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Beyond Exoticism: Western Music and the World (Refiguring American Music) Paperback – March 5, 2007


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Product Details

  • Series: Refiguring American Music
  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Duke University Press Books; annotated edition edition (March 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0822339684
  • ISBN-13: 978-0822339687
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.2 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,506,525 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A bold and wide-ranging study, from a musical angle, of ‘the West and the rest.’ Timothy D. Taylor mingles insights from musicology, cultural and social history, and cultural theory to demonstrate the changing ways in which various streams of musical life, in Europe and America, have responded to the wider world. Rameau, Mozart, Ives, and Ravel here stand cheek by jowl with Bill Laswell, bhangra, Hawaiian cowboy music, and TV ads, challenging—and reinvigorating—such easy labels as ‘exotic’ and ‘multicultural.’”—Ralph P. Locke, Professor of Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester


“In Beyond Exoticism, Timothy D. Taylor provides an articulate primer on so-named world music. In clear, jargon-free, and lively prose, he explains the impact of corporate capital organized through intricate global networks of production, dissemination, and consumption. His goal is to historicize musical otherness across a broad swath of time and place, beginning with European orientalist operas in the eighteenth century and ending with the fake exoticism of recent television adverts. Taylor relates a story of difference governed, above all, by varying and persistent efforts to render fungible the musics of the nonwhite world: He describes in detail the marketing of musical difference and the homogenization of sonoric otherness that commonly results. In brief, this is a story with serious stakes.”—Richard Leppert, author of The Sight of Sound: Music, Representation, and the History of the Body


“Ranging deftly from global pop to global musicology, Timothy D. Taylor launches a global challenge against the division of the world between the producers and consumers of the exotic, between self and other. In the course of carefully focused case studies formed along the borders of colonial and imperial encounter, history emerges with new narratives of difference, insistently including the disjuncture and dissonance unleashed when western music enters into aesthetic and political counterpoint with the world. Beyond Exoticism is a disquieting book that nonetheless serves as a call for renewed engagement with musics familiar and unfamiliar.”—Philip V. Bohlman, University of Chicago

From the Publisher

"Ranging deftly from global pop to global musicology, Timothy D. Taylor launches a global challenge against the division of the world between the producers and consumers of the exotic, between self and other. In the course of carefully focused case studies formed along the borders of colonial and imperial encounter, history emerges with new narratives of difference, insistently including the disjuncture and dissonance unleashed when western music enters into aesthetic and political counterpoint with the world. Beyond Exoticism is a disquieting book that nonetheless serves as a call for renewed engagement with musics familiar and unfamiliar."--Philip V. Bohlman, University of Chicago

"In Beyond Exoticism, Timothy D. Taylor provides an articulate primer on so-named world music. In clear, jargon-free, and lively prose, he explains the impact of corporate capital organized through intricate global networks of production, dissemination, and consumption. His goal is to historicize musical otherness across a broad swath of time and place, beginning with European orientalist operas in the eighteenth century and ending with the fake exoticism of recent television adverts. Taylor relates a story of difference governed, above all, by varying and persistent efforts to render fungible the musics of the nonwhite world: He describes in detail the marketing of musical difference and the homogenization of sonoric otherness that commonly results. In brief, this is a story with serious stakes."--Richard Leppert, author of The Sight of Sound: Music, Representation, and the History of the Body

"A bold and wide-ranging study, from a musical angle, of `the West and the rest.' Timothy D. Taylor mingles insights from musicology, cultural and social history, and cultural theory to demonstrate the changing ways in which various streams of musical life, in Europe and America, have responded to the wider world. Rameau, Mozart, Ives, and Ravel here stand cheek by jowl with Bill Laswell, bhangra, Hawaiian cowboy music, and TV ads, challenging--and reinvigorating--such easy labels as `exotic' and `multicultural.'"--Ralph P. Locke, Professor of Musicology, Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.


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Format: Paperback
His goal is actually quite simple: to "take a more ethnomusicological and anthropological approach to the study of music in history, to attempt to understand the deeper social, cultural, and historical underpinnings of musics and musical practices." More specifically, he looks at Western interactions with and appropriations of the Other through the above methodology, from roughly the Age of Exploration through the present. It isn't comprehensive but instead tends toward a case study approach.

Portions can make good supplemental readings in undergraduate courses, but it is probably more appropriate as a complete text in graduate courses. It's a nice foil to standard Western classical music histories, and it could work in period and methodology classes. The introduction eviscerates traditional musicology.

Opinion-wise, I loved it.
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