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Beyond Roots II: If Anybody Ask You Who I Am (A Deeper Look at Blacks in the Bible) Paperback – February 1, 1994


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Paperback, February 1, 1994
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: Renaissance Productions (February 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0962560553
  • ISBN-13: 978-0962560552
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #981,027 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven H. Propp TOP 100 REVIEWER on July 6, 2011
At the time this book was published in 1994, Rev. William Dwight McKissic was Senior Pastor of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Arlington, Texas. He is also the author of Beyond Roots: In Search of Blacks in the Bible and Moving from Fear to Faith: One Family's Journey. Dr. Tony Evans was Senior Pastor of Oakcliff Bible Fellowship in Dallas, Texas, and has also written books such as Are Blacks Spiritually Inferior to Whites?: The Dispelling of an American Myth.

They wrote in the first chapter, "It is the intention of this work to exhibit Scripture and its supporting historical documentation as ammunion to give Blacks our rightful due as a strategic and intricate part in God's divine plan... This book is written to help Black people look beyond race and see the justice and righteousness of God, who shows partiality to no one (Acts 10:34)... This book is also written to help our White brothers and sisters understand how we view ourselves in biblical and church history to that they will not view us as 'Johnny Come Latelys' on the scene of Christian world history..."

Here are some additional quotations from the book:

"We consider (Arthur C.) Custance's (
...Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Clarence Traynham on January 7, 2013
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I am happy with the book Beyond Roots II: If Anybody Ask You Who I Am (A Deeper Look at Blacks
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 10, 2001
I think William McKissic goes out of his way not to offend anyone in this pampmhlet, rather than tell it like it is. I think in this day and age a person should feel compelled to tell the truth, rather than to have the truth swept under the carpet. One point that Mr McKisssic fails to make is that the Hebrews who were already a dark skinned race who intermarried with the Hamatic nations to become a blend of one race. There are numerous examples which show that this misgenation of the Hebrews took place. McKissic is also incorrect in saying that Shem, Ham and Japeth were of 3 distinct races. Many scholars feel that they were of the same race, however the areas in which they chose to settle brought on the need for melanin or the lack there of in Japeth's descendant's case. But one thing is certain, many Hebrews were mistaken for Hamatic people throughout the bible. Joseph is mistaken for an Egyptian in Genesis 42, and Paul is mistaken for an Egyptian by the Romans in Acts 21:38. Also McKissic fails to mentions the pictures of Yeshua (Jesus the Christ) which clearly shows that he was black, needless to say these pictures pre-dates the Eurpean image of Christ that was created during the 15th century by at least 1000 years. I think better research would have served McKissic well, rather than not trying to ruffle any feathers. This world has been living a lie for more than 500 years, thanks to European colonialism, it is time that we correct these myths. Mr McKissic work stops short of correcting these myths, and it makes me wonder, what or who he is afraid of. Slavery is over Mr McKissic you need not bow down to any man!
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 5, 2001
Some useful info. However, the book lacks scholarship; i.e., the book simply recites the dubious works of many Afrocentric "scholars". How is it possible to assert that three men born of same mother and father can be of different races, simply because the hue of their skins may have been different? They conjecture that the hues of Ham, Shem, and Japheth are black, dusky (olive) and fair (I suppose this means white) from their names; however, a review of concordances and lexicons hasn't yielded any support for their conjectured hues. If different hues imply different races, then most African American families include different races (probably even those of the authors). Wake up. Haven't you heard that race is a political construct. Race has no biological meaning, as was once purported in the late 19th century and the early 20th century.
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