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Beyond the Cosmos: What Recent Discoveries in Astrophysics Reveal About the Glory and Love of God Paperback – February 1, 1999

4.1 out of 5 stars 75 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Ross (Creation and Time, NavPr., 1994) offers a variation on the argument proving the existence of God. He first examines the implications of the newest discoveries in quantum and particle physics that demonstrate the existence of more than four dimensions. Building also on Einstein's general and special theories of relativity, the author shows that science can not only point the way to the existence of the Creator but can also show that God is and has always been able to operate in all the universe's possible dimensions. Ross applies this extra-dimensionality of God to explain the apparent paradoxes of several theological doctrines (e.g., the Incarnation, the Trinity, free will and predestination, etc.). His blending of theology and science seeks to address the claim made by Paul Davies in his God and the New Physics (1984) that modern science provides a more convincing proof of God's existence than religion. But he weakens his argument by trying to interpret scripture in terms of science. A more successful response to this claim is found in Science, Technology and Religious Ideas (Univ. Pr. of America, 1994), which acknowledges the integrity of each methodology. Recommended only where there is demand.?Pius Murray, Holy Apostles Coll. & Seminary, Cromwell, Conn.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

HUGH ROSS earned his B.S. in physics from the University of British Columbia and his M.S. and Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of Toronto. He is the founder and president of Reasons to Believe, and hosts a television series by the same name which is broadcast internationally on TBN. A highly requested speaker on the topics of faith and science, Dr. Ross has appeared on numerous radio and television programs, including "CBS Television News," "Praise the Lord," "The 700 Club," and "Focus on the Family." He is the author of three other NavPress books: The Creator and the Cosmos, Creation and Time, and The Genesis Question. Dr. Ross and his family live in southern California.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 265 pages
  • Publisher: NavPress Publishing Group; Enlarged 2nd edition (February 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1576831124
  • ISBN-13: 978-1576831120
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,944,305 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
For all of those who feel that Ross didn't do a very good job in relating the concepts of higher physics and theology, it would help to remind yourselves that this book wasn't written for scientists with a PhD, it was written for the layperson. If it had been written for you high-brow types, in a manner to suit you, it would no longer be a book that the average person could enjoy. I just want you to know that I am not uneducated, I have a degree in the mathematical sciences.
Sure, sometimes the thread between the cosmos and some of the paradoxes of theology aren't completely answered by this book, but then theologians have been arguing these points for centuries. At least, Ross is attempting to pursue these questions in an original manner, from a cosmological and physics perspective. This is highly unusual, compared to the regular reading fare on this subject.
It isn't that I necessarily agree with everything in this book, Ross writes as a Calvinist and I'm of the Arminian persuasion (for you science types, this is Protestant history and theology that I'm talking here), but he did give me provocative things to consider. For instance, how could the death of one be an atonement for so many people? How many dimensions does God have? Is God really in an infinite dimension? Why are we "stuck" in a space-time dimension which is extremely limited and where we die?
Another book that helped to round out some of this was a book "Hyperspace" by Kaku. This is written for the layperson, but is written from a secular perspective (so some of its conclusions I didn't agree with, although it occupied only a small part of the book). However, it helped to fill in some of the "holes" to round out my reading for fun on this subject.
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Format: Hardcover
I read this book when it first came out, but it was only after the death of my youngest child, that it really had it's impact on me. Yes, my son is out there in a higher dimension, still with me in a way that he fully lives and I can only comprehend by way of the discoveries Ross reveals in this book
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By A Customer on December 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
The author presents esoteric topics with skill, and the non-cosmologist will have no trouble following. The book "puts some meat on" what has, for the most part been, "mathematical masturbation", namely string theory and more-than-4-dimensional-space. I have a multi-diciplinary Ph.D. in physics, electrical engineering and biology, and I found this book enlightening.
2 Comments 24 of 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book! Of particular interest was the discussion of the extra-dimensionality of God. It is worth the price of the book just to read the illustration about how challenging it is for a super-dimensional God to communicate with four-dimensional humans. Fascinating! I highly recommend this book.
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Format: Paperback
In "Beyond the Cosmos" Hugh Ross presents scientific findings that assist in explaining how certain Biblical statements and theology can be true. Ross gives no implication that the Bible is anything other than infallible, and he recognizes that science has not discovered all the answers. His attitude seems to be that because God created this universe, true scientific discoveries support that fact. As a Christian research chemist, I found the book enlightening, exciting, and encouraging.
2 Comments 26 of 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Paperback
Beyond the Cosmos
Hugh Ross' book "Beyond the Cosmos" pulls science together with Pauline Christianity to show how many classical religious stories make sense when explained using the fourth and higher dimensions. Mathematicians and scientists have actively used higher dimensions and fractional dimensions (fractals) since the 19th century. In the 20th century, relativity, superstrings, black holes, quantum dynamics, and gravity seem difficult to explain without assuming that the universe has more than four dimensions.
I found many parts of the book interesting, for example, the blurring of the infinite and the finite in Chapter 3, multiple time dimensions ("the Creator's capacities include at least two, perhaps more, time dimensions" and "... our time dimension had a beginning..."), and multiple space dimensions ("... God must be operating in a minimum of eleven dimensions...or the equivalent"). There may be a way to turn into higher dimensions (Figure 5.2). And the fires of hell may be a place where people "get what they want more than anything else: freedom from the will and rule of God." There is even an explanation of why the people in hell have to be tormented while they exercise that freedom.
The book fulfills its stated purpose and the flaws are only minor. It could be improved by discussing the effect of fractional dimensions, entropy, and dark matter in the universe. The book portrays the curious idea that there can be any freedom of will if a higher power (God, in this case) knows what we do. The book uses a particular vocabulary, referring to God as a personal being of masculine gender and employing translations of those verses of Scripture and of the Pauline writers that are accepted by its author.
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1 Comment 23 of 25 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover
While I found that the book only dealt with a few new ideas to me, they were ideas that stretched my imagination to a level that made me focus more on our eternal existance rather than on the mundane, ordinary muck of everyday living. I borrowed it from a friend, and now I find myself recommending it to my friends, and I haven't even got a copy for myself yet! It's not an easy read, but it is worthwhile, and I wish I had some kind of clout to ensure you read every page! Hang on...it's worth it!
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