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18
votes
It doesn't technically make espresso, because it can't build that many bars of pressure. It basically makes something sort of between espresso and coffee, so it's kinda like a strong coffee (hence the term 'moka'). I wrote a lengthy review on this product that includes instructions and tips, but here are some highlights: What I have found to be the best way, and also what Bialetti's website recommends, is to grind your coffee a step above espresso grind (so the lower end of fine drip) and then put it on the stove at LOW heat with the lid open. That takes about 11 minutes for me, so I set a timer for ten minutes so I am sure to be back in my kitchen in time (because once it starts brewing, it brews quickly and you want to remove it from the stove in time so the gasket doesn't burn). If it takes more than 13 minutes to brew on low heat, then your grind is likely too fine and it's having trouble building enough pressure to percolate (and it will probably taste a little burnt). If it takes 7-10 minutes on low heat, your grind is not fine enough. Do leave the lid open during brewing, both so you can see when the coffee brews and to avoid it burning. Don't use high heat, because you will very likely burn your coffee and the percolation spout (I call it a coffee volcano) could spew coffee outside of the pot and onto your stove. The handle should not be getting hot during brewing. I like to use an organic medium roast coffee bean. I've brewed some good coffee with dark beans as well, but mokapot coffee is so strong to start with that I find darker roasts are a little to rich for me.
Apr 8, 2014 by snowdrop
10
votes
I must be addicted to good, strong coffee. I use the 6 cup and it's enough for a good sized cup of coffee with creamer. I live in Italy and the Italians are amazed that I drink this much coffee in the morning - amateurs.
Apr 13, 2014 by RWS
7
votes
I don't have a tried and true answer for you because I have not had a problem. But here are a couple of suggestions to try. Make sure you let it cool down before trying to dump it. Make sure to take it all apart (including the rubber gasket) and cleaning really good at least once a week or maybe more. Make sure you don't put more coffee in than you are supposed too. Make sure it's the right grind of coffee and not espresso grind. Hope you get the problem figured out.
Feb 15, 2014 by Judith Berry
6
votes
Danielle--I have the smallest size Bialetti, but the coffee is so easy to make and tastes great! My electric stove is a flat-top, and I just make sure the handle is off to the side a bit. I have had no trouble with the handle getting hot and pick it up right from the burner with the handle. Turn the burner to about medium heat, and within a few minutes the coffee starts to bubble out of the spout inside the top half of the coffee maker. It only takes a minute or so from this point, so watch it a bit, then when the top half is full, remove it from the heat. I even heat the milk on the same burner in a stainless steel Turkish coffee pot/pan thing (Pradeep brand) I got at an Indian market. Both fit just fine. Also, I saw a video on Youtube about making Cuban coffee. Put sugar into your mug, then put a few drops of the just-brewed coffee on top, and stir it for a minute or two until it looks like a paste. Pour the hot milk onto this, then the coffee. Oh my! It's just amazing!!
Dec 27, 2011 by hopeiam
2
votes
Hi The problem is not having a great seal, which is essential. Very simply, good espresso comes from machines which can generate huge amounts of pressure. Some of these machines in good coffee shops cost $40,000 and above... Bialetti produces a much superior stove top called the Bialetti 'Brikka'. The seals on this model are much improved and it has a pressure sensor built in (no electronics, just engineering). I recommend you give the other one to a friend and find a Brikka. It produces crema, which proves that the water has shot through the coffee at both high speed and high temperature. Good luck finding one I am English and had one sent out to me here in the US from London.
Jun 14, 2011 by Dominic C. Brown
2
votes
Rest assured, the maker is made in Italy (this is clearly written on the maker itself). I myself do not buy cheaply-made low-quality products 'made in China' (and contribute to slave-labor, I might add!).
Oct 1, 2013 by CARLOS ROMERO
1
vote
The Bialetti 6799 makes 3-2 oz. cups or 6 oz. total The Bialetti 6800 makes 6-2 oz. cups or 12 oz. total The Bialetti 6801 makes 9-2 oz. cups or 18 oz. total These cups are pretty strong so you can add more hot water or hot Milk after brewing and still have a great cup of coffee. I like about 6 oz. of coffee with about 4 oz. hot milk, tastes really good. If you want good coffee these Bialetti's are great but if you want a good espresso, then buy a good pump-driven espresso machine. Breville makes a great one.
Jul 25, 2013 by Popdon
1
vote
is a tamper included? Jan 31, 2014
No, there is no tamper; but check YouTube, etc - it is recommended to NOT ramp or only lightly. I use the back of a spoon.
Feb 1, 2014 by Urbana Jamie
1
vote
For me it makes two nice size cups of coffee. It might make six espresso cups. Thanks for asking.
Aug 25, 2014 by Raymond J. Garcia
1
vote
Boiled in Alum. Not a big deal, I'm going on 69 yrs. old. I did drink espresso from one in the 60's and I'm not dead yet. Don't worry, enjoy simple things of life.
Jan 12, 2015 by Notadev
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