Buy New
$48.80
Qty:1
  • List Price: $55.00
  • Save: $6.20 (11%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Beyond the Last Village: A Journey Of Discovery In Asia's Forbidden Wilderness Paperback – April 17, 2003


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$48.80
$30.00 $5.35

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Clip this coupon to save 50% on this product when you buy from Amazon.com. Here's how (restrictions apply)

Frequently Bought Together

Beyond the Last Village: A Journey Of Discovery In Asia's Forbidden Wilderness + Life in the Valley of Death: The Fight to Save Tigers in a Land of Guns, Gold, and Greed
Price for both: $75.29

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Island Press; New edition edition (April 17, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1559638001
  • ISBN-13: 978-1559638005
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,056,994 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It feels like Conrad's Heart of Darkness in reverse, as he escapes the 'civilisation' of a brutal military regime to find peace and light in the farthest lands."
(The Guardian)


"...often reads like a dispatch not just from a distant place but from a distant time, a letter home from the Age of Discovery that was somehow delayed in transit for a couple of centuries."
(The New York Times Book Review)

About the Author

Alan Rabinowitz is Director of the Science and Exploration Program at the Wildlife Conservation Society based in the Bronx, New York. He is a frequent contributor to Natural History and is the author of two previous books: Jaguar (Island Press, 2000) and Chasing the Dragon's Tail (Doubleday, 1991).


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Margaret Knoebel on January 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this book. The way Mr. Rabinowitz intertwined his experiences in Myanamar with his own internal conflicts really personalized the story and captivated me as a reader. I also found his experiences with the Taron amazing - imagine seeing and interacting with the last of a group of humans before their extinction. One of the important ideas which I gained from this book is the idea that animals need to come first when a National Park is created. He showed what happens when the needs of the people living the area come first - extinction! At the same time he is careful to note that if the people living in the area are not given an alternative to their current way of life - no park will suceed. The world needs more Alan Rabinowitz's.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Enjolras TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 21, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is really an inspiring book. While some people debate whether any environmental work in Burma is worth it, Rabinowitz shows how through perseverance and dedication one can make a positive difference in Burma. I appreciate how open and honest he is. Rabinowitz does not emerge as a hero or saint (as some of his emotions may belie), but he does come across as an true and decent person.

I only wish he updated the book to include his more recent adventures in Burma.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Marceau Ratard on December 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
This was a good book, I think Jaguar was his best book but I liked this one. It must have been amazing to have trekked across such unknown wilderness and interact with the local villagers and see a part of the world that virtually no western eyes have seen. It must have been extremely difficult to deal with the reality of overexploitation of wildlife to trade for something as mundane as salt. Rabinowitz doesn't paint the local people as uncaring monsters. They are just trying to make a life for themselves and their families.
I would have like a few photographs of the animals, but this isn't a field guide. Overall the book was very good. I liked the way the Dr. Rabinowitz made the point that if any conservation effort is going to have even the smallest chance of being successful the local government and more importantly the local people need to be involved from day one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Donald E. Gilliland on March 10, 2012
Format: Paperback
In Beyond the Last Village Rabinowitz recounts his multiple trips to Myanmar in the mid to late 1990s, hoping to survey the country's many wildlife species, and also hoping to convince the government (yes, those notorious junta generals) that they needed to establish special zones, and even national parks, to protect those animals. Amazingly, he succeeded in getting all those things done, and also discovered some new species in the process. Call it dedication, perseverance, or just sheer luck, but Rabinowitz had it. Perhaps his style of negotiation, patience, and respect should be emulated by political leaders hoping to "engage" with the new leaders of Myanmar. Although trained as a scientist and researcher, Rabinowitz comes across as a natural explorer and modern adventurer in this book. And he's also a very good writer. Parts of this book are written so eloquently and are so moving that it literally brought tears to my eyes. Rabinowitz is passionate about his quest to save endangered wildlife, but he's also passionate about the villagers that he meets during his trips. It's the accounts of those human interactions that are some of this book's most memorable moments. This is a wonderful, inspiring book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images