Customer Reviews

29
4.4 out of 5 stars
Beyer on Speed: New Strategies for Racetrack Betting
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$13.40 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on October 10, 2000
Reading Andrew Beyer is at once informative and entertaining, which anything on handicapping has no excuse not being. While his first book introduced speed figures, and his second mixed the application of them with an appreciation of other aspects of handicapping, this book revisits the holistic approach - always emphasizing speed figures - in an era when everyone has access to more information than ever, and many even know how to use it. What makes reading Beyer so fascinating is that one is made to see, vividly, the endless testing and working out of new ideas and approaches, in the stories - one might call them lessons - he recounts (the chapter on turf betting is a classic of sports writing). Beyer, like Bill James, is a scientist, and thinks like one, to the edification of all who choose not to keep recycling the same old bromides, and making the same old mistakes. People like Beyer and Steve Davidowitz are largely responsible for the ever-escalating arms race which parimutuel bettors are fighting amongst themselves. It's a wonderful game, but if you don't want to get left behind, better read this.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on November 11, 2001
I had had winning days at the racetrack before I read this book. I knew how to watch races, to look for troubled trips, to read the information in the Daily Racing Form, and to keep an eye out for sharp trainers and the patterns they employed with horses. I knew how to do just about everything but win.
After reading this book, I went to Hollywood Park on a Friday night and won. It didn't win because of some shocking new revelation, but because Andy Beyer stresses where the handicapper's attention should be, what information is crucially important and what is not. After reading this book, I felt as though I could see the way a race would take shape in my mind, who would go to the lead, who would go four wide on the far turn and make a move. Everything suddenly made sense. I have a lot to look forward to the next time I go to the racetrack, and most of the credit for that is because of this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on September 22, 1998
"Beyer On Speed" was the first American book I read on horserace betting. Many would consider the content irrelevant to British horseplayers, but the reverse is true. American racegoers have access to so much more material than their British counterparts, that those who care to avail themselves of the methods of those such as Beyer have a huge advantage in the quest for profit. Beyer himself refers to a "benighted era" of racing, where his speed figures were so little used that he could make money on blindly backing his top figure horse, an advantage which has all but been eroded in American Pari-mutuel wagering since the inclusion of Beyer speed figures in the Daily Racing Form. In addition to the information contained within, the book is written in pithy and perspicacious style. Beyer is a great anecdotalist; many of his stories are salutory as well as entertaining.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on September 9, 2011
This book should come with a warning that it's not intended for people just learning about betting on horses or even novices for the matter. Many of the concepts in the book are complex and could be used a study guide for a class in advanced handicapping. The best part of the book comes when Beyer shares highlights (very few) and lowlights (many) about a three-month handicapping trip in Australia. Beyer cleverly uses the trip as a primer for the importance of pace in handicapping. The encore for the book is Beyer sharing the success he had in Las Vegas on a simulcasting binge. Beyer's prose and writing style is both clear and clever. So enjoy!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on January 16, 1998
Beyer's book is entertaining and enlightening at once. The book gives the reader the theory behind speed handicapping and is full of examples, but even if you never cash a ticket, Beyer is so entertaining you won't care. He is not only a shrewd bettor, but a masterful storyteller. It's a great book, and not "stuffy" like some of the more conservative handicapping books we've all read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on March 21, 2005
Andrew Beyer is the godfather of speed figures in thoroughbred racing. In preparing to bet the Kentucky Derby and other races this year I read Andrew Beyer's fantastic book "Beyer on Speed" and Joe Cardello's book "Speed to Spare". These two books fundamentally changed the way I handicap races. It is simply careless to handicap races without understanding Beyer Speed Ratings and use them to your advantage. This book explains the origins of the Beyer Speed figures and walks you through an understanding of how the speed figures are calculated and how they work. I used the information on "Beyer on Speed" and "Speed to Spare" this year (March, 2005) to hit a big trifecta at Santa Anita - without Beyer Speed ratings and the information they provide, I would have never made the bet I made.

Andrew Beyer is not only a great author, but he is at the forefront of making a day at the races enjoyable to all. "Beyer on Speed" is a book that will absolutely make your trip to the track more enjoyable than you can imagine. Beyer doesn't sugar-coat the various elements that make handicapping a less-than-perfect science, but he does help you understand the fundamentals in a very concise way.

I appreciate Andrew Beyer's commitment to racing/handicapping that is so evident in this book and in all his other writings. Andrew Beyer remains at the forefront of the war against doping in racing and other honesty/integrity issues. Andrew Beyer is one of the reasons that horse racing is such a great sport. This book is for anyone wanting to know how to quickly understand the joys and pitfalls of handicapping - and why thorougbred racing is so much fun.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on May 18, 2007
This is not a "NEW" Beyer book. It was orginally published in 1993. The only "NEW" is a six page preface. If you have the original Beyer on Speed, you don't need to purchase this one.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on January 7, 2007
Shhhh.....don't tell anyone, but I'll give you a tip based on some recent observations; the early speed at Tampa Bay Downs is holding up in a number of races. I recently joked with someone while watching simulcast racing at Thistledown that Tampa Bay is Keeneland south (that is, before the synthetic track that was recently installed has taken most of the speed bias out of that Kentucky track).

But how can a handicapper - from a casual fan to a serious player - get an understanding on what runners - especially the ones who may have decent odds - in certain races have the type of pace to hold up from gate-to-wire, with you cashing a nice ticket & others tossing their tickets away?

Andrew Beyer takes the reader through the blueprint of effectively using speed figures as an effective betting strategy. He introduces such topics as pace, track bias and track conditions into the equation and provides a highly-readable plan that a handicapper can immediately utilize.

Since the 1995 reprint, the greatest change in Thoroughbred racing in the U.S. has been the introduction of synthetic racing surfaces that are replacing dirt tracks. The book is still a great resource - coupled with this unique variable - if the reader follows the action at these "new" tracks.

There are numerous books available to assist the handicapper, but Beyer On Speed has held up over the years due to its practical application of an important angle that can get lost in the shuffle of handicapper's "overload" when trying to figure out how to wager on a race.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on January 6, 2006
While probably not the best handicapping book even from the Beyer set, this is one of the more entertaining handicapping books around. You should read his earlier stuff first to see how he evolved as a handicapper to incorporate some ideas such as pace, trip, and form cycles, where earlier he had largely dismissed those. Where I spent a lot of time taking notes from other handicapping books, I spent more time turning pages and just enjoying a good read here.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 17, 2001
This book is not for the beginning handicapper, but has some of the best information in it of any handicapping book I have read. Most books just give you information about how smart they were to make certain picks, but little knowledge is given to the reader. Beyer tries to pass on information from many years as a professional handicapper. I wish he would write a handicapping book that would have racing forms for 4 or 5 days, then show you how they break down the races to make their selections, not with programs they want to sell. It would be interesting to see the steps a professional handicapper goes through to handicap all races for a track, if they would bet it or pass it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Picking Winners: A Horseplayer's Guide
Picking Winners: A Horseplayer's Guide by Andrew Beyer (Paperback - May 6, 1994)
$12.60

Betting on Horse Racing For Dummies
Betting on Horse Racing For Dummies by Richard Eng (Paperback - April 1, 2005)
$16.60

Ainslie's Complete Guide to Thoroughbred Racing
Ainslie's Complete Guide to Thoroughbred Racing by Tom Ainslie (Paperback - March 15, 1988)
$20.18
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.