Start reading Big Girls Don't Cry on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

Big Girls Don't Cry: The Election that Changed Everything for American Women [Kindle Edition]

Rebecca Traister
4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $15.00
Kindle Price: $9.73
You Save: $5.27 (35%)
Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc

Whispersync for Voice

Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration. Add narration for a reduced price of $3.99 after you buy the Kindle book. Learn More

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $9.73  
Hardcover $19.83  
Paperback $13.50  
MP3 CD, Audiobook, MP3 Audio, Unabridged $22.49  
Unknown Binding --  
Audible Audio Edition, Unabridged $20.95 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
Kindle Delivers
Kindle Delivers
Subscribe to the Kindle Delivers monthly e-mail to find out about each month's Kindle book deals, new releases, editors' picks and more. Learn more (U.S. customers only)

Book Description

Journalist and Salon writer Rebecca Traister investigates the 2008 presidential election and its impact on American politics, women and cultural feminism. Examining the role of women in the campaign, from Clinton and Palin to Tina Fey and young voters, Traister confronts the tough questions of what it means to be a woman in today’s America.

The 2008 campaign for the presidency reopened some of the most fraught American conversations—about gender, race and generational difference, about sexism on the left and feminism on the right—difficult discussions that had been left unfinished but that are crucial to further perfecting our union. Though the election didn’t give us our first woman president or vice president, the exhilarating campaign was nonetheless transformative for American women and for the nation. In Big Girls Don’t Cry, her electrifying, incisive and highly entertaining first book, Traister tells a terrific story and makes sense of a moment in American history that changed the country’s narrative in ways that no one anticipated.

Throughout the book, Traister weaves in her own experience as a thirtysomething feminist sorting through all the events and media coverage—vacillating between Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama and questioning her own view of feminism, the women’s movement, race and the different generational perspectives of women working toward political parity. Electrifying, incisive and highly entertaining, Big Girls Don’t Cry offers an enduring portrait of dramatic cultural and political shifts brought about by this most historic of American contests.


Editorial Reviews

Review

“I didn't know what I didn't know about the 2008 election until reading Rebecca Traister’s smart, entertaining take on it. Well-researched, well-written, provocative, and insightful, BGDC is a high-spirited salute to feminism in its many forms.” —Curtis Sittenfeld, author of American Wife

About the Author

Rebecca Traister is senior writer for Salon, where she has written about women in politics, media, and entertainment since 2003, and where she covered the 2008 presidential campaign from a feminist perspective. She has also written for Elle, the Nation, the New York Observer, Vogue and the New York Times, among other publications. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband.

Product Details

  • File Size: 2051 KB
  • Print Length: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press; Reprint edition (September 14, 2010)
  • Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003L786NM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #369,675 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
38 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Big Girls Do Cry September 14, 2010
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
For those of us who were actively involved in the 2008 election, this book is a must read. One may not agree with Ms Traister's take on it but will marvel at her wit and unique insight, especially when speaking of the immense pressure felt uniquely by woman. As someone who is still fairly "bitter" about what happened to the first extraordinarily qualified woman to run for President, I laughed, cried and fumed as I turned the page. From "You're nice enough" to a "thrill running up my leg" comments and the inept Clinton campaign management, my personal memories were jarred and reawakened reminding me that perhaps we haven't come that long a way baby.
As one who was forever changed by the election, I look forward to the discussion which should be started by this book. Unfortunately, as a woman, this book by Rebecca Traister might not receive the same hoopla by the media that accompanied "Game Change" as I fear- we really haven't come that long a way-hope I'm wrong on this one.
Was this review helpful to you?
24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You've Come a Long Way, Sweetie September 17, 2010
Format:Kindle Edition
Presidential campaigns have always been one part spectator sport and one part democracy in action. Participate if you want, but don't expect anything to change. But 2008 took more out of us than previous campaigns. It was exhausting on a whole new level. Even the stoics among us were in such a weakened condition by election day that we were all crying, with joy that America had elected a black president, with frustration that so many things had been said and done that could never be taken back, with relief that the marathon was over.

Maybe I'm a glutton for punishment, but I have already read a couple of the behind-the-scenes accounts of the election (Game Change: Obama and the Clintons, McCain and Palin, and the Race of a Lifetime, Renegade: The Making of a President), which were interesting, but ultimately forgettable. Reading Big Girls Don't Cry brought back the most infuriating moments of the year leading up to the election. This isn't the just story of the candidates, it's the story of how the 2008 campaign brought out the still-raw feelings of the women's movement. It's about how on one hand, women are more influential and powerful than we have ever been, but on the other hand, women hold only about 17% of the seats in the House and Senate.

Rebecca Traister recounts that many of her thirty-ish friends who assumed their lefty boyfriends were progressive, found them to be about as traditional as their grandfathers when it came to women's issues. It was a bit unsettling to read that Obama has a habit of calling women reporters "sweetie.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm not prejudiced but . . . October 18, 2010
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
A riveting recap of the full-of-surprises 2008 election, including the inexplicably harsh treatment Hillary Clinton received from even the liberal media, especially the boys at MSNBC.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
By Stacey
Format:Hardcover
I just finished listening to the audible.com edition of Big Girls Don't Cry by Rebecca Traister on a cross country road trip. I was surprised at how much I enjoyed it. Traister, a writer for Salon.com, lays out an insightful and thorough examination of the 2008 election campaign and what it meant for feminism, sexism, and women in this country. As a 40 year old woman who sits somewhere between the Gloria Steinem/2nd Wave feminist generation and the 20-something blogosphere feminism, I found that Traister's observations as well as the those of the many influential women she interviewed echoed many of my own. There were times when I felt like I was re-living the anger and disappointment raised by the Clinton and Palin campaigns. Even more enraging was the media treatment of both women which is carefully and chronologically documented in the book through excerpts, quotes, and historical context.

My political involvement during the 2008 election was limited to listening to NPR and watching Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert. So, I was fairly insulated from the worst of the media sexism and stupidity. This book reminded me that I still need to be paying attention. When we pay attention, we speak out, and that is one thing which wasn't happening enough in 2008.

If there is one thing that I didn't love about this book - it was Traister's occasionally long-winded observations of her own emotional state during the campaign. While I appreciate that sexism, racism and politics are emotional as well as intellectual, and I often felt the same way she did, I enjoyed the concrete examples and historical context much more. Not really a criticism... but an acknowledgement that this book is about a woman's own personal political journey as well as a nation's.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hmmm November 16, 2011
Format:Hardcover
There is a wide-eyed, enthusiastic engagement here that would be appealing if it wasn't combined with an inclination toward comparing "the year that changed everything for American women" with the long and winding road of feminism and the fight for gender equality powered with a background white noise that smacks of the new girls critiquing the old broads. Maybe it's my greybeard status that has me feeling discomfited, and maybe I'm taking this tome personally, when it's just commentary. And maybe I'm just flat out wrong. Traister's enthusiasm for the subject is evident and engaging, but there are too many snipes from the author, and reportage of the same from others. The 2008 Presidential race was enthralling and historic on so many levels, there can be hundreds of books analyzing what happened from a myriad of angles. I was eager for a younger woman's opinion from a close-to perspective. What I did not expect was more rehashing of the divisiveness of "second wave feminism" from 40 years ago to be included in the analysis. I'd hoped we'd outgrown that. We all want a brighter future. And we work for it seeing in our rearview mirror the remarkable and courageous work of the women who came before.
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars ALL GIRLS CRY!!!
I'll be honest here... I REALLY wanted Hillary to win in 08. Now I completely understand why she didn't and just how unfair female politicians are treated by even the most liberal... Read more
Published 18 days ago by Gina Doles
5.0 out of 5 stars Great analysis of 2008 elections from a feminist anle
Dense, rich, well articulated analysis of the 2008 elections from a feminist perspective. Very powerful and comprehensive. Worth every word.
Published 2 months ago by Patricia Miranda
5.0 out of 5 stars Election book
I am interested in political issues and especially those that dovetail with women's issues, so this is a good fit for what I like.
Published 17 months ago by Eleanor S. Lienau
5.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting take on women in and around politics
Definitely Worth reading for an analysis of the women in the presidential race Obama/Mc Cain. Thought provoking and compelling work.
Published 20 months ago by MLE LAURE JOUTEAU
5.0 out of 5 stars Big Girls Don't Cry: The Election that Changed Everything for American...
A very interesting and informative book reflecting on the first, second, and third wave of feminism and the background issues over the past decade.
Published 20 months ago by Marilyn Propp
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent cultural analysis of issues in 2007-8 primaries
I found the book well written and the topic fascinating. I like the complexity it brought out and how the election fits in the progress towards cultural change.
Published 20 months ago by Hannah
5.0 out of 5 stars Razor Sharp Commentary & Reporting on Women in America
For a while there in 2008, it was reassuring to hear the statistic that three out of four Americans were 'comfortable' with a woman president, half of whom said they were 'very... Read more
Published on March 20, 2012 by Selena Rezvani
5.0 out of 5 stars The best explanation of the machinations behind 2008 election, EVER!
If you can read this book and NOT get all riled up (as we say here in Kentucky) about the scumbags and poop-stirrers that operate this nation's media, there's something seriously... Read more
Published on March 15, 2012 by Sharon
5.0 out of 5 stars You Go Girl... Ehhhh... Girls (A Male Perspective)
Ms. Traister's part memoir, part campaign analysis is a very astute, level-headed observation of what occurred during the 2008 Presidential campaign. Read more
Published on August 25, 2011 by Franklin the Mouse
1.0 out of 5 stars Why is Kindle more expensive than print?
One of the reasons I bought my Kindle was because Amazon.com advertised that ebooks are cheaper than print ones. And why not? They are digital! Read more
Published on March 22, 2011 by TDPM
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Forums

Topic From this Discussion
Another loser political fiction like Pelosi's stinker?
You haven't even opened the book yet and you're already judging it negatively. (What's the definition of "prejudice", again?) Your comment throws no light on the book but does afford an interesting peek into your psyche, Mr. Gump.
Nov 8, 2010 by leila |  See all 2 posts
Have something you'd like to share about this product?
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Look for Similar Items by Category