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Big Girls Don't Cry Paperback – July 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: One World/Ballantine; Reprint edition (July 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0345413628
  • ISBN-13: 978-0345413628
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,366,435 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

One black woman's journey to fulfillment is the subject of Briscoe's new novel. As in Sisters and Lovers, social issues play a large role in her heroine's story. In Washington, D.C., in the early 1960s, Naomi Jefferson agonizes over middle-class teenage concerns until her older brother, Joshua, a college student agitated about racism, dies under suspicious circumstances. A few years later, after some romantic disappointments and rough times in college in Atlanta, a chastened Naomi returns to her parents' home and finds work in a city councilman's office, where dim prospects for advancement?and an unhappy, drug-addled relationship?drive her back to school. Eventually, she joins a large consulting firm and gets engaged to architect Marshall Underwood. Then her plans are disrupted not only by the denial of a promotion but also by the sudden appearance of an unruly teenager claiming to be Joshua's son. Other complications ensue, but a happy ending for Naomi is never in doubt. Briscoe's pacing is brisk, and the plot touches on a range of key social issues: civil rights, affirmative action and intragroup prejudice. Although the dialogue is sometimes self-conscious, and Briscoe lacks Terry McMillan's brash zest, her empathetic portrait of a modern woman wrestling with issues of love, work and family obligations should add to her popularity as a chronicler of contemporary African American life. $150,000 ad/promo; author tour.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

A coming-of-age story of a middle- class black woman growing up in the strife-torn early 1960s. From the author of Sisters and Lovers (LJ 4/15/95).
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Fiction:
--Money Can't Buy Love (Grand Central Publishing/Hachette)
--Sisters and Husbands (Grand Central Publishing/Hachette)
--Can't Get Enough (Doubleday)
--PG County (Doubleday)
--A Long Way From Home (HarperCollins)
--Big Girls Don't Cry (HarperCollins)
--Sisters and Lovers (HarperCollins)

Nonfiction:
Jewels: 50 Phenomenal Black Women Over 50

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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It will make you cry and laugh out loud at the same time.
Gabriella Christina
I read this book when I was a 15 year old high school student I am now a 21 year old college student and I still remeber and love this book.
KEKE
It was like you were there with Naomi...it all seemed so real.
SLewis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nardsbaby VINE VOICE on April 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
Even in the 60's the main issue for a teenager appears to be doin' it! In the middle class section of Washington, D.C. Naomi Jefferson lives a normal life that is occasionally spoiled by racism.

"Normality" appears to dip off when Joshua, her older brother dies. Now the differences between race in America becomes a very personal plight as Naomi is set on honoring her brother.

This girl just can't get it together. Leaving too many regrets and bumpy roads back in Atlanta. Naomi returns to her parents' where she finds work in a city councilman's office. With no room for advancement and the weight of an unhappy relationship Naomi finds herself back off to school.

In time Naomi joins a consulting firm, and is engaged. Just as she's passed over for a different position things in her life seem to be oh so hectic. Only to add the sudden knowledge of a teen age boy that is her brother's son. Is this true? Naomi is determined that her nephew will have the opportunities that her brother didn't.

As Naomi battles daily with issues of family obligations is there room for love?

Tee mentioned she was reading "Big girls don't cry" I found out that she was speaking of an anthology that is currently out. Although I read this some years back; I liked Connie Briscoe's read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By M. J Pronio on June 12, 2002
Format: Library Binding
This book was great because it spanned a young woman's life... from young frienship, puberty, sexual awakening, parental struggle, independence, love, hurt, and all of those things over again.
Naomi is a 13 year old girl who is from a middle-class black family from Washington, D.C. Her parents are educated and articulate, but used to living the lives of people who are supressed. Her brother Joshua, decides to strike out against the white man... this is during our nations time of extreme strife - late 60's- early 70's. He is smart, supportive and determined to make a difference.
Meanwhile, Naomi is concerned with hanging out with the 'priveleged ones' who live on what is called the 'gold coast' of Washington D.C. neighborhoods. She is also concerned about dating and then eventually the big question of 'doing it' even though her Mama has warned her against 'letting a boy touch her'... it could ruin her life.
The book travels from Naomi's pre-pubescent life to college to early adult-hood, to mature woman... all the while exploring what all young women go through.
Wonderful story... a can't miss !
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 29, 1997
Format: Hardcover
Big Girls Don't Cry is entertaining and yet very familiar. Those of us who grew up in the 60's and 70's can relate to Naomi Jefferson's different predicaments and how she handles life's ups and downs. Naomi appears so grown up at times and yet she is a little intimidated by life.
At the very beginning of the story, Naomi lets you know she has a mind of her own and challenges any decisions that are made on her behalf. But as she goes through adolescense and into womanhood, she loses some of that self-confidence when it comes to her relationships with men. She isn't very rational at times and falls into the trap of letting herself become a door mat for these men that she so-calls, loves.
I love the way, Ms. Briscoe leads you into Naomi's life so much that you find yourself wondering what is going to happen to her next or you think that's it, she hits you with another twist to the story and you cannot put the book down.
We have all been there at some time in our life. It's facinating to read how someone else handles the dilemmas of life.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "savvyblackreader" on June 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
Connie Briscoe's BIG GIRLS DON'T CRY is a well-written novel that captures the readers soul. The novel spans the life of Naomi Jefferson, a young girl who lives through some of the most exciting times in our nation's history. She lives through the Civil Rights Movement, the seventies, the birth of the computer age and into our modern times. Along with the killings of several of our nation's best leaders, Naomi's brother, Josh, who had so much going for him, is killed in a tragic car accident---or at least that's what the police report claimed.
Evil roots of over-exposure to racism are what motivate Naomi into becoming a successful woman in all aspects. She matures during the computer age and goes against all odds career-wise, romance-wise, family-wise and most importantly she invests in herself and becomes more that she was ever expected to be.
Connie Briscoe brings real-world experiences and historical references to this novel and the outcoming result is a shining work of literary greatness!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By R. Anthony Mills on March 18, 2001
Format: Library Binding
Something I've realized after discussing various books with folks from differing backgrounds; if you can't relate, it's a little harder to digest. It's amazing that I had this book on my shelf at least three years before I realized it was there. After the urging of a friend, I finally read it. I was not disappointed.
Though the ending is a bit "cinderella-ish," it's worth reading. Reading it, I felt as if there were a few people I knew who could fit the mold of Naomi. Everyone, at some point or another, goes through major life crises that causes an assessment of goals set as children. From that we refocus our aims and move forward whole-heartedly with a renewed since of purpose. Naomi did it and became a success. Can you relate?
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