not make plans like that. She never did.

"I only hope," she said, "that when I get to be ten years old people will stop taking me for a baby."

For people always thought that Tib was younger than she was. And she didn't like it a bit.

Tacy got to be ten first because her birthday came in January. They didn't have many birthday parties at Tacy's house. There were too many children in the family. Mrs. Kelly would have been giving birthday parties every month in the year, almost, if every child at the Kelly house had had a party every birthday. But when Tacy was ten, Betsy and Tib were invited to supper. There was a cake with candles on it.

Tacy didn't look any different or feel any different.

But she knew why that was. Betsy and Tib weren't ten yet.

"We'll all have to get to be ten before it really counts, I suppose," Tacy said.

Tib got to be ten next because her birthday came in March. Tib didn't have a birthday party; she had the grippe instead. But she was given a bicycle, and her mother sent pieces of birthday cake over to Betsy and Tacy.

And Tib didn't look any different or feel any different. But she didn't expect much change until Betsy got to be ten. And Betsy's birthday didn't come until April.

Tacy and Tib didn't say very much about being ten. They were too polite. They talked about presents and birthday cakes, but they didn't mention having two numbers in their age. They didn't talk about beginning to grow up until the afternoon before Betsy's birthday.

That afternoon after school they all went up on the Big Hill hunting for violets. It was one of those April days on which it seemed that summer had already come, although the ground was still muddy and brown. The sun was shining so warmly that Betsy, Tacy, and Tib pulled off their stocking caps and unbuttoned their coats. Birds in the bare trees were singing with all their might, and Betsy, Tacy, and Tib sang too as they climbed the Big Hill.

They sang to the tune of "Mine eyes have seen the glory," but they made up the words themselves:

"Oh, Betsy's ten tomorrow,
And then all of us are ten,
We will all grow up tomorrow,
We will all be ladies then..."


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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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I read these books as a child and reread them to this day.
BookClubGirl
For anyone who enjoys children's books or reading books to children, you should have fun with these.
readalot
Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is the third book in the timeless Betsy-Tacy-Tib series.
Erica Anderson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 19, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is my personal favorite of the Betsy-Tacy series (although picking a favorite is akin to naming your favorite child). It chronicles a pivotal year for Betsy, Tacy and Tib, when they finally have "two numbers in their age". Betsy prophesizes that their tenth year marks the beginning of great things for the trio, like falling in love and traveling the world.
Providentially, the handsome young Alphonso the Thirteenth is crowned King of Spain, giving the girls a convenient target for their first crush. While busily writing a love letter to their idol, the three stumble upon a colony of Syrian immigrants, who aren't always treated so well by their neighbors in Deep Valley. Betsy, Tacy and Tib proceed to make many new friends and learn a few lessons about prejudice and the American dream in the process.
MHL's gift for weaving together uplifting moral lessons with high-spirited adventure makes this a truly special book. She always somehow manages to get across a spiritual message without being heavy-handed, sentimental, or pedantic. Above all, her books are great fun and a pleasure to read.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 7, 1999
Format: Paperback
When Maud Hart Lovelace first wrote the "Betsy-Tacy" series, did she know how much so many people, from children to adults, would love them? The series has at least one book that anyone of any age can relate to. 10-year-olds will love "Over the big Hill," high-schoolers will love the books about when Betsy was attending Deep Valley High, etc. And it doesn't end there! Even if you're not the age that Betsy was in one of the books, you can still love all of them! Maud has a way of capturing real feelings and experiences--even bad ones--and turning them into works of art. The "Betsy-Tacy" series really is a work of art, even if it was painted with a pen, not a paintbrush.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Erica Anderson on June 12, 2006
Format: Paperback
Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is the third book in the timeless Betsy-Tacy-Tib series. In this latest chapter in the trio's childhood, the girls begin to develop with age and maturity. First the girls turned ten which is a big deal for them, especially for Betsy. They finally have two numbers for their age. The second big moment for the girls is they develop their very first crush on the newly annointed King of Spain named Alphonso. And the third pivotal moment in their young lives is when they meet a community of Syrians in Deep Valley who has not exactly been greeted warmly by its natives. It is so much fun watching the girls grow up in this series. The tone of Bets and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is slightly more somber yet realistic than the previous two books since it briefly touches on prejudice and unrequited first love. Even as an adult, I still like to pick up and re-read my Betsy-Tacy books for fun.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BookClubGirl on October 3, 2009
Format: Paperback
I read these books as a child and reread them to this day. The first four books, Betsy Tacy, Betsy Tacy and Tib, Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill, Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown are wonderful for a girl age 5 and up. The books progress in reading level as they go, as well as in themes. The final six books in the series, just reissued in 3 2-book volumes, are absolutely amazing. They are Heaven to Betsy/Betsy in Spite of Herself; Betsy was a Junior/Betsy and Joe; Betsy and the Great World/Betsy's Wedding and are great for a girl age 9 and up. We follow Betsy through four years of high school, with dances, rides in autos, boys and hijinks. Then she's off for a year of travel in Europe just prior to the outbreak of WWI and then she returns home to marry her high school sweetheart and begin on her writing career. Lovelace based these books on her own upbringing in Mankato, Minnesota and they are simply wonderful. This summer I traveled to Mankato for the Betsy Tacy Convention and saw Betsy's, Tacy's and Tib's house. I cannot wait to read these with my own daughter, but in the meantime, I will continue to reread them. They are my literary equivalent of comfort food. Fans of Betsy-Tacy include such bestselling authors as Meg Cabot, Laura Lippman, Anna Quindlen, Nora Ephron, Judy Blume, Nancy Pearl, Joyce Maynard, and Mary Kay Andrews!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bluerose's Heart VINE VOICE on December 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill read as one big story as opposed to the first two books, which seemed more like lots of little short stories. It wasn't as cute as the first two, but I guess that's to be expected. The girls are growing up and their stories are growing with them. I still enjoyed it, though, and I'm still looking forward to seeing how the girls grow up. While I still have the most in common with Tacy, I'm starting to relate more and more to Tib. I like how she seems a bit embarassed by some of the things Betsy and Tacy do. That reminds me of myself when I was younger.

I really looking forward to reading the rest of this series!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By readalot on October 24, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
These are well written books starting with young children and moving up in age to teenage and older. They take you from 5 year old girls up to marriage and all the adventures of those age groups. Written around the turn of the 20th century they reveal life at that time with its ups, downs and surprises. Though I am considerably older, I enjoyed reading these book which escaped me during my childhood. For anyone who enjoys children's books or reading books to children, you should have fun with these. I can hardly wait to finish the series.
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