Between a Rock and a Hot Place: Why Fifty Is the New Fifty and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$11.39
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $3.60 (24%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Between a Rock and a Hot Place: Why Fifty Is the New Fifty Paperback – February 21, 2012


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.39
$1.89 $0.01
Showcase%20Weekly%20Deal

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 69%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


What If? by Randall Munroe
From the creator of the wildly popular webcomic xkcd, find hilarious and informative answers to important questions you probably never thought to ask. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Paperbacks; Reprint edition (February 21, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0061669288
  • ISBN-13: 978-0061669286
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,303,038 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The pop-culture mantra has it wrong: 50 isn�t the new 30, 50 is 50. And while today�s 50 may not look the same as one�s grandmother�s, one shouldn�t necessarily use a teenager as a role model either. Veteran screenwriter Jackson adopts a take-no-prisoners approach, with an Accept-o-Meter reading that tilts toward the kicking-and-screaming side. Forget your fountain of youth: today�s mature woman is more likely to need a battalion of specialists and a bucket of supplements just to keep up. Along with losses (career, libido) come undesirable gains (crow�s-feet, creaky knees), and�thanks to hormone-replacement therapy and Botox injections, spinning classes and Spanx bodywear, mammograms and colonoscopies�the rituals and rigors associated with aging manage to seem simultaneously counterintuitive and counterproductive. Glib, gossipy, and genuinely gutsy, Jackson�s take on this middle-aged milestone will have any woman who is 50, approaching 50, or waving bye-bye in the rear-view mirror wondering, Who is this woman and how did she get inside my head? --Carol Haggas --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

“Jackson covers it all . . . with humor and a firm hand. . . . The book is nothing less than what my own grandmother used to call a ‘godsend.’” (Susan Salter Reynolds, Los Angeles Times)

“Laugh-out-loud funny.” (O, The Oprah Magazine)

“Finally, there is a voice of reality to counter the claims of a youth-oriented culture and put forward the idea that successful aging isn’t about denying reality…. Jackson writes with the humor of Nora Ephron, the honesty of a fiftysomething, and the reality of medical science.” (Library Journal)

“A fiercely funny book about a most unfunny subject-aging.” (Erica Jong)

“Glib, gossipy, and genuinely gutsy, Jackson’s take on this middle-aged milestone will have any woman who is 50, approaching 50, or waving bye-bye in the rear-view mirror wondering, ‘Who is this woman and how did she get inside my head?’” (Booklist)

“The cure for fear is laughter, and this book offers a powerful antidote to all the scary aspects of aging. Jackson’s stunning candor and sparkling high spirits will have women of all ages laughing as they confront everything from menopause to wrinkles, thanks to this funny, practical and engaging book.” (Susan Cheever)

“Tracey Jackson confronts the speed bumps of life with wit, brilliant insights, and the kind of common sense that leaves you wondering, ‘Now, why didn’t I think of that?’ Between a Rock and a Hot Place is more than a good read, it’s good company.” (John Berendt)

“Between a Rock and a Hot Place is sexy, witty, energizing, smart, and full of terrific advice…. Run, do not walk, to get the book, and then call your nutritionist, your GYN, your health club, your nearest Whole Foods, your mothers and daughters, and tell them all about it.” (Judy Collins)

More About the Author

Tracey Jackson Biography


Tracey Jackson is a screenwriter who has written over fifteen feature films and fourteen television pilots, including The Other End of the Line, The Guru and Confessions of a Shopaholic.
Her recent documentary Lucky Ducks, nominated for Best Documentary at the MIAAC Film Festival in 2009, explores issues of parenting and adolescence, following Tracey and her teenage daughter from Park Avenue to Mumbai as they attempt to unravel the complex relationship boomer parents have with their over-indulged teens. Since the film's release, Jackson has been a featured guest on many parenting shows and websites, including MomLogic.com, Mary Talks Money with Mary Caraccioli, and ABC News with Annie Pleshette Murphy.
With the same candidness used to attack parenting in Lucky Ducks, Jackson now takes on aging with her first book, Between a Rock and a Hot Place. By telling themselves fifty is the new thirty, boomers have convinced each other they are getting younger--a myth which Jackson's new book seeks to debunk: "the truth is fifty ain't thirty no matter how you cook the books. It's fifty and it arrives with more baggage than Paris Hilton on a press tour."
While investigating her own life, Jackson, in Between a Rock and a Hot Place, takes us through the many twists and turns on the roller coaster of aging. She is not afraid to tackle the topics of sex, ageism in the workplace, death, health, empty nest, and everything else the years may bring. She makes us laugh hard and think hard as well, and offers ways to lighten the speed bumps along the way. "No one gives women a game plan for a hearty last thirty years," but with Between a Rock and a Hot Place, someone finally does.
Tracey is an avid blogger, whose blog Tracey Talks can be read on her website, TraceyJacksonOnline. She also contributes as a guest blogger to The Huffington Post, The Partnership for a Drug Free America's Decoder blog, and TinyBuddha.com.

Customer Reviews

I enjoyed this book: it was like having a conversation with a good friend.
Cindy Brock
Reading this book was like taking advice from that really loud friend that is embarrassing to you because she so honest and real.
Lavish Bookshelf
I love Tracey Jackson's hilarious outlook on life (and her honesty in this book).
Kathi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Pamela V VINE VOICE on December 31, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Between a Rock And a Hot Place, Why Fifty is not the New Thirty, is a memoir by comedy writer Tracey Jackson, a fifty-some year old Manhattan resident who was raised having most everything money could buy. Growing up in California, Ms. Jackson shares the bad diet & lifestyle of her elderly grandmother, who, in her fifties, sported a tightly-permed-&-gray hairdo, and wore baggy dresses to hide a frumpy figure created by years of eating sugary desserts.

Then Jackson describes her mother, who did just the opposite- jet-setting around the world in search of a fountain of youth and who, ultimately, signed up for an old-time face-lift.

(The author confesses she herself spent thousands of dollars on Botox injections and ultimately went under the knife to erase genetic imperfections and undo natural signs of aging.)

As someone of modest means and a budget, reading about the authors quest to find the perfect cosmetic surgeon started to grate on my nerves, because there are months I worry about paying the electric bill, and splurging the income I make being a nurse on temporary injections that could make my face less gaunt, is not going to happen anytime in my future.

But I continued to read the book. It held my interest. I read a chapter every night, and once, I even laughed out loud. (It was the chapter on Maddening Men.)

The book reads like a blog. It's the authors rants and feelings about everything from aged-dating to how it feels to be an empty-nester. I agree with most of what the author says, and in the end, admit that Tracey Jackson, while appearing to be pampered, spoiled and self-centered at times, also has a keen eye and tells a good story.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
67 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Niki Collins-queen, Author VINE VOICE on January 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Tracey Jackson's memoir "Between a Rock and a Hot Place: Why Fifty is NOT the New Thirty" is an appraisal of what middle age really means to her. Although I agree fifty is not thirty and appreciated her honesty, candor and humor I had difficulty relating to her life style, values and fears.
She admits to lousy money management and being a shopaholic. She says, "I don't have a nest egg and even a nest - more like some twigs scattered about, and even those usually end up turning into handbags." Being a big advocate of botox, eye lifts and bio-identical hormone replacement therapy she epitomizes the fears of a generation unwilling to relinquish its youth.
Jackson's statement that work adds years to your life and makes life more satisfying is true for some people but not all. My husband and I are in our 60s and love being retired. Jackson said she does not want to ever retire. She'll retire when she's dead.
I did enjoy Jackson's chapter on reinventing yourself by "arranging whatever pieces come your way."
She filmed a documentary titled "Lucky Duck" about her rebellious fifteen-year-old daughter spending three weeks at a slum school in Mumbai, India and Marin County Montana. Influenced by Madeline Levine's book "The Price of Privilege" that says privileged kids seemed to be the unhappiest Jackson hoped to show her daughter how lucky she was. She does not say if it helped her daughter but admits it showed her she could do other things and that a pay check and glossy sounding job did not define her.
Although much of her book is "do what I say not as I do" she does give some good advice - take care of yourself, keep active, learn new things, give back to others and remain realistic yet optimistic.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Hummingbirder TOP 1000 REVIEWER on January 1, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Veering from bawdy to maudlin, raunchy to schmaltzy, Tracey Jackson's over-50 confessional is like menopause itself. Up one minute and down the next, she traces her route from youth to semi-maturity with raw, intimate style proving beyond a shadow of a doubt that fifty really is not the new thirty. No stones left unturned, she talks about how her mind, body and career have changed and what she's done to deal with those changes.

This is no manual for surviving fifty, yet it is thought-provoking. It's a midlife memoir that could be written only by someone with dead ovaries. Old broads like me will love it. I haven't read anything this funny in ages. Delicate flowers should steer clear, lest they be offended.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Helena Wallace on April 12, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The only thing I didn't like about Jackson's book is that it wasn't written twenty years ago, when much of the wisdom it contains would have made a huge difference in my life. When you're in your twenties and thirties you can't imagine that you'll ever find yourself at a point in life where some things simply can't be changed, no matter what you do, who you know or who you are.

Few authors have addressed the issues that REALLY matter in such a brutally honest and effective way. Even fewer can do it with such humor! It makes it easier to swallow the stuff we simply don't want to hear - we're boomers, we're used to the world being our oyster; if we don't like something we've always been able to change it. Well, if you haven't made smart choices over the years - about money, men, health, career - at a certain point you can do a reasonable patch up job but can never really catch up - i.e. you WILL pay a price. This should be required reading for all young women!

Apart from its relevance and usefulness, the book is a great read. Jackson's funny, interesting, likable and her writing is tight, intelligent and entertaining. Some women have commented on how different her life is from the average Jane but I don't see how that matters. She writes with honesty, and humility, about matters significant to every woman. She genuinely cares about women taking charge and taking care and it shows. I've given copies to most of my girlfriends my age and all have loved it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews