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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Bright Book of a Woman's Life
I've admired Susie Bright's candid, direct, and wide open sexual expression for a great many years, from her early writing in the lesbian tabloid "On Our Backs" right through to her current blog [...]. Here is a woman who took on a number of risky and controversial causes, especially the celebration of a bawdy and earthy female bisexuality with a primarily lesbian...
Published on March 4, 2011 by Federico (Fred) Moramarco

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Erotica writer Susie Bright documents her interesting life
To enjoy Big Sex Little Death thoroughly, it helps to already be a fan of Susie Bright, the woman who helped found On Our Backs, one of the major lesbian magazines of the 80s and 90s. Susie Bright is also known as an erotica editor and author.

In this memoir, the bisexual Bright documents her life, from childhood to almost the present day. She suffered under...
Published on April 16, 2011 by Ilovebooks


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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Bright Book of a Woman's Life, March 4, 2011
This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
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I've admired Susie Bright's candid, direct, and wide open sexual expression for a great many years, from her early writing in the lesbian tabloid "On Our Backs" right through to her current blog [...]. Here is a woman who took on a number of risky and controversial causes, especially the celebration of a bawdy and earthy female bisexuality with a primarily lesbian identity, against the anti-sex prophets of what I would call the right wing of the feminist movement--people like Andrea Dworkin and Katherine McKinnon and much of the male-bashing academic feminist establishment. Dworkin, who died in 2005, once argued that heterosexual intercourse itself was a form of rape.

I'm also one of her thousands of Facebook friends and regard her site as one of the best portals to the good things going on on the internet--politically, socially, and erotically. Like me she regards most internet pornography as tediously bad and knows how to distinguish between honesty and in-authenticity in sexuality better than anyone that I know. As a long time editor of "The Best American Erotica" and many other collections of sexually-oriented writing, she also knows how to distinguish between good imaginative writing and porno hack jobs.

She has now published a memoir called "Big Sex, Little Death," and it is a revelation, because it goes beyond the persona created in her erotica and gives us a detailed portrait of the cerebral, radical, flesh and blood person she is and where the components that make up her identity come from.

Susie Bright, the name is perfect for her--kind of oozing intelligence and light--is the only child of Elizabeth Halloran and William Bright, born in Arlington, Virginia in the late 1950's. Her parents were academics and separated shortly after her birth, then divorced. She remembers a high school English teacher who attributed her "out of line" behavior to the fact that she was the product of a broken home. In the years since, a "broken home" has become more the norm than the exception, and the phrase itself seems as antiquated as eight track cassettes. Nonetheless, she was deeply affected by her parents' divorce, especially by her mother's erratic and isolated ways. She describes a horrific event early along when her mother drove her to the edge of the iced-over Saskatchewan River after the twelve-year old Susie had lost her glasses and was told by her mom, "you won't need them in the bottom of the river," and then when the confused child asked where they were going responded "I'm driving us into the river."

It's no wonder that Bright writes "If you were to ask me what the happiest days of my life were, I would say the day that my daughter was born...and the first week I spent reunited with my dad." This happened when she was in her early teens and her mother had asked her father to take care of her permanently. Living with her father was liberating. Both her sex life and her political life began at the tender age of fourteen; she tells us casually on page 85 that after she became involved with a socialist high school paper appropriately called The Red Tide, "I also started having sex. Not with anyone at school, but with the socialists, the ones with all the ideas in their heads." Her political and sexual identities were formed early and have been sustained in unison ever since.

"Big Sex, Little Death" is divided into three sections--the first dealing with her childhood, the second with her adolescence, and the third with all of her adulthood. This gives the book a bit of a skewered feel. Two thirds of the volume deals with a bit more than one third of her life, while the last third of it covers some thirty-three years. (Bright turns 53 this year). This may be because the last third covers the Susie Bright we generally know about--one of the founders of "On Our Backs" and the editor or author of a shelf-full of erotic writings. She was "present at the creation" of a new kind of feminist-based sensuality and a witness to the San Francisco-based sexual turmoil of the 80s and 90s. She chronicles both the AIDS epidemic and the sexual revolution in some detail, and the devastation that both left in their wake. We know a great deal about the former, but less about the latter, and it's surprising to encounter the litany of deaths and suicides associated with the young women who worked in San Francisco sex clubs (p. 243) as well of being reminded of the fratricide committed by Jim Mitchell, one of the famous Mitchell Brothers who ran the notorious O'Farrell Theater in the 70's and 80's and produced porno films including "Beyond the Green Door," which was one of the biggest porno-pop hits of the period.

The only thing we don't get to find out too much about is her long-term relationship with the man in her life (Jon) and particular details about her interactions with her daughter Aretha, now a young woman. Yes, she does offer some good advice about parenthood: "Don't hit them. Don't lie to them. Respect their privacy and your own," but there's little more. Well, I certainly respect her right to privacy in these areas, but many of her readers might like to know about how it was for Aretha growing up with such a sexually explicit mom, and whether her ongoing connection with a man in her life has made her monogamous, or if their relationship is an open one. These seem important omissions for a woman who has made most of her life an open book, but I'm sure there are more than a few pages yet uncut.

Nonetheless, the best thing about Susie Bright's writing is the clarity and vividness of her style as well as it's very personal tone. She has the gift of writing as if she's sitting across a table from you and talking with you casually, even about outrageous things like her mother's threatening to kill her and commit suicide and having threesomes at age fifteen with her girlfriend Danielle, age fourteen, with a series of "older men." Listen: "I felt safe and bold with Danielle--I'd do things with her I'd never do by myself. We could seduce anyone; we could get out of--or into--any situation that we wished. When we were alone she told me that my kissing was terrible, that Americans didn't know how to kiss. She ran a bath for us, and when we got into the tub to practice, we turned on the shower, too, the water pouring down our heads....Men were intimidated by us, which we thought was funny. Funny, but great leverage. For the first couple of months of my sex life, I was too intimidated to do anything alone with a guy--Danielle was my big dog, my fearless leader, the one I could temper and reason with. I loved her. Sex with her, alone, made me shiver. We never talked about it." I quote this at length to give you a sense of the flavor of Bright's precise, talkative, and unadorned prose. Simple declarative sentences, precise detail, and secretive matters you feel like she is sharing just with you. Of course she isn't, but that's the illusion created by this kind of exactitude. This is unquestionably Bright's best and most important book.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Big Mom, Little Daughter, April 5, 2011
By 
Dan E. Nicholas "gotta have a book" (Scotts Valley, California, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
It's not often you read a memoir where more than half the book has rolled by and the author has not yet reached the ripe old age of 17. Indeed, 3/4ths of Big Sex Little Death has pinballed down Bright's Lombard Street life before college reaches 2nd gear. This is Susie Bright. The sex, the love of art and truth, the self discovery, the justice and family thing--it's all on fire here in a delightfully naughty history lesson. Yet the guns and the blood in her tale, even the bullhorn drone and the human seed running down her teenage leg and life remain eclipsed by her passion for the simple call of truth telling.

Yes, and the mom thing. Her station as daughter and mom in this life continues to set her apart as a thinker and writer in the realm of sexual politics and publishing. Among sex talkers and writers aplenty these day she's one of a handful who have braved motherhood and lived to tell the sex part of the story openly.

I found her childhood account uncommon only in the severity with which she embraced it all, finding a way to survive with a heart childlike and open. Indeed, I was surprised to learn that it was her success with thin skin poetry that opened the first door for her in publishing. A great encouragement here for young writers. Yet the mom thing will always define Susie Bright for me. It's how she sees herself to this day. Having one, being one. She's a true traditional untraditionalist. We listen to her because she lives where we all have lived as sons and daughters. But she does it all never selling out her eroticism from youth to middle age.

Perhaps the funniest part of this hardbound book is its color: black and white. A little joke no doubt. If a world abides anywhere in the universe as black and white, it's no place where this woman lives. She's always been every ounce nuance, every bit color and question mark. Even when she pontificates away I read her as one open to ideas and a possible new way yet of looking at things.

But having a daughter remains the key kernel of madness in her art and life for me I think. Maybe because I've one too, near in age. Also, as politically incorrect as it might be in her field as sexpert and lesbian pioneer she does not hide that it was the positive masculine input of her father, Bill Bright, that remains an anchor for this literary storm we call Susie. Oh, and for heaven's sake, this out-there lesbian trail blazer woman has a long time serious male friend, Jon, an "all but married" life partner relationship no less. She never apologizes. She just loves.

However full and fantastic this tale of her youth, I still get that this erotic literary nut tree woman is never going to stray far from her Irish Catholic roots. It's an underground current that nourishes her writing and sex and commitment to motherhood. I'm sure she knows this. Again, there's a nun somewhere to be sent flowers for this.

What stood out for me in BSLD is how she kept reinventing herself; and how chance and circumstance played a big part. She never seemed to let bitterness whack her down for even a whole day. Raised by a whack job mom who tried to undue her, she loves. In family, in business, in the world of friends, she is betrayed. All these players bring Judas to her again and again yet she harbors no bitter seed, just that platonic Susannahism where wonder remains the beginning of all wisdom and philosophy. No doubt Big Sex Little Death is just Part One of the Susie wonder woman tale. This woman can sure tell a story. I await Part Two.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Susie's Sex and Socialism, May 16, 2011
This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
Though she has written other books, and has been open about sexual matters (and eager to help others out with sexual issues; she wasn't called Susie Sexpert for nothing), Susie Bright has capped her previous works now with heartfelt and illuminating recollections in _Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir_ (Seal Press). Bright is one of the people who has shaped current American sexuality. She was an advisor for (and had a cameo role in) the Wachowski Brothers lesbian-themed film _Bound_, for instance, and helped found the first US magazine of lesbian erotica. Though she has produced her own lesbian porn, and was enthusiastically lesbian in her twenties, she has been out as a bisexual ever since she was a teenager, and at 32 she had a daughter and even settled down with a guy. There is plenty of coverage of her sexual exploits here, and some of the encounters are steamy. There aren't enough of them, however, to repay the effort of just flipping the pages to find "the good parts." Instead, Bright has written mostly about her extraordinarily difficult upbringing and her years as a youthful activist for socialism. The time she was behind the counter at the Good Vibrations toy store is here, as is her founding and editing of the magazine _On Our Backs_, and her heartbreak of letting that effort go. There's not much about her advice columns, or her feminist reviews of erotic films, or her current weekly audio program _In Bed with Susie Bright_, or her website, or her blog. She's been busy; this funny, wide-eyed, and poignant memoir is bound to get sequels.

Bright was born in 1958, with parents she now says, looking back, "were far more radical than I am, because of basic changes in their generation." She is proud of both parents, even her mother who abused her. They died a few years ago, but Bright's book is dedicated to them both. In high school, Bright discovered sex and socialism. She began to write for the underground high school newspaper _The Red Tide_. She left school early to to work as a full-time labor organizer within the International Socialists. There were blue-collar organizers quoting Marx and Lenin, and enthusiastic coitus with both sexes to help storm the barriers, and Teamsters and other drivers to organize. The movement, however, was schismatic, and kicked her out; if not, would she still be trying to turn truckers into socialists instead of trying to bring everyone sexual enlightenment? It was time for her to go back to school, this time to college, and eventually to the "feminist vibrator store," Good Vibrations, where she loved interacting with customers. Lost ladies might come in and say something like, "My husband has died and I will never achieve climax again," or, "The therapist has told me I am sexually dysfunctional and sent me here." She went on to found _On Our Backs_, which she edited from 1984 to 1991. It featured pornography, leather, fetishes, and celebrations of female lust and eroticism. It was not in line with the feminism of the time. Bright has called herself a "sex-positive feminist," in contrast with the ones who put out publications such as _Off Our Backs_ (note the difference a couple of letters makes) and who thought that pornography hurt women or promoted violence against them. Bright has always been as unapologetic about enjoying pornography (she edits collections of it) as she has about enjoying sex. Eventually it came time for her to quit the magazine, and she writes of the difficult decision movingly because she left explicitly to take care of her daughter. "I did get pregnant unexpectedly. I spent the first thirty-one years of my life being either a lesbian or a complete martinet about birth control, and all of a sudden, I got sloppy. It was out of character." The worst part was worrying about her temper, about keeping a vow that her daughter would never be hit or have the truth hidden from her. She called the daughter Aretha, and hilariously her parents both approved, because they knew the name came from the Greek meaning "the very best." They knew nothing about popular music: "Only Bill and Elizabeth, of all the people in the world, would respond to the name Aretha with the enthusiasm of the antiquities."

Aretha seems to have turned out well, and it would be nice to know the details of how she came to terms with her mother's openness about sexuality and about her past, but the current memoir winds up with Bright, Aretha, and Jon heading to Santa Cruz. (She met Jon because she needed her tires changed, shortly before she became pregnant, and they continue to be partners.) There will be more to this story, and I am going to be happy to tune into any next volume.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Susie's Street-Level View of the Left, May 2, 2011
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This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
Susie Bright could have described her life in any number of ways and gotten a receptive hearing from her many fans, but she digs deep in this autobiography, giving us four slices from her life that I found utterly satisfying, full of twists and turns. First, she gives an entertaining view of her family origins, grandparents down. Second, she describes her days as a labor organizer. Third, we get the story behind "On Our Backs," the revolutionary, lesbian sex magazine she co-founded and ran. Then she rounds out the book with the birth of her daughter and the effect that had on her life.
I loved the family part, but the book tripped into couldn't-put-it-down land when her work on the radical high school newspaper she started, the Red Tide, leads to her joining a hard core socialist group. She drops out of high school, goes to "Commie Camp," moves to Detroit and then Louisville to organize labor. It's a tale of left-wing America that I had never read before. In stories from the right and middle, the left is vilified as a Judas. In stories from the left, things are usually depicted as rosy, beyond credulity and neither seems right.
Susie's description of her experiences reads like an innocent Alice in a radical Wonderland full of pointless violence and betrayal. You see the American left eating itself alive from street level. It's like reading a history of the French revolution, except it's people who speak your language and wear jeans.
From here, we follow Susie to college and then to her founding of "On Our Backs," the groundbreaking, lesbian erotic magazine. The magazine struggles financially and gets hounded mercilessly by the mainstream feminist movement. In a way, it's a nightmarish replay of the previous act, with fewer guns and more lesbians. Susie gets death threats and hate mail by the bushel. She's assaulted on college campuses by women's studies majors driven into frenzies of hatred.
While mainstream feminists engaged in a resentful, but nonetheless awe-filled, worship of the patriarchy (from which all things come), the strippers and dykes at "On Our Backs" engaged in an essential exercise of self-expression and lived their sexuality out loud, without anyone's permission and certainly without anyone's approval.
In 2000, one of the founders of Ms. Magazine, Brenda Feigen, wrote a biography about her participation in mainstream feminism. The story of her personal life includes a divorce and an entry into a relationship with a woman. In my opinion, her coming out simply isn't possible without Susie Bright. I'm pretty sure that statement would be scoffed at in the hallways of Ms. Magazine or the Harvard women's studies department, but I'm also pretty sure that it's true. Feigen's biography is called, "Not One of the Boys." Susie could have trumped that title with "Not One of the Boys Nor One of the Girls." She very much blazed her own trail.
Susie's pregnancy in her early thirties, her exit from "On Our Backs" in the middle of new single motherhood, her finding a place in academia and her now-long-term relationship with Jon, an artist she falls in love with, may read like a postscript to some, but as a new father myself, I found these chapters compelling. She shares her anxieties about parenthood and recounts her failings and successes and the effect that having a child had on her life.
All in all, a great read and a chapter in feminist history that is not coming to a university near you, unless you're lucky enough to have Susie Bright as a professor.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Susie Bright's Memoir is Brilliant, Funny, Wise, Meaningful, April 22, 2011
This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
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I knew I was in for a treat when I was laughing out loud on the second page as Bright mentions how women's memoirs are about dieting, and men's memoirs are about climbing mountains "with their bare teeth". Bright manages to provide insight on the memoir genre within her writing in the genre. She is so smart, so funny, and so skilled at cutting to the heart of truth, power, injustice, and the reality of life. What a delight to get to know her life history and what shaped her amazing mind! Love the book, and love Susie Bright even more than before. I even found my husband, who only likes to read non-fiction science books, picking up the book and not being able to put it down. The best memoir I've read in a really long time!

I also liked reading about a "family" that isn't all about family, but rather people who exited the confines of their traditional families. Like Bright, my parents moved to California in the 60's to forge a new identity and abandon the past, so it was refreshing to read about that type of family history since so much of what is crammed down our throats is nostalgia for nuclear family and doing the same thing and living in the same town your whole life.

I also think she provides valuable insight into her focus on sexuality. I don't like that she gets pigeonholed as being all about erotica, since she clearly reveals through her childhood experiences that its about navigating the entry points, or violation points, of the body that is at that heart of the matter. She illustrates this so poignantly with a story about being bitten as a child. I gained a new insights into her core beliefs about sexuality, and that its not really about "sex". This was a great insight to have on her body of work.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More about politics than sex., March 6, 2011
By 
Herblady22 "Herblady" (Park Slope, Brooklyn, NY USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
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I have enjoyed Susie Bright's wit and outspokeness since discovering her Susie Sexpert column many years ago along with her volumes of female erotica collections. Her autobiography has a lot more pain, more politics and less sex and wit than you might expect. I had not realized how thoroughly she had been trashed during the Andrea Dworkin- Katherine McKinnon anti-sex era of feminism and it probably explains why I was never easily able to find On Our Backs, the first women-centered erotica magazine during that era. Bright was one of those who were able to embrace sexuality in all its polymorphous splendor and to let women feel good about their fantasies, without the imposition of political correctness.

Bright suffered significantly from the lack of a stable home after her parents' divorce and her mother's emotional breakdown. Therein lies the root of her being marginalized, sexually exploited in her early teens, exposed to physical danger and stabbing during her political work. While she often participated willingly, one wonders how she would have fared in a more nurturing environment.

After burning out with the International Socialists while still a teenager, she returned to California, eventually getting work at Joanie Blank's female-oriented sexual toy store, Good Vibrations. It was there that Bright first gained her reputation as a "Sexpert". At a time when vibrators can be found in mainstream magazines and a number of women-oriented sex toy stores started by Good Vibrations alumni now dot the landscape, it is easy to forget how revolutionary this was.

On Our Backs, started by dancers from the famed Northbeach San Francisco club, the Lusty Lady, was a direct challenge to the sexual prudery of the Off Our Back's feminist anti-porn crusade and Bright joined up at its inception. It inspired a lot of negative feedback from the very women's bookstores that might have championed it, at a critical point in feminism, although the sentiments behind the magazine subsequently were adopted into the mainstream. The Mitchell Brothers who directed a number of well-known "couples" porn films helped it along. Having read stories of the era from Lusty Lady dancers, Pat Califa, Joanie Blank and others, I found the story fascinating.

Bright can write well, and does in places. But with such painful material, she often retreats into sparse description. The experience of having her daughter Aretha and her husband Jon are given short shrift, understandable perhaps but it hurts the narrative. It might well have served her to wait many years before writing a memoir when she could do more justice to the topic.

As for the title, it has little to do with the book, harkening more to Bright's reputation as Susie Sexpert than to the book she actually wrote. Probably not Bright's doing, but the publishers should have had the confidence to reflect her real story.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Like spending a long weekend with a friend, September 5, 2011
This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
Susie's book is very conversational; I feel like I just spend hours and hours getting to know a fascinating new friend.

I came to the book with only the vaguest ideas of her history, and found myself fascinated with the many twists and turns of her story. She and I are about the same age, but where I've almost always taken the easy and expected road, she has done so many outrageous and adventurous things. I felt as though I were looking at an alternate-universe view of my life.

I listened to the book on audio, and greatly enjoyed spending time with Susie.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The only complaint is that I want more, August 8, 2011
This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
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Susie Bright was the feminist that I loved to read in college. I went to the University of Minnesota in the early 90s when the MacKinnon/Dworkin crowd had rampaged through and turned feminism into the last bastion of the humorless and self-righteous (ok, there was that war too and those peace protesters were obnoxious) and a group called Men Against Rape & Sexism (aka MARS) thought that there was nothing better in the cause of ending rape than to pass out flyers at a campus screening of Showgirls (and mocking them for it was just attracting trouble). The Porn=Rape ideology was strong at the time which automatically served to turn otherwise sympathetic adherents away. I believe in equal rights, equal pay for equal work and a closer examination of sexual harassment in the workplace but relentless scolding for the enjoyment of erotic was not up for debate. And Susan Faludi would come along and watch a lot of movies and call it a Backlash. Susie Bright was one of the few feminists that actually enjoyed sex toys and pornography openly and without apology. Even better, she wasn't completely insane like Camille Paglia (who is still fun to read - mostly because she's completely insane).

Suffice it to say that Susie Bright was a feminist heroine when I didn't think I needed feminist heroines. This book is every bit as honest, entertaining and witty as her essays. Divided into three major sections - parents, Commies and On Our Backs - it goes through several of the standards but from the perspective of one of the smartest political writers around. Her parents are presented as deeply troubled people with her mother's abusive tirades being a part of growing up that led her to always be apologizing in order to avoid the eggshells. Like many formerly abused children, the emotions are all jumbled up and she hates this woman and loves this woman at the same time. The second section centers on what she calls the Commie Camp where good intentions clashed with the kind of sociopaths and bullies that the leftwing fringe movement attracts. This reminded me of Baader Meinhof Complex (2pc) (Ws Sub) where politics were merely an excuse to murder but they made for a compelling excuse. Bright also reminds the reader of what her group was fighting for in vignettes including the one black co-worker that was fired because all the white women decided to lie about her. Finally the book comes to On Our Backs which was the major erotica work in the 1980s. She traces the origins of the magazine from the early days to the final dissolution when the magazine is floundering, the founder is marrying a customer at the strip club and she's being sued for breach of contract (a lawsuit which includes a gag order on her writing).

Of course, one can question why Susie Bright focuses so much on the bullies and the sociopaths that betrayed her or were always after her. And certainly a book that seems to keep coming back to a betrayal or an instance of someone booting Ms. Bright from a major organization comes under scrutiny since giving into the instinct to get back at a former compatriot always brings up the question of "well, is that the whole story" and certain Ms. Bright is biased. But she makes her case clearly and without undue passion and presents the facts in a way that you do believe that these people were thoroughly loathsome human beings. Obviously they may tell their side of the story one of these days but for now, it's one discordant note in an otherwise excellent memoir.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it! Activism & sex = perfect, August 5, 2011
This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
I loved this book! I already knew about Susie Bright's career in sexuality, but knew little of her childhood and history with (non-sex) activism. The plot is gripping, the writing excellent. If you ever get a chance to hear her speak in person, do it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blunt Biography Reveals Powerful, Real Woman, July 21, 2011
By 
TammyJo Eckhart "TammyJo Eckhart" (Bloomington, Indiana United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir (Hardcover)
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If you don't know who Susie Bright is and you are a woman, you need to read this book. Many of things that younger women, access to truthful information about bodies and our health, are in part the result of women such as Bright risking it all and never making much from their efforts beyond well wishes and insults to their faces. If you were an active part of the 1970s revolution and the feminist sex wars of the 1980s during those decades, they you will know her name even if you were on the opposite side of her.
This biography pays far less attention to the co-creator of "On Our Backs" than to Bright's childhood and teenage years. For people interested in all the gory details of her struggles in the 1980s until now, this will be a bit disappointing. For those who want to know more about how our earliest experiences can shape our adult lives, this is an eye-opening and bluntly honest book. I would expect nothing less from Bright.
Here you'll learn about her highly intelligent yet in many ways highly dysfunctional family. Did you know that Bright did time in the Left trenches for workers rights and women's right? I didn't but as I read I wasn't surprised. I was also not surprised that she had to make tough choice for her survival and her family's welfare.
Through it all Bright seems to have held on to her sense of right and wrong, honesty versus self-serving lies, and that alone makes her a great example of what any human being should hope to be remembered for. Do not read if you don't want some hard facts of life, this is not sugar coated.
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Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir
Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir by Susie Bright (Hardcover - March 22, 2011)
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