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Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art Paperback – February 27, 2014

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Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art + Exhibiting Cinema in Contemporary Art (Amsterdam University Press - Film Culture in Transition) + Screen/Space: The projected image in contemporary art (Rethinking Art's Histories)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Between the Black Box and the White Cube rescues critically neglected and under-recognized work by artists who embraced media, especially film, at times and in contexts that proved inhospitable to intermedia art. Andrew Uroskie writes with a retrospective lens aimed at correcting the art historical past, but he also shows himself adept at treating the work of major contemporary figures. Bringing extraordinary care to his in-depth analyses and the development of his historical claims, Uroskie has produced a wide-ranging and insightful book that fills an important gap in the literature and will readily cross over from the realm of cinema studies to that of contemporary art history.”
(Bruce Jenkins, School of the Art Institute of Chicago)

“Through an array of insightful analyses, Uroskie places expanded cinema’s unruly practices within the very center of the discourse of post–World War II art and film. In so doing, he sheds important new light on figures both well-known (like Andy Warhol) and much-too-often ignored (such as Stan VanDerBeek, Robert Breer, Jean-Isidore Isou, and Ken Dewey) and outlines the prescient challenge they posed to the institutions that conditioned their exhibitions. Long marginalized, expanded cinema has finally received the critical attention for which it has always been clamoring.”
(Branden Joseph, Columbia University)

About the Author

Andrew V. Uroskie is associate professor and graduate director of the MA/PhD Graduate Program in Art History and Criticism at Stony Brook University, SUNY. He lives in Brooklyn, NY.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: University Of Chicago Press (February 27, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226842991
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226842998
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.9 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #949,714 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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In the closing pages of his fine book Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art, Andrew V. Uroskie delivers a vivid explication of Ken Dewey’s multimedia project Selma Last Year (1966). With this work, Dewey proposes to redefine the social character of media through sophisticated interrelations of technology and live performance contingent to a viewer’s presence: “the act of spectatorship itself [was] staged” (226). The stakes of this staging are evidenced in the work’s radical reconfiguration from its first to its second iteration. The work was initially conceived as an exhibition of photographs of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, which was a major media event of the Civil Rights Era. Dewey’s installation was presented on the one-year anniversary of the march in the First Unitarian Church in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago, imbuing it with a reverential poignancy. This sentiment would turn to pointed class critique in the work’s second formulation for the New York Film Festival at Lincoln Center, New York. “In contrast to the relatively diverse early audiences in Chicago,” Uroskie observes, “the audience at Lincoln Center would be disproportionately white and affluent. Dewey describes wanting to ‘break through’ the ‘self-satisfied nature’ of those largely insulated from the harsh reality of the civil rights struggle and rapidly becoming inured to its images of suffering” (219). In a new component to the work, viewers could watch an 8mm rear-projection continuous loop of violence committed by the police against civil rights activists in Selma on “Bloody Sunday.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Andrew Uroskie definitely has a grasp of his subject and is an important work for other scholars in the field of cinematic production and the social implications of cinema in our lives. It would be nice if the book were available in e-reader format, due to the automatic dictionary functions available with that format. I wore my dictionary out during the first few chapters looking up the abstract verbs and nouns. While I broadened my vocabulary, this book is not an easy read for non-scholars. It did bring back many memories of my own experiences as a member of the audience of the film industry over the last 60 years. Uroskie's insight amazed me.
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By Byoungsoo Kim on October 4, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
You have to read if you are interesting in contemporary art with cinema.
Showing new possibility of contemporary art history.
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