Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.00
  • Save: $2.57 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Good Condition. Eligible For Prime Shipping
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Bible and Mission: Christian Witness in a Postmodern World Paperback – January 1, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0801027710 ISBN-10: 0801027713

Buy New
Price: $12.43
27 New from $9.75 27 Used from $7.68
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.43
$9.75 $7.68

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Bible and Mission: Christian Witness in a Postmodern World + Treasure in Clay Jars: Patterns in Missional Faithfulness (Gospel & Our Culture) + Missional Church: A Vision for the Sending of the Church in North America (Gospel & Our Culture)
Price for all three: $48.28

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Academic (January 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801027713
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801027710
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #42,042 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Richard Bauckham, (Ph.D., University of Cambridge) is professor of New Testament studies and Bishop Wardlaw Professor at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland. He is the author of numerous volumes, including The Theology of the Book of Revelation, God Crucified, and God and the Crisis of Freedom.

More About the Author

Mr Short lives in the rural outskirts of Ottawa, the capital of Canada, with his wife (and Muse), April, their two furry kids, Ian, a border(-line) collie and Miss Daisy, a stray American Fox Hound, together with too many cats and a small herd of camelids, which is why he refers to home as the Alpacalypse Farm.

A professional writer since high school, he is a Senior Member of the Society for Technical Communication, an award-winning playwright, a former magazine columnist and internationally-published author, as well as being a life-member of the Dominion of Canada Rifle Association, an avid motorcyclist, pilot and aircraft homebuilder.

While researching a series of novels he started writing when he taught small engine mechanics at the Embogo Training Centre, in Papua-New Guinea, he stumbled onto the real-life biography of Mata Hari. He found her tale so compelling he finished his first eBook novel, 'I am Mata Hari - the story of the world's most famous dancer, courtesan and spy,' before the original project, a trilogy that mirrors Canada's search for identity.

During the ePublishing process, Mr Short was astonished to find that - in his words - 'the instructions were weak for a new writer and in some cases other support materials - such as YouTube videos - were wrong'.

As the CEO of Devonia Technical Communication Services Incorporated, a technical documentation company he founded in 1995, he understood the need for clear instructions, written in a relaxed, conversational tone that would enable even novice MS-Word users to convert their manuscripts into high quality eBooks smoothly.

He is currently working on a suite of "How to ePublish" manuals with MS-Word, before writing another set of eBooks about his second great passion (the first is his wife), vintage British motorcycles, and returning to the long-overdue series of historical novels.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Warmly recommended as an excellent book on an important issue!
H. W. Kanis
Yet, when one thinks of it as Bauckham reflects, church is well ahead in its spread of globalism as universal metanarrative for all nations/peoples.
rodboomboom
Still others read like angry rants against chiliasts or some other error.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By H. W. Kanis on March 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
What is the relevance of Christian Mission for the turbulent world of the 21th century? Is it a threat to the cultural diversity of our various communities to be eagerly avoided or an asset for global citizens to be welcomed and promoted?
Does it result in an imperialistic McWorld? This is the key question which the NT theologian Richard Bauckham tries to answer through a fascinating biblical overview of God's missionary activity in world history. Starting from Abraham, the 'father' of 3 monotheistic religions passing through Israel, climaxing with Jesus Christ and ending with the missionary movement of God: the worldwide Christian Church of today. It is a penetrating and very illuminating analysis of the relevance and importance of Christian Mission for the (religious)struggles and economic problems of our present postmodern world. Bauckham convincingly defends the viewpoint that the God of the Bible is both universal and particular. The worldwide spread of Christian Mission in the biblical sense in the 21th century is the opposite of a 'tidal wave of religious homogenization and imperialism sweeping away all diversity of the world'. Warmly recommended as an excellent book on an important issue!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By rodboomboom HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on January 3, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bauckham ponders in very thoughtful and scholarly manner the question of today's mission in light of especially globalization of capitalism. This he contrasts with Biblical metanarrative of the particular in Christ becoming the universal in His Kingdom.

God's unfolding metanarrative in Christ continues against all challengers, but in postmodern context it faces stiff challenge of having any metanarrative that is universal. Bauckham fascinatingly answers that this is very similar context to when Christ came: a competing metanarrative in Roman Empire for universal dominance: "Within the Bible, the biblical metanarrative is rarely portrayed as the dominant metanarrative in its world." Now an economic globalism which spreads through instant, worldwide communication and information technology seeks to surpass and supplant all other competing metanarratives. In a postmodern time when its opposition is to any metanarrative that is put forward as universal, Bauckham rather encourages the church to proclaim the metanarrative of Jesus even more so: "This is both an essential part of our witness and the way we retain our knowledge of what it is to which we witness."

Hence, author's hermeneutical evidence that God's metanarrative in Christ crucified stands squarely opposed to such competing idolatries, but does so in non-violent way, even allowing wideranging cultural diversity within its midst. However, emphatic reminder to discernment and demand that its primary witness does not compromise with other metanarratives such as the marketing foundation of church growth playing into hands of economic captialistic globalism. Yet, when one thinks of it as Bauckham reflects, church is well ahead in its spread of globalism as universal metanarrative for all nations/peoples.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Erin J. on September 29, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This one is way better than the cover and title would suggest. Bauckham, for me, was very Walter Brueggemann like in this book. He skillfully shows how God works from very small beginnings and causes the small to greatly multiply. Follow along and watch how passages that have become old hat to you, now come to life as you go aha, why didn't I see it that way before. He does not make the mistake, like some in the American Church do, of mistaking God's mission for the world with the USA politcal agenda. This book is deep, but not a hard read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 23, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Being in seminary I read lots of books. Lots. Even when I am not in class, getting ahead for the next class makes for constant reading. It's the life of a graduate student - philosophy, theology, politics, science, and history - everything in sight. Some of the books that I read are good. Really good. Others are useful for treating insomnia. Still others read like angry rants against chiliasts or some other error.

Once in a while a book comes along that falls into the middle. It cannot be classified as good or bad. In this case, the content is outstanding, and I wish every pastor would read the book. Then again, maybe not. The language is academic and periodically quite dry. But if you can get past that, Richard Bauckham's Bible and Mission: Christian Witness in a Postmodern World is an outstanding, challenging work.

A few quotes stood out to me as I read through it. Here is one:

The New Testament gives the church in every age its missionary identity by plunging it into the midst of the biblical story where the words of the great commission still ring in its ears. (p. 25)

But I was grabbed by the particular points. He confronts the failure of "postmodern" ideas and properly identifies it as a variant on Christian eschatology as well as a miserable failure. (p. 88) It maintains its place by power and domination. In addition, he sets up the principle that hanging onto this approach.

Consistent with this he separates the church from the progressive ideals of liberalism. (p. 20) He sees no place for the dialectical approach within Christian missiology. That's a point which makes the work stand out - it expresses a proper Chrisitan militancy against the ways of the world.

Unfortunately it also exposes the singular weakness of the book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search