Beyond The Black Rainbow 2012 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(118) IMDb 6/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

Held captive in a specialized medical facility, a young woman with unique abilities seeks a chance to escape her obsessed captor.

Starring:
Eva Allan, Scott Hylands
Runtime:
1 hour 50 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Beyond The Black Rainbow

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Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Thriller
Director Panos Cosmatos
Starring Eva Allan, Scott Hylands
Supporting actors Scott Hylands, Rondel Reynoldson, Marilyn Norry, Gerry South, Chris Gauthier, Sara Stockstad, Roy Campsall, Geoffrey Conder, Colombe Meighan, Ryley Zinger, Vincente Rodriguez Lima
Studio Magnolia Pictures
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

I had to stop it after only 18 minutes.
Fish Kungfu
Buckarro Banzi is on of the 1980s more bizarre and odd films to have come out, an odd amalgam of studio authorization of a very bizarre story.
Carbonadam
It really just seemed like you were watching someone have a bad acid trip.
Nemo Navarro

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

70 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Carbonadam VINE VOICE on September 12, 2012
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Just because most of the films you watch have easily discernible plots does not mean that films presented otherwise are poorly made. Think of Beyond the Black Rainbow as poetry, not as a novel. If you need a clear explanation stay away from this film. You'll hate it. If you can enjoy the bizarre, wild mood, and viscerally gorgeous photographic visuals then stick around. If you enjoy films where everything is not spelled out for you then this too might be a sign that Beyond the Black Rainbow is for you. Think of it as the privilege of entering someone else's dream.

In the vein of Land of the Lost, Space 1999, Liquid Sky, Altered States, Coma, Looker, THX1138, Scanners, 2001, and filmmakers like Kubrick, David Cronenberg, Stan Brakhage, Kenneth Anger and dozens of other films and filmmakers I know and don't know from the 70s and 80s comes Beyond the Black Rainbow. It is a fever dream of a film that is more experience than linear narrative. Imagine a B film from the 1980s was lost and never seen. Beyond the Black Rainbow is supposed to be that lost film. It's here as if from a time machine. The film is a homage to low budget gems from the past; something only seen in some off the beaten path theater away from civilization.

Now despite all reports to the contrary there is some semblance of a narrative here. Remember though that what follows is my interpretation of what I saw. The film is open ended enough to serve yours too. The film is carefully and skillfully constructed so I assume if he wanted things explained more, he would have simply done that. Like the famous Kubrick/Lovecraft quote: "In all things mysterious - never explain.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Joe Smart on February 22, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
A young woman is trapped in a room in a lab, being observed and experimented on. A sinister doctor talks to her through the glass every day but she never responds or even looks at him. The neon-coated visuals, synth soundtrack and antique computer monitor displays are all meant to give the impression that this is a movie made in the early 1980's, a fact further reinforced by a scene in which Ronald Reagan makes an appearance on a television screen. Beyond the Black Rainbow looks and sounds great--one just wishes that it was more than an empty-headed exercise in style. In terms of story virtually nothing happens. You never find out much of anything about either of the main characters and there's no suspense or twists or action or anything--just those pretty visuals and a soundtrack that John Carpenter probably would have been pleased with. This is worth a look but it could have been a whole lot better..
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24 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Gorgatron on October 4, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video
I will warn you right up front: if someone tells you this film is similar to Kubrick, they are wrong... or at least not scholars of Sci-Fi. This is much much closer to Tarkovsky (a director who makes Kubrick look introductory with regards to cinema).

The story starts out slowly, it never really explains what exactly has happened (ala Tarkovsky's Stalker or the middle period works of Jodorowsky), which is precisely how things should be done.

Adding to the atmosphere as the film builds, is the excellent soundtrack by Black Mountain's keyboard player/organist Jeremy Schmidt, who really adds to that whole retro vibe.

More than anything, I'm hoping that this film is a sign of a return to the weird/boundary pushing science fiction of the 70s. It recalls the era of Tarkovsky's hey day, The Holy Mountain, Black Moon, countless other films that are incredible, insular, and lush.

If none of this scares you, it is well worth your time. Honestly? It's nowhere near as long and "shot perfect" as Tarkovsky or Kurosawa or late period Bergman, but it certainly aspires to those heights.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Kober on October 2, 2012
Format: DVD
Though he may not be a household name, I've enjoyed much of director George P. Cosmatos' work, including Rambo: First Blood Part II, Cobra, Leviathan, Tombstone and the underrated Of Unknown Origin, wherein Peter Weller goes nuts and destroys his home in an attempt to kill a rodent of particular nuisance. His better-known films may have never risen above entertaining popcorn-fare, but it's clear he had an economy of style and the ability to push forward a cohesive narrative. George passed away in 2005, but the "film gene" passed to his son Panos Cosmatos, whom has presented us with his debut feature, "Beyond the Black Rainbow," a film that could not be further from the style and presentation of his father, which, in this case, is meant as a compliment and not a criticism.

The plot is minimalist at best, centering on a mostly mute young girl named Elena (Eva Allen, at times resembling a cleaned up version of the albino Grudge ghost), who possesses psychic powers, and her experiences in the Arboria Institute, a quasi-high-tech establishment that promises to unlock the pathway to happiness via "alternative" practices. Monitoring her progress is Dr. Barry Nile, portrayed with slithery aplomb courtesy of Michael Rodgers, looking like an underfed and over-the-hill Christian Bale. The film follows mostly just these two characters, Nile generally tormenting Elena in different ways to gauge her abilities as he himself spirals into various crevasses of derangement. Eventually, Elena begins to seek a way out of the institute and away from Nile's' abuses. And that pretty much takes up the crux of the runtime.
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