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Beyond the Bonus March and GI Bill: How Veteran Politics Shaped the New Deal Era Hardcover – December 1, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0814762134 ISBN-10: 0814762131

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 268 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press (December 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814762131
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814762134
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 6.3 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,893,325 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Ortiz's book is an excellent contribution to a historical episode in need of political contextualization."-Jeremy M. Teigen,Political and Military Sociology

“Moving beyond other well documented examples of activism by former servicemen . . . Ortiz traces the fortunes of the two major U.S. veterans’ organizations, the first the patrician American Legion . . . the second the older, smaller and scrappier Veterans of Foreign Wars.”
-Times Literary Supplement

,

“Stimulating, clearly written, and meticulously documented.”
-The Journal of Military History

,

"Ortiz (Bowling Green State Univ.) has written an interesting account of a neglected component of politics during the New Deal era-- the impact of organized WWI veterans... This book will be required reading for anyone interested in the history of veteran politics and New Deal politics."-CHOICE,

“So much has been written about America in the 1930’s that it is hard to say anything new. But, mounting a vigorous argument, Ortiz demonstrates convincingly that scholars have neglected a very important development in this period. Thanks to him, historians will be compelled to rewrite their accounts of the age of Roosevelt.”
-William E. Leuchtenburg,author of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal: 1932-1940

About the Author

Stephen R. Ortiz is an associate professor of history at Binghamton University in New York.


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert A. Lynn on June 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
BEYOND THE BONUS MARCH AND GI BILL: HOW VETERAN POLITICS SHAPED THE NEW DEAL ERA
STEPHEN R. ORTIZ
NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2009
HARDCOVER, $47.00, 264 PAGES, NOTES, INDEX, PHOTOGRAPHS, ILLUSTRATIONS

In March, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt began the relief and recovery program of the New Deal. Remarkably, though, the second law signed by FDR, the "Bill To Maintain The Credit Of The United States Government," has been mostly forgotten. Better known as the Economy Act, the law led to a $460 million cut in veterans' benefits. This huge reduction triggered a strong political backlash by veterans against the New Deal. And leading this backlash was the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW). A drive for reductions in Federal spending began in the final months of President Herbert Hoover's administration. In November, 1932, Hoover proposed budget cuts of $500 million to $700 million to address the growing Federal budget deficits caused by the Great Depression. The Economy Act cut Federal spending by $243 million, not the $500 million requested by FDR. This aspect of the Act proved deflationary as the Federal government purchased fewer goods and services, and led to a worsening of the Great Depression. The Economy Act also gave FDR limited authority to re-organize executive branch agencies to achieve efficiency, but this power wasn't utilized much before the Act expired in 1935. By March 3, 1935, FDR had issued 27 re-organization orders, most of them minor in nature. FDR didn't engage in extensive re-organization efforts until the passage of the Reorganization Act of 1939 gave him that authority. Its most important provisions, however, repealed all Federal laws regarding veterans' benefits.
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