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Between Saying and Doing: Towards an Analytic Pragmatism Paperback – June 6, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0199585540 ISBN-10: 0199585547

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199585547
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199585540
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #991,378 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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"Between Saying and Doing is an enriching, enlivening book. This is the work of a generous philosopher at the height of his powers stretching readers to the height of theirs."--Times Literary Supplement


About the Author

Robert Brandom is Distinguished Service Professor of Philosophy at the University of Pittsburgh, a fellow of the Center for the Philosophy of Science, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His interests centre on philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of logic. He has published more than 50 articles on these and related areas.

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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mark A. Povich on January 9, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The aim of these Locke Lectures is to develop a new conceptual apparatus in light of pragmatist and Wittgensteinian criticisms to traditional methods of analysis and show how this new method illuminates traditional philosophical problems. The traditional methods of philosophical analysis include, inter alia, reduction, supervenience, definition, and truthmaking, which are used to illuminate the relation between, for example, descriptive vocabulary and prescriptive or normative vocabulary ("Normative vocabulary supervenes on descriptive vocabulary" or "Normative vocabulary is reducible to descriptive vocabulary"). Here, Brandom develops a new method that he calls meaning-use analysis and illustrates its function using helpful meaning-use diagrams. When one vocabulary can be illuminated by another by meaning-use analysis, they stand in a "pragmatically mediated semantic relation" to each other. When one vocabulary is reducible to another, this means, roughly, that anything that can be said in one vocabulary can actually be said in the other. When one vocabulary stands in a pragmatically mediated semantic relation, in this case, the relation of being a "pragmatic metavocabulary," to another, this means that one can use one vocabulary to SAY what one needs to DO in order to correctly use the other vocabulary. For example, descriptive vocabulary could be a pragmatic metavocabulary of normative vocabulary or modal vocabulary: one can SAY in descriptive vocabulary what one must DO in order to count as correctly using normative or modal vocabulary.Read more ›
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3 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Nancy S. Struever on July 7, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It is good that Brandom counters Quine's dismissal of modality as issue.But his text is simply a claim to demonstrate-- by "algorithmic elaboration"!- that it is OK to use terms we have been employing for centuries to more or less good effect.
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